PDA

View Full Version : Some beginner questions: What kind of cross-training do you do? 2. How to find goggle



BabsVa
January 30th, 2007, 01:32 PM
s that actually work and do not leave deep rings around the eyes?

My training goes like this at this point:

Mon: run 1 or 2 miles on treadmill
swim 1 hour w/coach

Tues: longer run or other aerobic exercise for about an hour
weight training for about an hour

Wed: same as Monday

Thurs:
same as Tuesday

Friday:
run for an hour
swim (no coach and much less disciplined) about 45 minutes

Sat:
core work for an hour (Pilates)

Sun:
often no time to workout at all, sometimes an hour run or aerobics class

Thanks for your thoughts!

waves101
January 31st, 2007, 08:29 AM
Personally, my cross-training is limited. What little I do is confined to either the weight room or the result of other activities (hunting, fishing, etc. - a lot of walking). As far as goggles go, the best thing to do is try several brands and models at a sporting goods store. If they adhere to your eye sockets (even for a short time) without using the strap, then they are worth a try. The last time I changed brands I tried about 20 different pairs before I found the right ones. For me, its the View Sniper by TUSA.

FindingMyInnerFish
January 31st, 2007, 08:29 AM
I am less experienced than a lot of people here, but wanted to bump up your thread hoping others more experienced will respond.

Cross training

I swim the same number of days per week, although with the craziness of my schedule, most of my swimming is on weekends: back to back masters' practices on Sat. and Sun., as well as an uncoached swim Wed. evening. The Sat. practice is an hour long and on alternating weekends, I add more before/after. Sun. practice is two hours and usually there's no time before/after to add more. Sometimes, though I can add a few mins. before the practice starts. Wed. is about 45 mins. to an hour uncoached. On that day, I keep it fairly simple, adding drills here and there if the lane traffic allows.

Since I'm also a runner, the running remains important to me and takes up the other days, as well as some of the swimming days. (On alternating weekends when I'm not swimming long, I run long--this varies depending on what race I'm training for--currently a half marathon, so I'm gradually increasing my distance to 2-2.5 hours run.)

I should but usually don't do weight work. How do you like the Pilates. Thinking of taking a class eventually but the days classes are offered at my Y often are days something else is going on or I'm working.

Bottom line is that I think it's a matter of your goals and priorities. I started masters' swimming mainly out of curiosity and looking for some good quality cross training for running. Then the swim coach talked me into an ocean swim. Lately I'm aiming for a swim of five and a quarter miles in August. This might be a pipe dream, but it's one that keeps me motivated to increase my distance and work on my stroke. Yet also want to keep setting running goals. Later in the year, November, aiming for a marathon run. I figure the swimming has already given me some great endurance and strength. My running workouts are better quality now, and I think it's b/c of the swimming.

***

Goggles

Hah! I've decided the "raccoon look" is pretty inevitable. Had a great pair of Barracuda goggles that did a nice job keeping water out and were reasonably comfortable, but lost them during an open water swim... if you're ever swimming in Wildwood's sunset lake and you find them, they're yours! :D

Now I'm using a cheapie pair of tinted Speedo goggles that work reasonably well--one of those "need goggles yesterday if not sooner" purchases, so no time to shop. Eventually, I'll try to find another pair of the Barracuda.

BabsVa
January 31st, 2007, 08:58 AM
Thanks for your replies, FMIF and waves101.

I also started masters out of curiosity and a need for variety and perhaps dare I mention ... a future T ...T ... T... no no I can't say the word but it is an athletic event that involves three phases, one after another ... generally for people about twenty years younger than I ...

Anyway, and yes my coach is terrifying me by suggesting I swim at a meet. It is nice to have goals! But I am still one foot in front of the other, trying to get across the pool and back and remain alive.

