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Gerdrick
January 3rd, 2007, 11:42 AM
Is it possible to compete with a nose clip on?
Due to some sinus problems (so the doc thinks) I need to swim with a nose clip which is ok if I swim just for me, but a couple weeks ago our coach mentioned something about a some competition in the summer...... I feel so stupid wearing this thing on my nose..... Am I the only one? If there a better way to fix my sinus problem? Can it be related to the pool water or am I just making it up? :frustrated:

craiglll@yahoo.com
January 3rd, 2007, 01:14 PM
When I was 4 yrs old, my nose was broken. thej as an adult, I've had two operations to remove nasal polyps. I always use a clip. I use the large size for sync swimming. It works really well. I have polyps right now but they are kept small becuse I'm not blowing out through my nose. The other kind with the strap don't seem to fit my nose.

I order 12 at a time because of th ediscount at Kiefer's and because I lose them easily.

Redbird Alum
January 3rd, 2007, 01:21 PM
If you need one to remain comfortable or prevent health issues, by all means use one. I have swum with alot of people who use clips regularly, and seen plenty used at meets.

blainesapprentice
January 3rd, 2007, 07:25 PM
My college coach requires that all our backstrokers wear nose clips in practice and strongly suggests they use them at meets as well. (and about half do!). I wear a nose clip when I am swimming with a swim snorkel. Lots of people do it:-D!

~Wren~
January 3rd, 2007, 08:10 PM
My college coach requires that all our backstrokers wear nose clips in practice and strongly suggests they use them at meets as well. (and about half do!). I wear a nose clip when I am swimming with a swim snorkel. Lots of people do it:-D!

Why? Oh, that would drive me nuts!

islandsox
January 3rd, 2007, 08:43 PM
My college coach requires that all our backstrokers wear nose clips in practice and strongly suggests they use them at meets as well. (and about half do!). I wear a nose clip when I am swimming with a swim snorkel. Lots of people do it:-D!

I, too, want to know why a coach would require a nose clip for backstroke, that makes no sense to me. It surely has nothing to do with speed or technique. I need to inhale and exhale out of both my nose and mouth because I can take in more and release more. So even if people are doing it, why?

Donna

nancytris
January 3rd, 2007, 09:35 PM
I bought and used my first nose clip ever this week. I am sooooo glad I did. For the first time in forever I did not sneeze and blow for hours after my swim! That was so refreshing. I had been so convinced that I would not be able to swim wearing a nose clip!! Then I read somewhere here "you will be surprised how quickly you get used to it" and decided to try one. Now I am a convert :applaud:

Craig -- being new to nose clips;) I am not familiar that they come in sizes. Is there a particular site I can visit to check this out.


Thanks, Nancy

Rob Copeland
January 4th, 2007, 07:54 AM
IIt surely has nothing to do with speed or technique. It has everything to do with speed and maybe a little to do with reducing sinus infections.

It has been demonstrated at the elite level, the underwater breakout is the faster than surface backstroke. Also the underwater backstroke breakout requires the swimmer to 1) have a constant exaltation through the nose, 2) allow copious amounts of water to flow into their nasal cavity, or 3) block the flow of inrushing water.

Typically swimmers who choose option 1 have subsequently shorter breakouts as the race progresses; the need for air drives them to the surface and the exaltation reduces stored air volume and buoyancy. Option 2 often leads to coughing and spewing. Option 3 (nose clips) is the most effective option and not sneezing afterwards is an added bonus.

When I race backstroke with a nose clip, I usually add 4 to 5 yards to each breakout over non-clipped races.

Superfly
January 4th, 2007, 08:25 AM
yeah, right...that must be the reason why all the Phelps and Thorps are frequently seen with those clips in big meets ;)

Seriously. I dont think that this has an impact at all on speed under normal circumstances, but if you have problems controlling the outflow of air, then yes definately there is most likely a big impact on the time you can spend under water.

