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rtodd
December 28th, 2006, 09:27 PM
Here's the deal.

I can only swim 50 min to one hour a day, which equates to at most 2000 yards for endurance work and 1500 yards for faster interval work with more rest.

I feel guilty when I read about other peoples yardage. Is anyone putting up some fast freestyle times with this little yardage? If so, what are the times? I really want to know.

Allen Stark
December 28th, 2006, 09:52 PM
I dont have time to swim more than 1 hr at a time either. This is plenty of time to swim fast,if you are mindful. Also if you can supplement your swimming with other exercising it helps. I do stability ball exercises wathing TV and stationary biking reading the newspaper. If you only have 50 minutes make every minute count. That doesn't mean trying for maximum yardage,it means planning what you are going to do carefully given your goal. You said free so lets say your goal event is the 100. What do YOU need to make YOUR 100 Free faster.Aerobic endurance is not the most important thing for the100. Starts, turns,streamling,technique,finding your race pace are more important for the 100. These all can be honed in 50-60 min.workouts. How fast you can go depends on many things,including genetics.One thing is certain,you will swim much faster working out 50 min. at a time than if you don't.If you swim 50 min.4 times per week you will be in better shape than 99% of the country.

Caped Crusader
December 28th, 2006, 10:11 PM
Coach T posted a solid comment on the value of high intensity swimming on the "vessel" thread. Ande and Allen also seem advocate this for sprinters.

So, should sprinters only do sprint specific sets and lift weights and do plyos?

Should sprinters bother with or just loaf endurance sets?

Should they get in shape or just get in shape to sprint?

What if sprinters are also endurance junkies? Will endurance actually kill their speed?

Warren
December 28th, 2006, 11:13 PM
I do about 1500-2000 per work out, im 19

50 free- 21.83
100 free- 50.00

I do alot of sprint work in my practices though so if you training for anything over a 100, 2000 yards ain't going to fly.

Heres an interesting fact, Jason Lezak does only 4000 yards/meters per work out 5 times a week. Yardage doesn't mean jack. Quality yardage is what matters. If Lezak started doing 10,000 meters a day he would definatly not make bejing in the 50 free and its posible that he might not make it in the 100either. Training for swimming is really all about science. The more laps the better attitude won't get you anywhere. Alot of age group coaches have this attitude and I hate thoes people.

funkyfish
December 28th, 2006, 11:43 PM
I think it's possible to swim "fast" with only swimming 1500-2000 per session. As mentioned above, the key is intensity. Fast is a relative term, but let's say you swam 5x200s on a 3:30, take a 5 min. rest, and do 10x100s on a 1:30. That's 2000yds in 32:30. That gives you plenty of time for a 500 warm up (say 8 min.) and an easy 500 cool down (10 min.). There's 3000 in 50:30. Add 3 minutes between warm up and the work sets and 3 minutes between the work sets and cool down and it's 3000 in 56:30.

I'd say that if you can achieve the above work sets then you should be resonably "fast." I'm still trying to get back "into shape," so I've only been doing 2000yds in about 45 minutes (the 200s are on a 4:00 and the 100s are on a 2:00), but I can break 1:00 in the 100m free. Not great but not shabby.

I swim MWF and lift TR (sometimes Sat). Some swim sessions I pretend that I'm a butterflyer and do my 100s half free/half fly.

The starts, turns, streamlining, etc. that Mr. Stark mentions should have equal priority to building finesse, IMO. Again, this is what I've been playing around with for the past 5-6 months as I try to get competitive again. Take it for what it's worth.

rtodd
December 29th, 2006, 04:07 PM
Warren,

You just prove to me that it can be done. Also, for someone like Lezak, that can't be alot of yardage for an olympian. I think Gary Hall Jr. also wrote about doing mindless volume and how it interfered with going fast.

