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View Full Version : Being in shape for the gym and the real world. Is there a difference?



Seagurl51
December 19th, 2006, 05:34 PM
I tried running outside today for the first time since I was about 5, and it could have gone better. I made it a total of about 10 minutes and I maybe ran a mile. Then I started to feel sick to my stomach (though that could have been the pizza), and got a side ache and really tired. But when I'm in the gym, I can run for at least 30 minutes no problems.

Any ideas of how to make my gym enduracne translate to the road? :dunno:

aquageek
December 19th, 2006, 06:20 PM
This is a funny post. I had the EXACT same problem recently. I just quit exercising outside as my solution.

The Fortress
December 19th, 2006, 06:55 PM
This is a funny post. I had the EXACT same problem recently. I just quit exercising outside as my solution.

At least you're still doing drylands, Geek.

Kyra:

It takes awhile. Many years ago, I only went to the gym to hit the ellipse machine, treadmill or late night spinning classes. Then, after awhile, I decided, like you, to become a "runner" and enjoy nature more. I felt awful at first and was appalled at my apparent lack of fitness. It took a long while before my legs adapted. You have to start running very gradually, give yourself some rest, and only go up 10% a week. After a month or so, you'll feel better. But it ain't gonna happen over night. It takes a goodly time for the legs to adapt and sometimes you'll still have the plods if you don't take rest days.

Once the legs come around, you can ramp it some more, if you want to. I ramped it up a lot for a long time, thought I was in decent shape, and got injured. Then, after all those years of running, I got back in the pool and felt like I could barely swim a 100. So then I felt out of shape in different way... Sometimes, one wonders if one is ever in shape... Just take it slowly and wear good running shoes. Don't always run on the road either. Trails and dirt are good for avoiding shin splints. Sounds like you may need to drink some water in advance of your run so you don't get side stitches. Poolraat may be able to tell you more since he was an age group runner, and I was an adult onset runner.

I considered quitting like Geek, but I'm living with a couple of runners who would have given me endless grief. So, now, I just run outside several times a week for fun and "nature."

islandsox
December 19th, 2006, 07:28 PM
Kyra,
I am not a runner, never have been, but friends of mine are. And, we have talked about this a lot--the difference between indoors and outdoors. And, now that I think about it, I have encountered this problem with swimming indoor vs outdoor pools.

In an indoor pool, fresh air is at a minimum compared to an outdoor pool. In running, the road (terrain) is quite different from an indoor track. No outside running will ever be completely level plus there is the wind factor (or not), as well as more humidity or not, spending energy looking at the ground to make sure you won't encounter anything to stumble on, etc.

I just wonder if any of these things could have made an outdoor run a tad more difficult. Several years ago, some friends of mine who were going to do the run in the triathlon only trained on treadmills, indoor track, etc. I mentioned to them that it might be good to take their training outdoors to a place that would best immulate the conditions that were upcoming. They had a hard time adjusting for some of the reasons mentioned.

I guess I am the kind of person who looks at everything to try to better understand how I feel and why when I am exercising.

Just a consideration.

Donna

Caped Crusader
December 19th, 2006, 09:54 PM
This is a funny post. I had the EXACT same problem recently. I just quit exercising outside as my solution.

Geek:

I didn't take you for a quiter. Running is hard. But it can't be worse than swimming. It takes time and effort. But sometimes, "it hurts so good." Besides, who wants to be inside all the time? Bad air circulation, second hand smoke, chlorine fumes and fridges full of TFs. Well, I guess there may be scotch inside too.

Dominick Aielloeaver
December 20th, 2006, 01:58 AM
Well, when we talk about being in shape. Are we being in shape for our own personel , well being. Or are we talking about some competition. Like tennis, running, swimming, football, etc. Each sport has its own set of physical activty. You can not train for boxing like you woul train for baseball.:rolleyes: :groovy:

aquageek
December 20th, 2006, 04:59 AM
Geek:

I didn't take you for a quiter.