/Per

Larry_55
January 4th, 2007, 09:41 AM
I use them for the same reasons nancytris uses them and have not found them to cause me any problems and maybe prevent some. As for breathing I subscribe to the theory (personal-no citations here) that the larger the openng the more air one can effectively move. Yes the nasal passsages can contribute, but is it worth the hassle considering the much smaller diameter of the canals. Factor in the problems listed by nancytris and these are my rationales for using noseplugs. Good luck.

nkfrench
January 4th, 2007, 02:51 PM
It has been demonstrated at the elite level, the underwater breakout is the faster than surface backstroke. Also the underwater backstroke breakout requires the swimmer to 1) have a constant exaltation through the nose, 2) allow copious amounts of water to flow into their nasal cavity, or 3) block the flow of inrushing water.

Some swimmers will have option 3A. If I make a certain facial expression (the "something stinks" look) it blocks the nose without need for a clip. Only time having a deviated septum comes in handy. I can kick u/w on my back without having to exhale anything significant (no noticeable bubbles)

Gerdrick
January 5th, 2007, 09:48 AM
Thank you all so very much! I don't feel so odd anymore...:D
Does anyone know a good site for clips? I have 2 kinds: just a moon shaped one from TYR and the one with metal strip in the middle and rubber ends from Speedo. The first one keeps slipping off my nose and the second one works OK but hurts my nose a bit when I put it on.

craiglll@yahoo.com (craiglll@yahoo.com) how do you pick correct size and who makes such great clips? Thank you.
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Frank Thompson
January 5th, 2007, 12:28 PM
Rob:

I read your hypothesis on the nose clip for the backstroke. If you believe this theory to be true, wouldn't these same observations for backstroke be true for freestyle? Is it because we are face down that this theory would not work for free? Everything you stated about maximizing the underwater breakouts over surface swimming would be true in freestyle. Michael Phelps is a perfect example of this as an elite swimmer when he swims free. Perhaps because the dolphin kick on your back is harder, faster and more strenuous with streamling requiring more oxgen?

Also, when you raced backstroke with the nose clip, what race distance did you swim that allowed you to have the 4 to 5 yard advantage over swimming with non nose clips? I have experimented with nose clips and have found some interesting observations while using them and will share these observations with what I found out soon. I don't want to highjack this thread so I will report these findings on another thread.

I have never seen you swim backstroke and I am not trying to be funny, but I recall I read here on the forums that you said you got disqualified at the 2004 LC Nationals doing the 50 back in a relay for going beyond the 15 meter mark on your breakout at the begining of the race. I have never seen anybody do that yet in masters and if this is true then maybe you do need the nose clip to stay under that long. That is quite an accomplishment in itself to do that and be able to sprint a good 50 back and not be in oxgen bankruptcy while swimming on the surface.

meldyck
January 5th, 2007, 12:41 PM
Skip,

Rob's observation is right on the money for my experience with backstroke. When I don't exhale, water flows right in. When I do exhale it keeps out the water but shortens the breakout.

With freestyle, I don't have to exhale and water doesn't flow into the head. I'm presuming that this is purely the orientation of the body and how the water pressure acts in the nasal passages. When you are on your back, water can easily displace the oxygen in your nose and get into the head.
When you are on your stomach, the trapped air bubble is much harder to displace from the nose, so freestyle is easier without the need for a nose clip.

You can think of this as an open jar submerged: If the mouth of the (open) jar is down (toward the bottom), the air trapped in the jar will remain (like freestyle). If the jar mouth is pointed up, the air escapes and water enters.

-- mel

FlyQueen
January 5th, 2007, 12:45 PM
For a 50 back I can easily go 15m out and then turn and swim 15m underwater again, bringing my swimming grand total to 20 yards. I have trouble doing this on the 100, but I'm working on it.

I love underwater SDK on my back that's the only reason I started swimming backstroke. If you want to be able to do 15 on every turn for a 100 or 200 start working on the lung capacity, do it in practice so you can do it in a meet!

Frank Thompson
January 5th, 2007, 02:05 PM
Skip,

Rob's observation is right on the money for my experience with backstroke. When I don't exhale, water flows right in. When I do exhale it keeps out the water but shortens the breakout.