Another question,

Why is it I never hear of sprinters doing full recovery? and by that I mean at least 10 minutes between 100's. If we are going to do anaerobic workouts, doesn't it make sense to buffer that lactic acid between reps so that quality and intensity can be maintained with each rep?

This leads to low volume workouts!! I don't think sprinters should be guilty of 2000 yd workouts. At least 41 yr old ones anyway.

FlyQueen
December 29th, 2006, 04:19 PM
Warren,

You just prove to me that it can be done. Also, for someone like Lezak, that can't be alot of yardage for an olympian. I think Gary Hall Jr. also wrote about doing mindless volume and how it interfered with going fast.

Another question,

Why is it I never hear of sprinters doing full recovery? and by that I mean at least 10 minutes between 100's. If we are going to do anaerobic workouts, doesn't it make sense to buffer that lactic acid between reps so that quality and intensity can be maintained with each rep?

This leads to low volume workouts!! I don't think sprinters should be guilty of 2000 yd workouts. At least 41 yr old ones anyway.


I've read of the elite doing 100s on 8:00 and I think Coughlin will do them race pace on 12:00 ....

valhallan
December 29th, 2006, 04:34 PM
2000 yards a workout is enough to be able to pop a good time for a 50 yard event. My former coach swims this much per day and he's ranked in the top ten for his age group. If you want to be able to perform well in a 200...a little more volume may be necessary.

Not to say that being a good 200 swimmer isn't possible with small yardage totals...but it's not the ideal formula.

Paul Smith
December 29th, 2006, 04:34 PM
njBrunelli



Joined: 19 Mar 2006
Posts: 56
Location: tempe Arizona

Paul Smith
December 29th, 2006, 04:37 PM
Lezak's competition (Nick Brunelli) has a bit of a different theory on training for sprinters.....below is a post from his Race Club blog.

Goes to show you.....to each his own!

njBrunelli
Joined: 19 Mar 2006
Posts: 56
Location: tempe Arizona
Posted: Thu Dec 28, 2006 9:53 pm Post subject:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
-Right after the 4-week mark from surgery, I was back in the water kicking. Vertical kicking and kicking on my back keeping my arm fully secured to my body.

-6 weeks after surgery I was able to move my shoulder slightly in the water but only light motions and no pulling or recovering over the water.

-Around 8 weeks, I was now moving my arm in a swim like motion but I was still not able to pull water. My swimming range of motion for freestyle was about 80 percent. I was having trouble getting on my left side and extending my arm out in front. During this time I was using fins and letting my arm move but not pull water. The Sets I did were all kick dominated. And when I swam I would just swim sets of 200's easy with fins making sure my stroke technique was where it needed to be.

-Around 10 weeks I was swimming again and able to use the arm a lot more. My range of motion for freestyle was about 90 percent. This is where I was doing longer swims. An idea would be 300's and 400s just working on stroke technique. This is when I started to explore other strokes, mainly backstroke.

12 weeks out I was swimming full time, but no sprinting. I was working on technique and 200-pace stuff. My backstroke was a good break when my shoulder was getting tired from freestyle. A practice looked like this:

500 warm up
4 x 150 kick on 2:30 desc
4 x 100 kick on 1:45 neg. split
4 x 50 kick on 1min fast 25 under water 25 over water
12 x 75s swim/dr/swim
20 x 50's swim on 1min - all holding 200 pace keeping stroke together
5 x 200's swim on 2:30 - desc to 80% working stroke technique.
1 x 600 swim with fins working stroke tech with fins

-About 14 weeks out from surgery, Dec 19th we did this set:

Yards set
32 x 50's on 1 min. 1 easy 1 fast from a push
Held 23.1 to 22.6 on all the fast ones.

