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Seagurl51
November 13th, 2006, 10:01 AM
I know that with weights for swimming you're supposed to do high reps-low weight, but how many reps is enough? Are you supposed to do like 3 sets of 10 or 5 sets of 40? I'm new to the whole weights thing, so any input would be good. Right now I'm doing lat pulls, bench press, bicep and tricep curls.


Thanks a bunch!:groovy:

Warren
November 13th, 2006, 10:17 AM
Weight lifting programs are very compliated. The kind of lifting you should do depends on which events you are doing. What events do you do?

etrain
November 13th, 2006, 10:20 AM
I do 3 sets of 15 to 20 depending on the station I am at. I usually add weight for each set so that the last set once I get to 10 or so I really have to work to finish out the set.

etrain

nkfrench
November 13th, 2006, 11:10 AM
A smart USAS coach I asked suggested that you cycle your training. For 3 weeks, do the traditional 3 sets of 10-15 type lifting to failure on the last rep.

For the next 3 weeks, drop down to very low weight and lift for a minute on at the same rate as your desired stroke rate, then take a minute off, then do it again. Don't throw the weights - even though its fast it needs to be controlled and go through the full range of motion. If you don't mind the stares, you can set your watch to beep with the suggested cadence. The cadence is more important than the weight.

This was a while back, not sure if this is the current thinking but it made a lot of sense to me at the time. It could be done with stretchcords or dumbells and it can hammer you even with 5-10#. At first a minute may be too long; later you can build up to longer work periods.

Strength with weights doesn't necessarily translate to swimmin' fast though.

FlyQueen
November 13th, 2006, 12:01 PM
When I could lift I did a lot of: 40, 20, 10. Adding weight each time. I would do counter muscles as well - for example I would do 40 bicep curls then immediately switch to 40 tricep curls (or tricep work) then 20 bi/20 tri then 10/10. It also depends on where you are in the season. Someone mentioned lifting at your stroke rate. When I do back extensions in particular I'm always focusing on fly. Thinking about how many strokes per length I take and how many I'll need for my 50 & 100.
ALSO: CORE WORK is probably the MOST important!

When/If I can start really lifting agian I'm planning on 2 days of endurance lifting 1 day of strength then maybe switching that as the season progresses to 1 endurance and 2 strength - but I'm a sprinter.

hofffam
November 13th, 2006, 12:58 PM
I know that with weights for swimming you're supposed to do high reps-low weight, but how many reps is enough? Are you supposed to do like 3 sets of 10 or 5 sets of 40? I'm new to the whole weights thing, so any input would be good. Right now I'm doing lat pulls, bench press, bicep and tricep curls.


Thanks a bunch!:groovy:

I am not lifting weights right now but I think the traditional view of high reps/low weight for swimmers is no longer the obvious choice. A growing number of coaches suggest that if the goal is to increase strength - you should lift heavy. Not powerlifter heavy, but enough weight that you work hard to do 8-10 reps.

I think the decades-old philosophy of doing 20 reps shows that it doesn't increase strength much because it doesn't overload the muscles much.

There has been a fair amount of discussion on this on the collegeswimming.com board over the last year and it seems many NCAA programs are lifting much more weight today than they did a decade ago.

I suggest that you NOT ignore the abdominals - stomach and lower back. These areas have a tremendous impact on body rotation, breast/fly, etc.

swimmieAvsFan
November 13th, 2006, 01:21 PM
There has been a fair amount of discussion on this on the collegeswimming.com board over the last year and it seems many NCAA programs are lifting much more weight today than they did a decade ago.



i know when i swam for Penn State, our strength coaches were of the HIT (high intensity training) school of thought. meaning we would lift to failure every single round. even if that meant we were only getting 4 reps the second round of an exercise. this is the same way the football players lifted, but all the exercises were as sport specific as possible. and it hurt. a lot! but i think it worked, cause PSU has won 3 big ten womens' championships in this decade... :D

Seagurl51
November 13th, 2006, 03:15 PM
Thanks for all the help so far. One other question, how long do I wait between sets?

The Fortress
November 13th, 2006, 04:24 PM
I am not lifting weights right now but I think the traditional view of high reps/low weight for swimmers is no longer the obvious choice. A growing number of coaches suggest that if the goal is to increase strength - you should lift heavy. Not powerlifter heavy, but enough weight that you work hard to do 8-10 reps.

I think the decades-old philosophy of doing 20 reps shows that it doesn't increase strength much because it doesn't overload the muscles much.


Hoffam:

You know your stuff. For sprinters, I've been told that it's better to do higher weights in sets of 10 to fatigue. But the high reps/low weights still holds true for rotator cuff exercises because you're working those itsy bitsy muscles. And the abs are definitely key.

Allen Stark
November 13th, 2006, 09:09 PM
I went from 2 sets of 12 to 3 sets of 8(with heavier weights) and feel it really has helped my power.I tend to not wait between reps but do an upper body set then a leg set then back to the upper body set etc. Swimming is a high rep low weight exercise so doing high rep low weight lifts doesn't add much.