With freestyle, I don't have to exhale and water doesn't flow into the head. I'm presuming that this is purely the orientation of the body and how the water pressure acts in the nasal passages. When you are on your back, water can easily displace the oxygen in your nose and get into the head.
When you are on your stomach, the trapped air bubble is much harder to displace from the nose, so freestyle is easier without the need for a nose clip.

You can think of this as an open jar submerged: If the mouth of the (open) jar is down (toward the bottom), the air trapped in the jar will remain (like freestyle). If the jar mouth is pointed up, the air escapes and water enters.

-- mel

Mel:

This makes sense to me. When the body is submerged on the stomach with your nose facing downward as opposted to upward on your back, gravity will aid the body so oxgen will be harder to exit and water would be harder to enter your nose as opposted to when your on your back and gravity will not work for you, thus the nose clips will combat what gravity can't do for you. However, do you feel there is a cost associated with having the nose clip on when swimming on the surface and not being able to breath with both the mouth and the nose.

The reason I bring this up is because I have never seen any of the elite swimmers recently use nose clips for there races especially in the 100 and 200 distances of backstroke. Perhaps the 50 back, but I don't recall who they are.

Two things come to mine when thinking about this.

1. That the oxgen cost of swimming on the surface is worth to much to save oxgen on the turns, especially in a Long Course 100 and 200 Back when using the nose clip.

2. That the elite swimmers are so good at staying under water for long time, that they would not need the nose clip and it would not hinder the breathing pattern with the mouth and nose working together.

Of course if a masters swimmer can't stay under for that period of time and thus gets water up the nose a lot, then the cost of not breathing on the surface thru the nose would be worth the use of the nose clip.

Frank Thompson
January 5th, 2007, 02:31 PM
For a 50 back I can easily go 15m out and then turn and swim 15m underwater again, bringing my swimming grand total to 20 yards. I have trouble doing this on the 100, but I'm working on it.

I love underwater SDK on my back that's the only reason I started swimming backstroke. If you want to be able to do 15 on every turn for a 100 or 200 start working on the lung capacity, do it in practice so you can do it in a meet!


FlyQueen:

This is exactly why I asked what distance was being swam when using the nose clips. You didn't say anything about using nose clips so I assume you swim 2/3 of the 50 back without them. I have seen a lot of people go the 15 meters but not exceed it. I have seen more do it in short course then in long course as you would expect. I have also seen more people do it longer in the 100 and 200's in short course as opposed to long course.

The question becomes is this benefical to a masters swimmer racing in the 100 and 200 distances? Will the cost of oxgen swimming underwater affect the surface swimming when you need your speed, endurance, and technique to get you thru the races. It makes sense to go the limit underwater because its faster, but can an aging masters swimmer do this and not have other factors that hinder performance?

When I was at the World meet this summer I saw very few people do this in the 200 meter backstroke on the 2nd and 3rd turns. For that matter on the 200 fly, I didn't see anybody go the maximum 15 meters on all three turns and I specifically watched for this. This tells me that as a masters swimmer, the cost of oxgen in a race is more important for your speed to bring home a race then doing underwater turns and submerging and going into oxgen bankruptcy and not having the speed or stamina to bring the race home. Of course this wouldn't apply to a lot of the elite Olympic swimmers because they can master this and have the lung capacity and not be in oxgen bankruptcy.

I have never been able to do this very well in a long course 200 back because as I surface after the 100 and 150 turns I have no speed because I am trying to recover my oxgen from being underwater SDK for a prolonged time.

The Fortress
January 5th, 2007, 03:03 PM
This is exactly why I asked what distance was being swam when using the nose clips. You didn't say anything about using nose clips so I assume you swim 2/3 of the 50 back without them. I have seen a lot of people go the 15 meters but not exceed it. I have seen more do it in short course then in long course as you would expect. I have also seen more people do it longer in the 100 and 200's in short course as opposed to long course.

The question becomes is this benefical to a masters swimmer racing in the 100 and 200 distances? Will the cost of oxgen swimming underwater affect the surface swimming when you need your speed, endurance, and technique to get you thru the races. It makes sense to go the limit underwater because its faster, but can an aging masters swimmer do this and not have other factors that hinder performance?

