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Allen Stark
September 17th, 2006, 07:02 PM
I just found out a good friend's sister was killed training for a Triathelon. She was biking in the morning and hit by an SUV. One of our Oregon swimmers was similarly killed earlier this year. Every time I read about a Triathlete it seems somewhere in the story they had to spend a year recovering from when they were hit by a car. Is this as common as it seems? I don't know what we can do,but it seems we should do something.

scyfreestyler
September 17th, 2006, 07:13 PM
Accidents happen but I do notice an awful lot of cyclists riding right on the fog/lane line. If I am driving close to it I could hit many of them with my mirror and still be in my lane...that is just stupidity on the cyclists part. However, no matter how careful you are while riding a bike you are going to be passed by thousands of cars and one is bound to make a mistake sooner or later (and that is assuming that you don't make a mistake somehow and make the odds even worse).

flipper79
September 17th, 2006, 07:56 PM
A few daredevil tris I know - believe they are invincible-wear black clothing with no reflectors at 5 in the morning. I almost hit one two different days on the way to practice as he flew through the red light as he went straight and I turned right on red. Luckily, I stopped at the red and looked both ways but I barely saw him in time, as he flew past me. Another morning he was coming from a different direction, again flying through a red light. I later told him he needs reflectors and that I almost hit him. He was pissy and said he's fine. I know several others like that. I'm surprised there are not more accidents.

waves101
September 18th, 2006, 09:55 AM
I know of one that happened this weekend. She was bike training and someone blew a stop sign at 35mph. Hit her broadside. Luckily she hit the hood, rolled up over the windshield and was thrown into the ditch about 100 feet later. I say Luckily because she has no apparent injuries other than the bumps and bruises. They are still assessing internal organs however so be sure to say a few good words for her.

knelson
September 18th, 2006, 10:05 AM
Originally posted by flipper79
I later told him he needs reflectors and that I almost hit him.

You should have also told him to start obeying traffic signals. I've got nothing againsy cyclists, and I'm sure the majority are following the rules, but I see plenty who think stop signs and traffic lights don't apply to them.

aquageek
September 18th, 2006, 10:06 AM
This is a very timely topic for those of us here in Charlotte. This past weekend was the MS 150 ride. A family was hit on the ride by a truck and the 15 year old daughter died. Most of my close friends were on this event.

lefty
September 18th, 2006, 11:34 AM
Road biking is simply dangerous. Blaming the cyclist is like blaming the wind for a trapeze accident.

You road bike long enough, you WILL get injured.

scyfreestyler
September 18th, 2006, 11:43 AM
Originally posted by lefty
Road biking is simply dangerous. Blaming the cyclist is like blaming the wind for a trapeze accident.

You road bike long enough, you WILL get injured.

You are correct to a certain extent...however, a cyclist that does not wear reflective clothing, rides on the lane line, and does not adhere to traffic signals is placing him/herself at much greater risk. If I hit a cyclist in an intersection because he/she failed to stop at the red light is that his fault or just an inevitable side effect of cycling?

lefty
September 18th, 2006, 11:58 AM
You're right Matt there are obvious situations when the cyclist is at fault. And the sky is blue accept when it is raining.

trout
September 18th, 2006, 12:23 PM
Matt,

If a cyclist is biking at or near the fog line, you are required by law to slow down, and stay behind the cyclist until you can pass safely (a minimum of 3 ft is required by some municipalities- more is better).

If you remain in "your" lane, and an accident occurs, you are legally at fault (not that it does the cyclist any good at this point).

Please drive and bike with consideration for others.

aquageek
September 18th, 2006, 12:26 PM
Originally posted by lefty
Road biking is simply dangerous. Blaming the cyclist is like blaming the wind for a trapeze accident.

You road bike long enough, you WILL get injured.

I do not agree with this at all. The route I take to the gym every morning at 5:30 am is also popular with cyclists. I am a big believer in sharing the road and I go out of my way to be courteous and treat cyclist as regular traffic. But, well over half the cyclists either wear zero reflective clothing or have lights that are half burnt out. I have seen on numerous occasions a group of riders blow through stop lights. I have had cyclists repeatedly go around me while I'm stopped for a left turn on red.

cantwait4bike
September 18th, 2006, 12:37 PM
First of all the majority of cyclist injuries from cars comes from (1) the red neck pickup drivers who can't turn the steering wheel a 1/8" to avoid a cyclist because their fat ugly gut is in the way (2) the soccer moms with a latte between their legs and the cell phone up their rear end and (3) Canadians who are completely in a mental fog about US driving regulations with regards to cyclist on the road or more likely stoned on Couver Gold.

There are two ways to ride a bike on most rural roads with limited or no shoulders. First one and most dangerous is to stay on the shoulder line. Everyone of the above three driver types will come within 3" of you. Second, get out in road where the auto passenger tire would normally be. Force the autos to move around you. If they come to close you can bail into the shoulder.

Always wear a rear view mirror on your glasses ($10), you can tell when trouble is coming usually. Take a cell phone along, and if possible bike with a group or partner. Pickup trucks you can smell , Soccer moms will be in Chrysler Minivans, and Canadians will have a picture of a weed on their licence plate.

dvarner
September 18th, 2006, 12:42 PM
FWIW, most of my cycling injuries were self-inflicted with no one else involved. Usually involves catapulting onto one or the other hip or sliding out on a wet turn. I can't imagine the additional pain and recovery time a vehicle would add to the equation. A road racer told me once that it's like a football coach being fired, you're either about to fall or you just got up from one. Getting killed doesn't compare - I hope we learn to be more patient and watchful, but what to do about "the other person" who won't?