-16 weeks on Dec. 27th I was home swimming with BOSS, (Bay and Ocean State Squids) out of Harvard and Brown. I did what the team was doing. Here is the set:

Meters set
1 x 800 Back 100 dr/100 swim
1 x 800 Back Desc by 200's
1 x 800 Back fast neg split
The last 400 I was 4:45

tomtopo
December 29th, 2006, 05:09 PM
You can add some isometrics to improve your stroke. I love the idea of quality vs. quantity. As one of our colleagues said "get rid of the junk". You should be able to swim fast or faster on that yardage if you can improve your technique (streamlining, EVF, cardio). Train smarter is the key and I know you can do it! Coach T.

knelson
December 29th, 2006, 05:36 PM
I do about 1500-2000 per work out, im 19

50 free- 21.83
100 free- 50.00


Maybe if you bump it up to 2500 you'll be able to break 50 seconds in the 100!

Only half kidding. If you can go sub 22 in the 50 you really should be able to break 50 in the 100.

Warren
December 29th, 2006, 05:40 PM
Warren,

You just prove to me that it can be done. Also, for someone like Lezak, that can't be alot of yardage for an olympian. I think Gary Hall Jr. also wrote about doing mindless volume and how it interfered with going fast.

Another question,

Why is it I never hear of sprinters doing full recovery? and by that I mean at least 10 minutes between 100's. If we are going to do anaerobic workouts, doesn't it make sense to buffer that lactic acid between reps so that quality and intensity can be maintained with each rep?

This leads to low volume workouts!! I don't think sprinters should be guilty of 2000 yd workouts. At least 41 yr old ones anyway.


Gary Hall Jr does almost all of his aerobic work outside the pool because he believes that there are better ways to get aerobic training with out doing lap after lap in the pool. He had the second fastest second lap in the 100 in sydney, so that says alot about his aerobic level. He also says that in practice you should do things that make you feel the same pain as you do in your particular event. You feel different at the end of a 100 compared to the 1500. Its a different pain. And If you are training for the 50 you can not achieve the right pain if you are doing tons of laps.

here is what gary said on his site.
"Okay, here is something else you can try. If you can't put a stationary bike next to the pool, try this. Hold your breathe while you do 10-20 pushups. Try starting with 10 and work your way up. Be in your suit already. Get up from the pushups, dive in, kick 25 underwater all out, then pop up and sprint 25 all out.

If you do this right you should feel that horrible burn (that makes you want to throw up) that you feel at the end of an all out (competition all out) 100.

There are different kinds of pain. There are sharp pain and dull aching pain. The pain that you feel during a 10K practice isn't anything like the pain that you will feel doing a set of these 50's.

If you do a set of ten of these 50's, if you can, you just swam 500. 500 is not very far, but you have recreated the exact pain that you feel in the competition! Try it. Don't pass out."

geochuck
December 29th, 2006, 05:41 PM
I have started my 1000m a day again and intend to win the 100 and 50 fly and free in my age groupin Winnipeg in May. I think I will be fast enough.

Warren
December 29th, 2006, 05:44 PM
Maybe if you bump it up to 2500 you'll be able to break 50 seconds in the 100!

Only half kidding. If you can go sub 22 in the 50 you really should be able to break 50 in the 100.

yeah I know, Its more than one factor though. I'm bad at flip turns and bad at splitting. When I went 50 I took it out to slow. 24.03 25.97. My goal is to get my 100 down to 47.99 with 22.5 25.49.

ande
December 30th, 2006, 02:40 PM
yes you can swim very fast on 1,500 to 2000 a day

warm up

do some stroke drills

main set:
do high quality sprints with plenty of rest (swimming and kicking)
15's, 25's, 50's 75's 100's
do repeat sets and racing
swim down after each hard effort

swim down

get out

it's important to lift weights / get strong

ande



Here's the deal.

I can only swim 50 min to one hour a day, which equates to at most 2000 yards for endurance work and 1500 yards for faster interval work with more rest.