When I was at the World meet this summer I saw very few people do this in the 200 meter backstroke on the 2nd and 3rd turns. For that matter on the 200 fly, I didn't see anybody go the maximum 15 meters on all three turns and I specifically watched for this. This tells me that as a masters swimmer, the cost of oxgen in a race is more important for your speed to bring home a race then doing underwater turns and submerging and going into oxgen bankruptcy and not having the speed or stamina to bring the race home.

Frank:

I agree. I can stay underwater much longer on the 50. But on the 100 I can't stay under as long except maybe on the start. But Heather is only 26, so she may have a little more juice than us.

I'd also like to know if nose clips really cut down on sinus infections or only marginally like Rob said. It sounds painful, but I might consider one if this were true.

FlyQueen
January 5th, 2007, 03:05 PM
I do not use a nose clip, but if I swim a lot backstroke in practice and all that water goes up my nose my sense of taste is off the next day ... :dunno:

I believe Jerri Moss a 2005 World Champs team member in both backstrokes wore/wears a nose plug. I think she's retired but I'm not sure ...

I have seen some very impressive underwater work from some "elite" masters swimmers. When a teammate of mine swims the 200 fly he is close to blowing past the 15m mark off the start is close to 15 on each turn, this is short course. He finds it easier to stay underwater because it's less swimming.

All my backstroke racing, which is very limited, I know I could easily pop 20 off of the start and probably another 15 off of the second wall. In practice when we race every once in awhile I pop up at the flags - the far ones(we don't have any markings at the 15 mark).

AnnG
January 6th, 2007, 11:42 AM
I have been using a nose clip for several years, primarily so I could swim longer underwater on my back. I am able to keep my air longer and my legs don't give out on me as quickly in a backstroke race. While it did take me a while to get used to breathing differently, ie not using my nostrils, I have been able to get much farther underwater on my back. The surprize benefit is the health of my sinuses, I don't feel all plugged up and sneezy after practice as before. I only use it for backstroke (and IM's) and take it off for other events and during practice unless I am swimming backstroke. I don't need it unless I am inverted underwater. I put a nose clip on my 10 year old daughter who would not put her face in the water at all, she then whipped through all the swimming lessons the pool offered in one summer. Maybe I can keep my mind on other things when I don't have to worry about a nasal flush, yech!
Call me a convert, at about three bucks for a good synchro clip its worth a try for anyone.

Rob Copeland
January 6th, 2007, 03:02 PM
Also, when you raced backstroke with the nose clip, what race distance did you swim that allowed you to have the 4 to 5 yard advantage over swimming with non nose clips?

I recall I read here on the forums that you said you got disqualified at the 2004 LC Nationals doing the 50 back in a relay for going beyond the 15 meter mark on your breakout at the begining of the race.

Skip, your memory/recall never ceases to amaze me.

Yes, I was DQ’ed for exceeding 15 meters in a relay at Savannah, and this was without my nose clip.

And while I don’t frequently race backstroke, I will throw a 200 back in every now and then. As for adding 4-5 meters, this is in the 200 back where without a nose clip I’m usually up just past the flags on the back half, and with one on I will go nearly half a length (SCY).

nancytris
January 6th, 2007, 03:28 PM
This is a little off where the topic seems to have gone :) , but back to the rudiments of nose clips --- I found Keifer site and viewed the nose clips they offer. There are three "styles" (who knew?) and I am wondering if those of you who have used this brand have a preference, or experience with one or all and can give word of advice? Now that I am a total believer and convert to nose clip use, I would like to experience a bit more comfort than the Speedo brand is offering.

Thanks, Nancy

craiglll@yahoo.com
January 6th, 2007, 04:20 PM
I buty them from Keifer. I get the ones they make and I buy 12 at a tiem. they are for synco swimmers. There are 2 sized. the small ones I have only found in a catalogue the SCAT webpage. They are really small. I must have a big nose (doesn't look that big to me) because I have to take the large ones & stretch them.

As for the entry about swimming on your back underwater. taht's how I learned to kick for butterfly.