I didn't quit running, just have not done it outside again. I stick to the treadmill for now.

With the gym being closed a lot in the coming days, I may have to venture outdoors again.

FindingMyInnerFish
December 20th, 2006, 07:13 AM
I do a fair amount of running, mostly outdoors (have been a runner since I was in my mid-/late thirties and have run races from 200 dash to marathon). And I use the treadmill very infrequently, since I like being outdoors much more.

But sometimes do find the treadmill necessary: when the footing is too icy outdoors; when it's dark (crackpots on the road, unseen cracks in the sidewalks--tho I still prefer to be outdoors if running with others). So I had to learn to get used to it and had the opposite problem fr/ Seagurl--took a while to get used to running on something that was moving underneath my feet and had to go back to about ten mins. at a time and work my way up. Also get bored on the 'mill more than on the road, so find that if I play around with the speed and incline, it keeps things more interesting.

One thing though about the treadmill: less impact underfoot. Seagurl, if you're running outside, are you using sidewalks? I can feel a definite difference running on a sidewalk vs. running on grass or dirt trails... or on outdoor running tracks (especially the ones w/ artificial surface). Lately, I've tried to stay off concrete as much as I can.

So Seagurl, don't give up on outdoor running... so much to see! Just try different surfaces... and be careful about isolated areas for safety reasons.

FlyQueen
December 20th, 2006, 08:49 AM
I tried running outside today for the first time since I was about 5, and it could have gone better. I made it a total of about 10 minutes and I maybe ran a mile. Then I started to feel sick to my stomach (though that could have been the pizza), and got a side ache and really tired. But when I'm in the gym, I can run for at least 30 minutes no problems.

Any ideas of how to make my gym enduracne translate to the road? :dunno:


Typically I have the exact opposite problem. When I was marathon training I could run 18 or 20 miles outside no problem (okay, maybe no problem is a bit of a stretch). I would die after 3 on a treadmill though, then get up the next morning and do 8-12 outside and feel great.

I think treadmills are boring, but they also let you regulate your pace much more than you can do on your own. Temperature is another factor.

Keep in mind the first 10 minutes is usually the hardest ...

CreamPuff
December 20th, 2006, 08:59 AM
Seagurl,

You are not alone! I noticed the same thing in my training.

First, when I was a kid, I had junior national cuts in the fly but could not run half a mile to save my life (and I would get terrible cramps when attempting to run). Just realized that to truly be in great physical condition, you can't limit yourself to one medium and one condition.

Also - I too noticed that I could run great on a treadmill and then I died outside on the track, road, trails, etc. (This was as an adult). I asked a trainer at the gym and he said that we are missing the forward force on the treadmill along with hills and wind resistance. And, the treadmill is a better (bouncier) medium to run on. So, what I did was start with short runs outside (10 minutes) and just built up to 5 miles or so over time. I was sure to alternate treadmill sessions with running outside. I'm right there with you. I think this is normal for many of us who did not have a serious running background.

I really notice how much "heavier" I feel on land as compared to the water. Makes me appreicate the pool. Keep it up and don't give up on it!!! I really think that becoming a better runner helps me physically and mentally in my swimming races!

You mentioned your pizza filled stomach. . . I cannot eat before running. Otherwise, I wanna barf. That whole gravity thing is brutal on land. . .
:laugh2:

Leonard Jansen
December 20th, 2006, 09:00 AM
At least you're still doing drylands, Geek.
I considered quitting like Geek, but I'm living with a couple of runners who would have given me endless grief. So, now, I just run outside several times a week for fun and "nature."

Easy solution: Take up racewalking instead. They will be so embarrassed that they will beg you not to exercise outside. Besides, you can probably use it as a lever to make Rude Hormonal Fortress behave: "Clean up your room young lady or I will start racewalking at the track at your school in front of your friends."

