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archi609
January 12th, 2007, 04:47 PM
I'm 56 years old, swimming three times a week. The distance is one mile in 33 minutes. I feel I should be swimming faster. Is 33 min. mile slow for my age, need some feedback.:confused:

FlyQueen
January 12th, 2007, 05:00 PM
I'm swimming three times a week. The distance is one mile in 33 minutes. I feel I should be swimming faster. Is 33 min. mile slow for my age, need some feedback.:confused:

How old are you?

geochuck
January 12th, 2007, 05:11 PM
33 min for a mile is slow for almost any age group. But it is a good speed fo a person who is not a good swimmer.

dorothyrde
January 13th, 2007, 08:19 AM
I'm swimming three times a week. The distance is one mile in 33 minutes. I feel I should be swimming faster. Is 33 min. mile slow for my age, need some feedback.:confused:

If you are always swimming a mile straight 3 times a week, I think your body adjusts and gets used to the pace and keeps going at that pace. If you want to improve your time, you might want to mix your work-outs up and do some interval work. Looking at some of the work-outs on the work-out forum might help.

As far as what the optimal speed is, who knows. The fact you are getting in and working out, is what is important. You should be competing against yourself, and test if you are improving your time, and your fitness level. Other factors besides speed mark this, like heart rate,the ease in which you swim the 33 minutes.

swimr4life
January 13th, 2007, 12:07 PM
I'm swimming three times a week. The distance is one mile in 33 minutes. I feel I should be swimming faster. Is 33 min. mile slow for my age, need some feedback.:confused:

It's all relative! How long have you been swimming? What are your goals? Are you planning on competing in a meet, competing in an open water race or are you just swimming for fitness?

rtodd
January 13th, 2007, 01:04 PM
Depends on how you define fast. Maybe considered slow, but you may not be a "slow" swimmer. If you are in tremendous shape and have been swimming 3x a week for a long time (how old are you?), then perhaps your technique is suffering and you are not swimming efficiently. If you are a relatively new swimmer, timing your mile could be discouraging since it takes tremendous strength and endurance to keep your form for 1650yds (are you holding an even pace?). You are better off getting a time for the 300yd including your 100 splits. This could be more revealing of your "speed" and efficiency as a swimmer.

My 1000 yd time is roughly 18 minutes, so I am roughly in the same boat as you, but I can do 100 intervals at a 1:15 pace and plan on going under a minute for the 100 at my next meet (not seriously fast, but fast enough). So my pace slows considerably when I have to swim distance.

geochuck
January 13th, 2007, 06:54 PM
1 mile in 33 minutes, works out to a little over 1:50 plus per 100 yards. That time is slow for a champion swimmer, but is ok for someone who is starting out. If you want to be the top of your age group you will more than likely have to swim much faster. Unless you are very young or very old. I am 73 years old and would swim around 27 minutes for a mile without major work. But in my hay day I was much faster close to 20 min a mile. So it is what you consider fast and do you want to become faster.

ensignada
January 13th, 2007, 08:14 PM
Thanks, George, your response was helpful to me too. I'm too new to swimming to have much of a feel for what's a decent speed for a mile, and I have wondered. After I get the yardage up, I'll be working on speeding up. Now I have a few parameters to work from.

geochuck
January 14th, 2007, 06:47 AM
We should remember that 1 mile is 1760 yards not 1650yards.

To swim 1 mile here is what you have to average per 100

20 min - 1:08

22 min - 1:15

24 min - 1:21

27 min - 1:32

On another thread someone mentioned swimming in a pool you rest on your turns, it is easier than swimming a mile of openwater swimming. I do not believe that you must make your turns count and use great effort in the turns.

ensignada
January 14th, 2007, 10:43 AM
On another thread someone mentioned swimming in a pool you rest on your turns, it is easier than swimming a mile of openwater swimming. I do not believe that you must make your turns count and use great effort in the turns.

Yes, this had occured to me. While I don't have any immediate plans to swim OW (although there is a little ocean not too far from here), I was planning on doing some long course work in over the summer when I visit my mother in Indianapolis. By then a mile (or two, I hope) won't be an issue on a short course, and I'm curious to see how it feels long.

rtodd
January 14th, 2007, 12:24 PM
I was thinking meters per mile...which as it turns out is actually 1609.334 meters/mile. I have no idea where the 1650 came from......sounds like archie609 lost interest anyway.

geochuck
January 14th, 2007, 02:39 PM
In a yard pool the closest you can come to swimming 1500m is 1650 yards. Many have called the 1650 the metric mile. When we had races they would have the mile race, 1760 yards, so in preperation for the Olympics they swam 1650 yards

archi609
January 15th, 2007, 02:28 PM
I think you so right, the fact that I'm working my heart and lungs is the key t better health. I started swimming Oct 06' a 37 minute mile, now I'm 33 minute, my body did ajust to that speed. Thanks

archi609
January 15th, 2007, 02:53 PM
Thanks, your information was helpful and incouraging.