Pilates - love it. After three years, I am well acquainted with my obliques, rectus abdominus, etc. It is concentrated work that has helped my body awareness which is important since I am one of those super-flexible people who can easily hyperextend pretty much any joint and ultimately tend to injury if I am not very 'intentional' with how I move. Try it. A very enjoyable aspect is observing others in the class and seeing how their posture and movement improves (I say observe others since it is harder to notice these things about ourselves). In a lot of ways Pilates led me to swimming since they are both so concerned with core strength.

If you do decide to try Pilates, my suggestion is to find a very good, observant and thorough teacher - do not attempt it by watching a video until you are quite adept at all the poses.

And it does seem goggles are consumables like bathing suits - after a couple months in the chlorine, they are shot.

Thanks for telling me about your impressive athletic goals, they encourage me, and keep me posted on how it goes.

SwimStud
January 31st, 2007, 10:21 AM
I got a pair of AirGasket XD's from Speedo.

They work well. Just make sure you "burp" them in good before you dive. Otherwise they fill with water and you can't see.

I found they don't feel like they're hurting my eyes though. Also they seal well enough just resting on your eyes if you are only training and not diving etc.

Muppet
January 31st, 2007, 01:16 PM
My Crosstraining:

Lifting before swim practice m/w/thu (if i feel like it and/or have time).
Hockey Practice sunday; go skating at least once during the week.
Basketball tuesdays.
flag football spring and fall.
softball spring and summer.
occasional 15+ mi bikerides spring thru fall.
possible 1-3 triathlons each spring thru fall. usually just 1.

a little wacked out, but I am 26, pretty competitive and like to do random stuff just to have fun too. :banana:

I use sweedes, except for the Nike Socket Rockets I have from 1999 that I have for when the metallized sweedes act up for outdoor nationals'.

knelson
January 31st, 2007, 01:32 PM
I think the Speedo Vanquishers are the best goggles I've used. They don't leak, they're comfortable, and they last a long time. The silicone gasket won't pack out like goggles with foam do after a few months. Some people swear by Swedes. If they work well for you, go for it. I personally never liked them.

okoban
January 31st, 2007, 01:44 PM
Hi Babs,
If you are new to swimming, it is normal that you want a comfortable goggle. In fact there is not one, but you get used to it. The marks around your eyes will disappear within a couple of minutes, not a big deal. The models in Europe is different than the US, but I recommend you to try as much as possible (from your pool friends).
I like running, love swimming. You do not need to do any running to be fit in swimming. Just look at our idol's blogs (Ande the great). He just swims and do some weight lifting. You might also try parkour. If you can do it, you are fit enough to do any sports.

BabsVa
January 31st, 2007, 04:59 PM
Hey thanks everyone. Parkours!! Heh!

Actually, the sport for me would be Pentathlon - since I ride horses (except I would have to learn to shoot a rifle). :laugh2: Oh, and fencing. Heck, how hard can that be :laugh2:

CreamPuff
January 31st, 2007, 06:27 PM
Sorry. Have no help for you with the goggles. I'm a permanent raccoon.

For cross training I've done everything from
Jogging/ Running
Weight lifting
Pilates w/ flexibility routines built in
Core body exercises w/ stretch cords
Yoga
Biking
Triathlon
Roller Blading
Ice Skating
Water Skiing
Swimming - including open water swims

My fave combo for this year is swimming and weight lifting (stretch cords too) with flexibility training. Perfect! Weight lifting is better than running for me as lifting increases my metabolism so much that I'm thinner than when I run. And I'm more powerful in the water.

Who knows what next year will bring.

Best of luck to you!! Sounds like you do lots of stuff!!
Variety is the spice of life!

dorothyrde
January 31st, 2007, 07:21 PM
I have no set schedule, but basically I do 3-4 times a week swiming, up to 3 days of weight training, and I do step aerobics, kick boxing and cardio for other cardio. I usually fit 2 hours of exercise in a day for 5-6 days a week, doing it in a split, an hour at 5am, an hour after work.