DV

scyfreestyler
September 18th, 2006, 01:31 PM
Originally posted by trout
Matt,

If a cyclist is biking at or near the fog line, you are required by law to slow down, and stay behind the cyclist until you can pass safely (a minimum of 3 ft is required by some municipalities- more is better).

If you remain in "your" lane, and an accident occurs, you are legally at fault (not that it does the cyclist any good at this point).

Please drive and bike with consideration for others.

That is all fine and good but why on earth would a cyclist ride the fog line when there is a paved shoulder that is close to 3 feet wide and paved? I see this all the time and it makes me furious. I drive on a 2 lane highway several times a week and if the choice is to go head on with another car or to take out a cyclist, the opposing car is not going to be hit. I don't ride anymore but when I did I made darn sure to give cars as much room as possible on any road. If there was a paved shoulder I would ride as far to the right as possible while still being on pavement. Why stay to the left and place yourself in danger?

aquageek
September 18th, 2006, 01:40 PM
Oh no, we agree again, scyfreestyler, rock on, Killer!

flipper79
September 18th, 2006, 01:53 PM
knelson,
I didn't mention traffic signals to the tri because I already knew that (in his mind) rules don't apply to him. (or his tri buddies)

scyfreestyler
September 18th, 2006, 02:09 PM
Originally posted by aquageek
Oh no, we agree again, scyfreestyler, rock on, Killer!

My heavens! What is this world coming to?!! :D

ande
September 18th, 2006, 03:44 PM
biking can be very dangerous
if you do it long enough you will crash and or hit a car, get road rash and maybe break something or several things

I have several friends who cycle. All of them have crashed, several of them have crashed into cars.

that's the beauty of swimming, no road rash.

I think 2 cyclists have been killed in austin this year.
A friend of mine's dad died on his bike this year when a car hit him
Car drivers aren't looking for cyclists.

A guy I swam with manages Lance Armstrong, several years ago a guy was in his office and asked him,

How much do you make a year from lance?

Is his safety important to you?

How much would it cost a year to give him a car escort when he's training?

Would it be worth it?

so from that point on lance had a car escort him on most training rides.

~ ~ ~

the other problem is having an accident out in the middle of nowhere miles from medical help or a hospital


Ande


Originally posted by Allen Stark
I just found out a good friend's sister was killed training for a Triathelon. She was biking in the morning and hit by an SUV. One of our Oregon swimmers was similarly killed earlier this year. Every time I read about a Triathlete it seems somewhere in the story they had to spend a year recovering from when they were hit by a car. Is this as common as it seems? I don't know what we can do,but it seems we should do something.

DesertSwimr
September 18th, 2006, 05:05 PM
Originally posted by aquageek
well over half the cyclists either wear zero reflective clothing or have lights that are half burnt out. [/B]

My ex-boyfriend was a big road and mountain biker. Even with reflective clothing, lights, and knowing and abiding by traffic laws, he was broadsided by a lil' old lady one night. The hood was hot due to the amount of time she had been driving and seared off his shorts, burning his skin. In any case, he was a well-seasoned biker and had seen the worst of accidents, bruises, scrapes, and broken bones, but he could never have controlled nor predicted the actions of the person behind the wheel. Dangerous? Sure, but what are you all going to do--not bike and not push yourself because you're scared? Surely, you might live longer, but will you enjoy it?! :confused:

scyfreestyler
September 18th, 2006, 07:46 PM
Hmm?

Fact #1 A member named Amanda

Fact #2 A member with a breaststroking avatar

Fact #3 A member who is from Tucson, Az.

What could this swimmer's last name be?

triathlontraining
October 15th, 2006, 02:44 PM
As a cyclist, I have to say that it is always important to ride defensively.

I've had drivers go out of their to endanger me, had things thrown at and be hit by them, and, ofcourse, been yelled/honked at for no apparent reason.

You can't assume that everyone is aware of you as you ride and for that matter, is willing to share the road, or even the world, with you.


All that aside, I will continue to ride, albeit cautiously.

SolarEnergy
October 15th, 2006, 07:13 PM
I just found out a good friend's sister was killed training for a Triathelon. She was biking in the morning and hit by an SUV. One of our Oregon swimmers was similarly killed earlier this year. Every time I read about a Triathlete it seems somewhere in the story they had to spend a year recovering from when they were hit by a car. Is this as common as it seems? I don't know what we can do,but it seems we should do something. Last summer, mid august, a cyclist got killed hit by... an other cyclist.

A good friend of mine was leading a pace line over 40kmh on a Formula1 race track (that's where we do our intervals), when a cyclist engaged on the track without looking first. My friend hit him, the guy didn't wear a helmet. Head knocked the ground and he died right there.

Cycling is probably by far the most dangerous thing cyclists do.

Muppet
October 22nd, 2006, 06:51 PM
Biking is as dangerous as you make it... I liken it to driving or flying - the vast majority of the time it is safe as can be, but the disasters are disasterous.

Speaking from experience, any time you bike on the road or on trails with plenty of other "traffic," the cyclist should be completely aware of their surroundings. A crowded paved trail was my nemesis summer '05 (crashed into another biker, broken wrist), but I learned my lesson - slow down in the crowds, even when you're training.

The speed factor is a good one too - everyone wants to push it for training; thats part of the reason my accident was as bad as it was. Crashes usually happen when the speed gets too much for the cyclist to handle. But like I started my post - if you ride faster than you can handle, you're asking for it.

Always wear a helmet
-jeff