I feel guilty when I read about other peoples yardage. Is anyone putting up some fast freestyle times with this little yardage? If so, what are the times? I really want to know.

ande
December 30th, 2006, 02:43 PM
i didn't read your post all the way yesterday paul I thought those were YOUR work out times not nick's and I was thinking crap I've got my work cut out for me

even if a swimmer is having success with the short high intensity work outs
if they are elite you can be pretty sure at some point in their careers they put in some seriious work

ande


Lezak's competition (Nick Brunelli) has a bit of a different theory on training for sprinters.....below is a post from his Race Club blog.

Goes to show you.....to each his own!

njBrunelli
Joined: 19 Mar 2006
Posts: 56
Location: tempe Arizona
Posted: Thu Dec 28, 2006 9:53 pm Post subject:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
-Right after the 4-week mark from surgery, I was back in the water kicking. Vertical kicking and kicking on my back keeping my arm fully secured to my body.

-6 weeks after surgery I was able to move my shoulder slightly in the water but only light motions and no pulling or recovering over the water.

-Around 8 weeks, I was now moving my arm in a swim like motion but I was still not able to pull water. My swimming range of motion for freestyle was about 80 percent. I was having trouble getting on my left side and extending my arm out in front. During this time I was using fins and letting my arm move but not pull water. The Sets I did were all kick dominated. And when I swam I would just swim sets of 200's easy with fins making sure my stroke technique was where it needed to be.

-Around 10 weeks I was swimming again and able to use the arm a lot more. My range of motion for freestyle was about 90 percent. This is where I was doing longer swims. An idea would be 300's and 400s just working on stroke technique. This is when I started to explore other strokes, mainly backstroke.

12 weeks out I was swimming full time, but no sprinting. I was working on technique and 200-pace stuff. My backstroke was a good break when my shoulder was getting tired from freestyle. A practice looked like this:

500 warm up
4 x 150 kick on 2:30 desc
4 x 100 kick on 1:45 neg. split
4 x 50 kick on 1min fast 25 under water 25 over water
12 x 75s swim/dr/swim
20 x 50's swim on 1min - all holding 200 pace keeping stroke together
5 x 200's swim on 2:30 - desc to 80% working stroke technique.
1 x 600 swim with fins working stroke tech with fins

-About 14 weeks out from surgery, Dec 19th we did this set:

Yards set
32 x 50's on 1 min. 1 easy 1 fast from a push
Held 23.1 to 22.6 on all the fast ones.

-16 weeks on Dec. 27th I was home swimming with BOSS, (Bay and Ocean State Squids) out of Harvard and Brown. I did what the team was doing. Here is the set:

Meters set
1 x 800 Back 100 dr/100 swim
1 x 800 Back Desc by 200's
1 x 800 Back fast neg split
The last 400 I was 4:45

ande
December 30th, 2006, 02:46 PM
one comment
with 21.83 50 speed
your 100 should be much faster than 50.0
on paper you should be able to go
under 48
21.83 + 1 + 21.83 + 3 = 47.66

ande


I do about 1500-2000 per work out, im 19

50 free- 21.83
100 free- 50.00

I do alot of sprint work in my practices though so if you training for anything over a 100, 2000 yards ain't going to fly.

Heres an interesting fact, Jason Lezak does only 4000 yards/meters per work out 5 times a week. Yardage doesn't mean jack. Quality yardage is what matters. If Lezak started doing 10,000 meters a day he would definatly not make bejing in the 50 free and its posible that he might not make it in the 100either. Training for swimming is really all about science. The more laps the better attitude won't get you anywhere. Alot of age group coaches have this attitude and I hate thoes people.

Warren
December 30th, 2006, 03:09 PM
one comment
with 21.83 50 speed
your 100 should be much faster than 50
on paper you should be able to go
under 48
21.83 + 1 + 21.83 + 3 = 47.66

ande

I'm working on it. I would be thrilled if I could go 47.66

knelson
December 30th, 2006, 03:42 PM
When I went 50 I took it out to slow. 24.03 25.97. My goal is to get my 100 down to 47.99 with 22.5 25.49.