I always, always, always take at least one rest day a week, sometimes two.

poolraat
January 31st, 2007, 07:31 PM
In addition to swimming 2500-3000 yards per day, 6 days per week, I run and lift.

....run to the fridge for snacks during commercial breaks, and on Friday's I hoist 12 oz weights at a nearby watering hole.:joker:

SwimStud
January 31st, 2007, 07:33 PM
In addition to swimming 2500-3000 yards per day, 6 days per week, I run and lift.

....run to the fridge for snacks during commercial breaks, and on Friday's I hoist 12 oz weights at a nearby watering hole.:joker:

Floyd I have found it better for my lower back if I lift while submerged in a warm therapy pool (See Avatar). Usually a Run and hurdle proceeds the lifting...except in winter when a x-country ski replaces the run.

jsmwbnc
January 31st, 2007, 07:35 PM
I find running to be a great addition to swimming. Don't do too much though because it will cause you to develop too much muscle in your legs and it will make it harder to keep them afloat.

poolraat
January 31st, 2007, 07:38 PM
Floyd I have found it better for my lower back if I lift while submerged in a warm therapy pool (See Avatar)

I was looking at your avatar earlier thinking you look pretty smug. But you need a Havana in the other hand to complete the look.

SwimStud
January 31st, 2007, 07:44 PM
I was looking at your avatar earlier thinking you look pretty smug. But you need a Havana in the other hand to complete the look.

I was totally knackered...and that was 5 hours later. I wasn't smug...stunned and happy yes. I wish you could have been there too...in a strictly "how bout them Bears?" platonic way...

Muppet
January 31st, 2007, 08:38 PM
I find running to be a great addition to swimming. Don't do too much though because it will cause you to develop too much muscle in your legs and it will make it harder to keep them afloat.

You may also develop quads large enough that will make cannibals eye your upper legs the same way I eyeball those giant theme-park turkey legs.

:banana:

CreamPuff
January 31st, 2007, 08:49 PM
You may also develop quads large enough that will make cannibals eye your upper legs the same way I eyeball those giant theme-park turkey legs.

:banana:

I believe those theme park turkey legs are called "Alien Legs" at Walt Disney World. Yummy!

born2fly
February 1st, 2007, 01:31 PM
Cross training, well I try to swim every day. Every other day I run 3 miles on the treadmill, and the other days I do not do the treadmill I lift and also do core work. Hmm, is work a form of cross training? I hack on computers all day so maybe that helps when I jam my fingers on the touchpad in the pool :-)

greg

jaegermeister
February 1st, 2007, 10:15 PM
Cross Training:
Try Pilates or Yoga. The hard thing about these two pursuits is that you need good instruction- I'd never rely on a DVD. If good instruction isn't available, other core strengthening like ball exercises, etc.

As far as aerobics, I think its whatever flips your switch. If you live in Minnesota, you can cross-country ski which is great aerobics and recruits the core. But nothing really specifically complements swimming. Variety is definitely the spice, though, so I wouldn't refrain from whatever you love to do.

The Fortress
February 1st, 2007, 10:45 PM
BabsVA:

You sound like should be doing aquathlons. I like those!

I am a former youth swimmer, turned nutty runner, turned injured runner, turned masters swimmer. But, having recovered from my running stress fractures, I still run. I am trying to stem that addiction somewhat and limit myself to 3 miles runs like Greg instead of 6 mile runs while focusing on swimming. (I don't think running does much for swimming. I just like it.) I lift weights too. No tris -- don't like bikes.

I'd do Pilates more, but mat pilates is kinda easy and those pilates machine classes cost the earth where I live. And there is only so much time ... That would probably be my cross-training of choice, if I could magic up more time.

Goggles:

The Vanquishers are good. The Speedo GCGs are comfy because they have foam and they work. Don't last forever though. Because I have goggle issues in the past, I only use speed sockets at practice and meets. (Keep your practice and meet goggles separate to avoid unexpected wear at a meet!) They don't leak, but I have major racoon eyes.

