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BlayzingInfrno
September 16th, 2006, 11:02 AM
I've always been taught to use a track start but recently i've tried a grab start and it felt more natural for me.
How exactly does one do the grab start?
How much do you bend your knees?

breastroker
September 16th, 2006, 01:25 PM
Look at http://www.breaststroke.info/Is%20the%20Grab%20Start%20Dead%20rev2.htm

craiglll@yahoo.com
September 16th, 2006, 04:59 PM
I was always told to not bend yur knees at all. There has been a long thread recenlty aboutwhen the track start was first done.

BlayzingInfrno
September 18th, 2006, 12:10 AM
Wouldn't it make sense to start crouched?

knelson
September 18th, 2006, 10:01 AM
Yeah, I think you want to bend your knees. If your knees are locked where is your power going to come from?

DesertSwimr
September 18th, 2006, 05:13 PM
Originally posted by knelson
Yeah, I think you want to bend your knees. If your knees are locked where is your power going to come from?

Exactly, knelson! In the article cited above, it says, "The track start is noted for being more stable, and with the no false start rule this has led coaches to teach young swimmers the track start almost exclusively ... One of the weaknesses of the track start is that if the swimmerís back foot slips, this usually leads to a disastrous start. The grab start does not have this problem."

The only problem with the grab start, is that if there is forward motion in the body while leaning over, it is almost impossible to stop once it starts happening, thus resulting in a disqualification. That, however, is the only problem I see with it. Personally, I don't like the track start because my body weight is too spread-out over the block. I would rather have my body weight on the brink of falling over it. This encourages me to push off with more vigor. That's just my own thing though--I've talked to many swimmers who swear by the track start.

Jeff Commings
September 18th, 2006, 05:43 PM
Originally posted by DesertSwimr
In the article cited above, it says, "The track start is noted for being more stable, and with the no false start rule this has led coaches to teach young swimmers the track start almost exclusively ... One of the weaknesses of the track start is that if the swimmerís back foot slips, this usually leads to a disastrous start. The grab start does not have this problem."

Yes, it does. I have slipped twice in my life on grab starts -- slippery blocks. Make sure the block is dry before using it. Or that they are contoured, like the blocks at Stanford or just about every major pool in the USA.

tomtopo
September 19th, 2006, 05:36 PM
First, the pulling motion, in response to the horn, allows the swimmer to use the edge of the block that is perpendicular to the water. The front foot that pushes on this edge allows the swimmer to move forward, instead of up. Jumping first and not pulling toward the water will increase height but unless youíre a gazelle or an Olympic stud, that mistake will cost you distance. A violent pull toward the water gets you in the water quicker and if you time it correctly you will have find the optimum height and forward motion that will allow a smooth entry. The dominate leg (usually, not always, the right for right handed people and the left for left handed people) is the first to push off followed by the front foot. So the legs donít push at the same time. Good luck!

tomtopo
September 19th, 2006, 05:40 PM
The amount of bend in the knees should be similar to the bend that a basketball player uses during a jump-ball. Bending too much makes it difficult to make a quick and powerful start. Moving into a comfortable position that allows for a power position to be established is key. Keep working on and good luck.