-LBJ

The Fortress
December 20th, 2006, 09:08 AM
Easy solution: Take up racewalking instead. They will be so embarrassed that they will beg you not to exercise outside. Besides, you can probably use it as a lever to make Rude Hormonal Fortress behave: "Clean up your room young lady or I will start racewalking at the track at your school in front of your friends."
-LBJ

Now why didn't I think of that?! I may actually use that line on my runner son if he misbehaves. Very clever LBJ. That's why I wanted to meet you. But racewalking looks hard to master. I'm still working on that OW swimming thing. How many sports can one do at once? I'm not Muppet you know ... And that Natalie/Heather/runner/swimmer/gymnast chick is two decades younger than me ... I can't keep up with her.

Treadmills are good when there is ice and snow. I do think they're much easier than running outside and much easier on the bod.

FlyQueen
December 20th, 2006, 09:32 AM
Now why didn't I think of that?! I may actually use that line on my runner son if he misbehaves. Very clever LBJ. That's why I wanted to meet you. But racewalking looks hard to master. I'm still working on that OW swimming thing. How many sports can one do at once? I'm not Muppet you know ... And that Natalie/Heather/runner/swimmer/gymnast chick is two decades younger than me ... I can't keep up with her.

Treadmills are good when there is ice and snow. I do think they're much easier than running outside and much easier on the bod.


Former runner, and believe me I wasn't blazing any trails ... all fast twitch muscles over here ...

Actually, I can't run anymore because of my back. I have some funky thing with the base of spine I can't exactly remember the name of or explain ... so I stick to the pool, where I'm guessing you could kick my posterior ...

SwimStud
December 20th, 2006, 11:06 AM
Former runner, and believe me I wasn't blazing any trails ... all fast twitch muscles over here ...

Actually, I can't run anymore because of my back. I have some funky thing with the base of spine I can't exactly remember the name of or explain ... so I stick to the pool, where I'm guessing you could kick my posterior ...

I can commiserate on the lower back issues...the beauty of swimming ...I can still swim with a back spasm (not aggressively of course), and actually help ease it....

Seagurl51
December 20th, 2006, 11:53 AM
Thanks everybody for the tips!! :woot:

The running for now is just a temporary thing because my pool is closed for the holidays and I don't have access to a gym. So I won't be too upset if it's not good (sounds like it's normal for beginners), and at least I'm doing something. And who knows, maybe if I take it easy, I'll actually start to like running.:eek:

aztimm
December 20th, 2006, 03:16 PM
I have pretty much the opposite reaction, have a difficult time getting going on the treadmill and keeping at it. When I travel to an area I don't know, I'll usually use the treadmill since it is easy on/off, but that easy on/off means that after 15 minutes I'll start to think of getting off of it. For me to stay on a treadmill for 30 minutes straight through is a long time.

While I'm at home, I run outside on weekends, there's a pathway that goes alongside a canal near where I live. I go about 1-1/2 mile north, turn around, pass where I started (but on the other side of the canal), then go 1-1/2 to 2 miles south before heading back. There are times when my stomach or an odd muscle will start to bother me, usually around the final turn point. The way I see it at that point is that I need to get back anyway, so I might as well keep running, and either the ache goes away or I lose track of it. I do carry a mobile phone with me, in case something unexpected happens.

When I run outside, I can easily run for an hour (7+ miles) without really thinking about it. It is a somewhat scenic path past some farms, a small airport, and some backyards, with just a few points where I cross streets.

I think my swimming is similar. Ever since I moved to AZ and have been swimming outside, it is extremely difficult for me to swim inside. This morning the outside temp was about 35, but the water was a toasty 80, and I'd gladly take that over swimming inside anyday. When I go to a place where I have to swim inside, I'll do it, but never really get as much out of it, and feel much more tired afterwards.

Caped Crusader
December 22nd, 2006, 10:33 AM
I can commiserate on the lower back issues...the beauty of swimming ...I can still swim with a back spasm (not aggressively of course), and actually help ease it....

I can commiserate on the lower back issue too. But I can still run with it. I hate treadmills. The outdoors is where it's at. I run through snowstorms. Pool's OK in a pinch.