Yes, definitely took it out too slow, which is actually a good thing because it should make you pretty confident you can swim much faster with better splitting. I think your 47.99 is a very realistic goal.

In response to rtodd: I don't know how to say this without seeming like a bit of an elitist, but here goes. I think there are a lot of fast masters swimmers who only train 50 minutes to an hour per day, but I think most of them are getting in a lot more than 1500-2000 yards in that amount of time. I can get in close to 3,000 with more sprint work, and 4,000 with more endurance focus. Now, I don't know how old you are, so obviously things are different if we're talking about a "fast" 25 year old versus a "fast" 70 year old, but still 2,000 yards in an hour doesn't seem like much. Can you try to increase how much yardage you're getting in per workout?

rtodd
December 30th, 2006, 04:36 PM
I'm 42.

I can swim 1000yds in 18 minutes, so I guess I could do 3000 yds in an hour. But My focus is really the 100. I desperately want to get under a minute this year. If I can do that, then I know I have a future as a sprinter, since this is my second season.

Because my intensity is high and rest periods longer, the volume ends up being less than 2000 yds. I would like to extend my workouts to 90 minutes, but I have time constraints.

I spend time in the gym (although I just heard Phelps say he does NO lifting) and also the bike. I think I have descent strength for sprinting.

poolraat
December 30th, 2006, 06:33 PM
I'm 42. .... But My focus is really the 100. I desperately want to get under a minute this year. If I can do that, then I know I have a future as a sprinter, since this is my second season.

I gave up running when in my mid 30's and started swimming in my late 40's.
You can get under a minute with 2000-3000 a day. I did at 53.

rtodd
December 30th, 2006, 07:10 PM
That is very good news. I just hope I can do the same. If I can get under a minute, that will be very good for my confidence.

Did you run sprints, middle distance, or distance?

poolraat
December 30th, 2006, 08:22 PM
That is very good news. I just hope I can do the same. If I can get under a minute, that will be very good for my confidence.

Did you run sprints, middle distance, or distance?

880, Mile and relays in high school. Longer stuff as I got older. On another thread you mentioned Masters track. I competed on the track until I was in my 30's. My best events were 1500 and 5000.

FlyQueen
December 30th, 2006, 08:51 PM
I'm 42.


I spend time in the gym (although I just heard Phelps say he does NO lifting) and also the bike. I think I have descent strength for sprinting.



I would think Phelps would be lifting now that he is at Michigan and older, I know he didnt' prior to 04 - he however, is NOT a sprinter ...

Timed Finals
December 30th, 2006, 09:12 PM
I think that I can clear up a lot of talk or just add some commentary to this thread. Up until age 13, I never swam in the summer. Only in the winters and spring and of course, it was not until I was 13 or so that I started seeing improvements.

At 13, I started swimming 6-8000 yds per day, and by age 15 was going in the 18-20,000 yds range per day. Four doubles a week and a total of 10 workouts. 1:50.9 in the 200m free my senior year.

Went to Texas and started doing 12-14,000 per day - saw improvement and eventually went 1:48.1 in the 200m free in 2000.

Then after I left Texas I went 10-12,000 per day and eventually even below that, and I never improved in my five years of swimming after that. I put a lot of stock in putting in the yardage at a young age... not "garbage" yardage, but quality hard work.

Now, I have been out of the water for almost 18 months, just had knee surgery, have gained 25 lbs. since I stopped swimming competitively, and would love to be able to get in the pool again and go 1500-2000 yds. per day 4-5 times per week.

And a note on Phelps... he did not do weights before he got to Michigan, but I would prefer to do the weights that I did over the torture that Bob put NBAC through in their dryland medicine ball program.

Concho Pearl
December 30th, 2006, 10:58 PM
I'm doing about 2000 in about 52 mins. That's all the time I have, my goal for the new year is to swim 3 times a week lifting weights on Sat.