The Fortress
January 6th, 2007, 06:40 PM
I buty them from Keifer. I get the ones they make and I buy 12 at a tiem. they are for synco swimmers. There are 2 sized. the small ones I have only found in a catalogue the SCAT webpage. They are really small. I must have a big nose (doesn't look that big to me) because I have to take the large ones & stretch them.

As for the entry about swimming on your back underwater. taht's how I learned to kick for butterfly.

Craig:

I have been doing some research on the website since I've been having a lot of trouble with my sinuses since I starting swimming again. (I also have terrible allergies.) I see that you have always answered everyone's questions on every new thread on this topic. I've concluded that I need to use saline sprays/rinses and try nose clips. I just wanted to thank you for all the advice that you've given over and over.

lapswimmr
January 6th, 2007, 09:54 PM
Nose clips are goofy.. so are my swim goggles or for that matter any swim goggles! But I wear them as I am not a "Hollywood" heads up swimmer. I have used a nose clip plenty of times. Its for the pool not going to the supermarket! LOL! Don't worry lots of us have the same troubles time to time. Nose plugs,swimcaps goggles , real swimmers use them all.

nancytris
January 6th, 2007, 10:23 PM
Nose plugs,swimcaps goggles , real swimmers use them all.

Yes, just yesterday I chuckled to myself as I went through the inventory of what I was putting on... Heart Rate monitor (check); swim cap (check); ear plugs (check), goggles (check); nose clip (check); (newly:rolleyes: ) SwiMP3 (check)... What a simple sport! No wonder those runners seem to have such an easy start!

Gerdrick
January 8th, 2007, 01:25 PM
Thank you all for your support and great information! :applaud:

Justin
January 8th, 2007, 04:01 PM
http://www.outdoorplace.org/paddling/Odds/Nose-clips.htm

you can make'em yourself! :2cents:

craiglll@yahoo.com
January 9th, 2007, 04:33 PM
Craig:

I have been doing some research on the website since I've been having a lot of trouble with my sinuses since I starting swimming again. (I also have terrible allergies.) I see that you have always answered everyone's questions on every new thread on this topic. I've concluded that I need to use saline sprays/rinses and try nose clips. I just wanted to thank you for all the advice that you've given over and over.

Thank you, few people realize that I know everything, except how to type well. The reason I respond is because I know that many doctors don't understand allergies nor nasal pasages, let alone us common swimmers. From all of the research I've done, I am convinced that many of the people who have nasal problems when swimming are either blowing out too hard through their noses, have mild sinus infections, or have polyps in their sinus cavities. Last spring my ENT put me on antibiotics for about one month & prednisone. My polyps shrunk and I still don't have any problems.

craiglll@yahoo.com
January 9th, 2007, 04:34 PM
http://www.outdoorplace.org/paddling/Odds/Nose-clips.htm

you can make'em yourself! :2cents:

Why on earth would you go to that much trouble?

nancytris
January 9th, 2007, 07:31 PM
From all of the research I've done, I am convinced that many of the people who have nasal problems when swimming are either blowing out too hard through their noses, ...

Now that I read this Craig, I think that is exactly what I had been doing. AND I thought it was what I should be doing. So thank you for clearing this up!

Nose clips are it!!:bow: :bow:

Muppet
January 9th, 2007, 09:23 PM
When I was at the World meet this summer I saw very few people do this in the 200 meter backstroke on the 2nd and 3rd turns. For that matter on the 200 fly, I didn't see anybody go the maximum 15 meters on all three turns and I specifically watched for this.\

Frank, you should come to Colonies Zone meets. I missed his worlds race, but Michael Ross from New England Masters (he's 38 I believe) seems to be a BIG proponent of taking the max underwater. Only on the last 25 of his 200s does he seem to come up any earlier than the 15 meters. I used to be a big fan of backstroke, gave it up and am kinda getting back into it again, and have been secretly (until now) watching most of his races for tips. He's got an amazing stroke, is incredibly powerful underwater, and also seems like a nice guy.