Sometimes I just can't get a good swim in at the "Y" because the lap lane is full and the rest of the pool has all the kids in it for open swim. So I swim as much as I can, then work on turns and swimming under water for as long as possible then throw in some pool push ups and kicks. I figure I can always stand to work on the little things now and then.

knelson
December 30th, 2006, 11:48 PM
and would love to be able to get in the pool again and go 1500-2000 yds. per day 4-5 times per week.

Now, what Scott Goldblatt can do on 1500-2000 per day and what the rest of us can do might not be exactly the same!

However, I do think if rtodd's focus event is the 100 free, then he can probably get by on that kind of yardage assuming he's really emphasizing the quality stuff and getting in at least 4 days per week, preferably 5. I also think weights and other dryland will help you.

rtodd
December 31st, 2006, 10:00 AM
Scott,
I appreciate you even taking the time to reply to a thread started by a "ham and egger" like me. It really puts into context how little 2000 yds is.... I'm embarassed.

Knelson,
I suppose my schedule would allow for twice a day (during lunch and after work), which might be more advantageous for a sprinter. Then I could double my yardage.

Poolraat,
As scared as I was to run the 1/4, I would never touch the middle distance.

poolraat
December 31st, 2006, 10:11 AM
As scared as I was to run the 1/4, I would never touch the middle distance.

And I avoided the 1/4 like the plague. Nothing hurt worse than the final stretch. Not even hitting the wall at 21 mi in the marathon.

Timed Finals
December 31st, 2006, 01:14 PM
rtodd - 2000 is not a small amount. Get me in a pool and I would probably be hard pressed to finish that distance. Bottom line is that you can be fast with small amounts of yardage. Just be smart about how you do it. Focus on doing everything right and you can be just fine. If you hop in and "play" for 2000 yds, you could be in trouble.

scyfreestyler
December 31st, 2006, 02:06 PM
Bottom line is that you can be fast with small amounts of yardage. Just be smart about how you do it. Focus on doing everything right and you can be just fine. If you hop in and "play" for 2000 yds, you could be in trouble.


I agree with this wholeheartedly. If you swim a 400 warmup, a 200 cool off, and 1400 of hard sprints you are going to reap more benefit than somebody who swims 3-4 thousand yards with loose intervals and little attention to technique, starts, and turns. Be aware of you limited time in the water and make it count. I have very little time to devote to the pool these days so I can understand your dilemma. If I swim three times a week for 1500 to 2000 that is great for me. More often than not, it's about twice a week for 1500. I have made a decision that everytime I leave that pool, I will feel the pain. When I am driving home that night I can feel the soreness in my lats, triceps, and legs. This soreness is my indication that atrophy/hypertrophy is underway. One day when my kids are a little bigger and can transport themselves to all of their activities I will swim more but until then, it's quality over quantity.

BTW, my events are 50's and 100's with this limited yardage. I could probably pull off a decent 200 Free but I tend to stick with what I know.

jsmwbnc
February 26th, 2007, 09:48 PM
I didn't wanna start a new thread so I figured I would just dig up an old one that was the same topic. I"ve been doing some reading lately about doing aerobic work outside of the pool, ie. running, biking,, etc, and I was just wondering what everyone else's thoughts are about it. There is a similar debate on the race club forum but I wanted to hear from a wider range of people rather than just sprinters.

The Fortress
February 26th, 2007, 09:55 PM
I didn't wanna start a new thread so I figured I would just dig up an old one that was the same topic. I"ve been doing some reading lately about doing aerobic work outside of the pool, ie. running, biking,, etc, and I was just wondering what everyone else's thoughts are about it. There is a similar debate on the race club forum but I wanted to hear from a wider range of people rather than just sprinters.

I'm an ex-runner and I still run. I have to -- can't do mega yardage because of shoulder issues. Plus, I like it. (I'll have to go see what the Race Club says about it now, as I'm a sprinter and I am now intrigued.)