Frank Thompson
January 11th, 2007, 02:56 PM
Hello Muppet:

I am very well aware of Michael Ross or "Lets Race" as he is called on these forums and you couldn't pick a better example in USMS of someone perfecting undulation speed through breakout and SDK for maximum breakout. I saw both his 50 Back and 100 meter back at the World Meet. I have not seen him in a 200 meter back and would be interested to see if he could hit the 15 meter mark with all of the turns.

I also remember when he was the fastest 50 yard backstroker in the world in 1990. He swam for Princeton and there 200 Medley relay repeated as NCAA Champions in 1989 and 1990. What I remember is that he swam the whole race underwater and came up for a breath at the 25 turn and at the finish. Back then you could do this because there was no 15 meter regulation. I remember that relay well because he was 4th in the 100 Back and beat the 3 guys (Rouse,Thibault, and Zubero) in the 50 in the relay by almost a half a second by going :21.81 and getting Princeton a nice lead to break the US Open record going 1:27.31. I believe for the 50 back he was easily the equal of David Berkoff because I believe his best time was :21.6 and I don't think Berkoff was much faster than that for a 50. Berkoff, also know as "Blastoff" on the college swimming forums and righly so, revolutionalized backstroke technique by racing the first 35 to 40 meters of the 100 meter backstroke underwater, becoming the first swimmer ever under 55 seconds. These two are about as good as it gets and there are others out there that have mastered this style with the new regulations.

The point is that not all masters swimmers can be like Mike or David for that matter, but can try to incorporate techniques for improvements. One point that swimmers must accept is that lung capacity diminishes with age so that is one inhibitor that we must accept while trying to perfect this. I think one has to know what there limits are with there VO2 Max and be able to keep there stroke smooth and stable in the face of anxiety and physiological adversity. Maybe a lot of hypoxic training along with doing a lot of SDK in practice can help with extended dolphin kicks of the wall to 15 meters. I have also heard that fin kicking is great for this and forces flexibility with the body staying horizontal through the breakout making it easier for streamlining while increasing core body strength. I guess the best way to test this is to experiement in practice and re-create the stress that the body experiences during a race.

I am still not sure about the nose clip because even though it provides relief when having difficulty in balancing the pressure of air inside your nose with that of water outside the nose, when swimming on the surface you cut off that oxygen that you could generate thru the nose making it kind of an unnatural breathing technique that your not used to doing when swimming at high speeds.

Gerdrick
January 24th, 2007, 02:53 PM
I am still not sure about the nose clip because even though it provides relief when having difficulty in balancing the pressure of air inside your nose with that of water outside the nose, when swimming on the surface you cut off that oxygen that you could generate thru the nose making it kind of an unnatural breathing technique that your not used to doing when swimming at high speeds.

I guess it is naturall for me to breath through the mouth only - it's a professional flutist's thing. :)

craiglll@yahoo.com
January 24th, 2007, 02:57 PM
There is another reason water gets inthe sinus cavities. During a flip the water pressure changes. If you flip too slowly, the water pressure change will push water into your nose. Most people breath out through their nose at this tiem. If you don't, the water rushes in.

SwimStud
January 24th, 2007, 03:05 PM
There is another reason water gets inthe sinus cavities. During a flip the water pressure changes. If you flip too slowly, the water pressure change will push water into your nose. Most people breath out through their nose at this tiem. If you don't, the water rushes in.

hmmm Wise men say only fools rush in....


:rofl:
"Thank you, thank you! I'll be here all week."

Muppet
January 24th, 2007, 03:20 PM
There is another reason water gets inthe sinus cavities. During a flip the water pressure changes. If you flip too slowly, the water pressure change will push water into your nose. Most people breath out through their nose at this tiem. If you don't, the water rushes in.

hmmm, maybe thats why i got a sinus infection... well that settles it. no more flip turns! from now on, my 500 will feature 19 open turns. :wiggle:

FlyQueen
January 24th, 2007, 05:06 PM
hmmm, maybe thats why i got a sinus infection... well that settles it. no more flip turns! from now on, my 500 will feature 19 open turns. :wiggle:

Have you ever tried it that way? I had some lower back issues a few months a go and it hurt to flip turn so I did open turns instead ... it was SO tiring ... I don't know how people do it. It takes longer (duh!) and takes so much more energy ... blech

Muppet
January 25th, 2007, 12:28 AM
Have you ever tried it that way? I had some lower back issues a few months a go and it hurt to flip turn so I did open turns instead ... it was SO tiring ... I don't know how people do it. It takes longer (duh!) and takes so much more energy ... blech

I think the last time I did that many open turns at once was back when I was 16, literally just getting into swimming. I joined this program to swim 1-2 times a week the fall before I started my first year of HS swimming. One night, they had us doing a T-30. I had never done anything longer than ~150 or so at a time to that point. It was exhausting and I started doing a lot of open turns. It was a long swim - i got lapped at least 4x by these 11-12 year-old bimbos in my lane.

The Fortress
June 5th, 2007, 12:01 AM
I have been trying to use a nose clip to cut down on sinus infections because swimming has definitely been making me ill. (Don't have one now, thankfully.) I've used them with very limited success. When they stay on, I can definitely stay underwater longer on backstroke. No contest. But I can't seem to keep them on at all. I've tried the synchro and speedo ones. They don't stay on my nose. I'm not wearing a strap. What the heck am I doing wrong?

Peter Cruise
June 5th, 2007, 02:47 AM
Leslie- if you would stop snorting underwater in response to remembering forums hilarity your noseclip would probably stay on instead of becoming a high velocity projectile...

AnnG
June 7th, 2007, 03:51 AM
Fortress, this may sound really basic but make sure you have the noseplug on facing the right way, with the rubberized flares facing away from you and the wire flush against the bridge of your nose. When I first started experimenting with the nose plug it was hurting me and I had trouble keeping it on my nose. I happened to see a synchro demonstration (at the 99 SCY nationals at Santa Clara) and saw the swimmer up close and realized I had been wearing the clip backwards - a real "a-ha" (or maybe "duh") moment for me.
Also try the different sizes to find the one that works for you. I like the Speedo clips because they are smaller. Also when its not on my nose I wear it on my left ring finger with the wire tucked underneath my wedding ring, I can swim fly or sprint free and not worry about losing it. Works great for meet warmups too.

craiglll@yahoo.com
June 12th, 2007, 09:19 AM
Right now I am sitting at my desk at work realizing that I forgot to do my flFnase this mornig. My sinuses are draining yet they feal as if there is a gallon of water in them. This can only mean that polyps are enlarged. The only good thing about going to the ENT is that she will deaden my sinus cavities & I will be able to breathewith my mouth closed.

Mia Kopela
July 19th, 2007, 03:32 AM
I have recently (as in a few workouts ago) converted to the Nose Clip club. I positively look like a witch but I'm going to stick with it as I can't really do dolphin kicking without it comfortably.

ensignada
July 20th, 2007, 05:51 PM
I have recently (as in a few workouts ago) converted to the Nose Clip club. I positively look like a witch but I'm going to stick with it as I can't really do dolphin kicking without it comfortably.

Welcome to the club. Be aware that they are addictive!

JennyS
July 24th, 2007, 04:37 PM
Hi, Gerdrick. Nose clips aren't so bad to compete with. You get a definite advantage over your competitors off the walls. If you want a stylish nose clip, check out this site http://www.swimoutlet.com/Ear_Nose_Plugs_s/333.htm . Speedo makes some cute ones. Good luck!

ProfLeaf
August 29th, 2013, 08:56 AM
I had literally given up swimming (what I call swimming) and really missed it terribly, especially open water on a specific lake (Boerne) near here. Then the miracle, nose clips. Rapture, ecstasy, epiphany. I became complacent and used them always. Two days ago I lost them crossing back from the other shore (freestyle, 800 meters over, then 800 back). I have had sleepless nights of suffocating, days of sinus congestion and burning. I will never, EVER EVER swim without clips, EVER again... as in NEVER EVER!

__steve__
August 29th, 2013, 12:04 PM
Started using them about a year ago for backstroke. Don't know if it's a good thing, but I am now 100% dependent on them for all swimming. Don't use them in the shower, yet.

Sporti are the best for me