We had a big debate on the running issue a few months ago which can be found at:

http://forums.usms.org/showthread.php?t=6894&highlight=cross+training+running+swimming

I think there was a poll started shortly after that thread too. I'd have to hunt for that one.

I don't know about biking, as I don't do it. I do know that Allen Stark bikes a lot to save the knees and Jim Clemmons was a cyclist before he became a world champion. Maybe others can comment on cycling.

jsmwbnc
February 26th, 2007, 10:02 PM
I was a runner for 4 years before I started swimming. I ran xc 9-12 grade and track 9-11th grade (distance) and I started swimming seriously my senior year of high school.

The Fortress
February 26th, 2007, 10:05 PM
I was a runner for 4 years before I started swimming. I ran xc 9-12 grade and track 9-11th grade (distance) and I started swimming seriously my senior year of high school.

I was just a late bloomin' runner having fun with some road races. But what a great sport. My husband is a lifelong runner and my son is a zealot xc runner. So I have the Prefontaine photo flag waving in my house with a whole bookcase of running books. I think the flag says something like "I don't run a race to win. I run it to see who has the most guts." So I really love your signature!

jsmwbnc
February 26th, 2007, 10:10 PM
Pre was the man back in his day. Have you read any of his books or seen the movies? They are motivating for anything whether it be sports related or not.

blainesapprentice
February 26th, 2007, 10:21 PM
I try to do a lot of cross training when I am not swimming for college or a team. I still try to do 5000 yards in the pool, but build up my running endurance at the same time. Over the summer I dont get as much opportunity to swim so I run more....but honestly, this summer I swam very little yardage a day and ran quite a bit, but I definatly was not in swimming shape when I came back to school in the fall.

The Fortress
February 26th, 2007, 10:23 PM
Are you kidding? Every book. Every movie. Awhile ago, I finished the Lore of Running. That was massive. I recently read Duel in the Sun and Ovette and Coe: The Record Breaking Rivalry.

Please do not lead me down the hijacking road or I will be scolded. :rofl: Can't some biker chime in real quick like?

Go check out that thread and let me know what you think after reading it.


Pre was the man back in his day. Have you read any of his books or seen the movies? They are motivating for anything whether it be sports related or not.

jsmwbnc
February 26th, 2007, 10:28 PM
I will read it sometime tomorrow but I'm about to get in the bed now. Thanks for posting.

FlyQueen
February 26th, 2007, 11:23 PM
The new sig is a Pre quote ... what a tragedy ... such a talent ...

Slowswim
February 27th, 2007, 09:57 AM
Last year I did for a Ironman 70.3 (that's a 1.2 mile swim). I swam 3-4K twice a week. My coach kept the intervals varied for, 25-200, and only one long swim (1500m). So 1.5 - 2K should be plenty for an endurance base for a 100m. The rest is technique.

The cross training aspect: I ran 3xweek (track, tempo, LSD) and biked twice a week: (10-20miles midweek and 50-70 on weekend); must have aided my swim. I felt too strong coming out for it to have been the swimming alone.

The swim was open water and in a wet suit, but my time was 32 minutes. There has to be a huge cross training effect.

Someone once told me a, "strong, swimmer will beat a weak swimmer, but a smart swimmer will beat a strong swimmer."

m2tall2
February 27th, 2007, 10:09 AM
As I just said in another post, I am trying to add in a bit more cross training. So far I've already seen what I consider dramatic improvements. I'm 3 weeks in right now. I'm going to do a 2-1/2 to 3 week mini-taper starting next week though so I'm going to cut back a bit on the cross training. After that I'm going to jump right back in. I'll let people know how it goes. But right now I am convinced that for my events and the amount of time I am able to spend in the pool, cross training is the way for me to go. Especially to help build my base...I'm not quite there yet.