Hiro11
April 13th, 2007, 03:39 PM
As I'm new, thought I'd revive an old thread rather than starting one of my own.

I was a serious swimmer from the time I was 7 through high school. I burned out badly in college, dumped swimming and took up mountain biking and beer drinking. I'm now getting back into swimming after 15 years, marriage, 2 kids and baldness.

I run about 20 miles a week and swim maybe 8K yards a week. I alternate swimming and running workout six days a week.

I typically do 5 mile runs at 30-45 sec slower per mile than my 10K pace, one long run on the weekends. I've been mixing in a few track workouts lately as I'm trying to work on speed for 5/10Ks. I've found that swimming has helped me get faster in running as I have better anaerobic strength.

I only swim 2000-2500 when I swim, mostly intervals (500 warmup, 10X100 IM on 1:45 holding 1:18; 10X50 on :50 holding 35 with some kicking is typical). I remember back in highschool, 8-10K/workout was common for me, I can't even conceive of doing that these days...

I'm avoiding triathalons because I don't have time to add a third sport.

Also, Speedo Vanquishers are by far the best google I've ever used. They fit perfectly, are extremely comfortable, don't fall off and last forever. Where were they back when I was a kid? I remember fixing the nosepiece in my (uncomfortable) Swedes with dental floss..good times? Maybe but the goggles sucked.

swimr4life
April 13th, 2007, 06:02 PM
I think the Speedo Vanquishers are the best goggles I've used. They don't leak, they're comfortable, and they last a long time. The silicone gasket won't pack out like goggles with foam do after a few months. Some people swear by Swedes. If they work well for you, go for it. I personally never liked them.

YES! Speedo Vanquishers are my favorite. They never leak and don't make me look like a racoon!

ljodpundari
April 14th, 2007, 08:52 PM
I had to give up running because of arthritis in my knee. Right now I'm doing Taiji (t'ai chi), two group classes a week plus evenings at home. It's a good workout for the legs, and it seems to have improved my balance quite a bit. I feel like there's even some carryover to my swimming. I'll occasionally use a stationary bike at the Y, but that gets boring really fast.:yawn:

I've been using Aquasphere Kaiman goggles for about two years now, and am very happy with them. I suppose something with smaller lenses would be better for competition, but I really enjoy the good field of view. I have a bit of a problem with leaks about every 3rd practice, but less than with anything else I've tried. The goggles run large, but there's a small adult/youth version available. I got mine from www.kiefer.com (http://www.kiefer.com).

Tom

bud
April 16th, 2007, 12:39 PM
....and yes my coach is terrifying me by suggesting I swim at a meet. It is nice to have goals! But I am still one foot in front of the other, trying to get across the pool and back and remain alive....

Do the meet. Your teammates will love you to death and no one at the meet (worth their salt) will care if you are a “super swimmer” or not. If anything you will get a lot more respect than the other swimmers because everyone there knows it takes a lot more guts to go to a meet the first time around. For every person that shows up not bursting with confidence, there are a lot more people who don’t even bother to try. It takes guts, and the people who matter most know it.

Once you go I think you will love it, I know I do and I almost never beat anybody. But those times that I do are oh so sweet! If you have a competitive edge to your personality swimming is a great way to get your ya-ya’s out ‘cause you are mostly competing against yourself (especially in heats for masters, which are typically grouped by time and not age).

It is never too early to start collecting times, and you may only get one opportunity per year per course (SCY, LCM, SCM) to accumulate official times, so you may as well start now. Starting to collect times early will also give you a better point of reference for your improvement. I eventually got to the point where I selected events by which ones were the least popular, that way I’d score more points (which is one of the reasons your team will love you for showing up and racing). This strategy also gave me a lot of inspiration to learn butterfly, which I'm now very grateful for.


I get my goggles from Kiefer too http://www.kiefer.com/ The products and quality are consistent, and I always know where to find them. I like all the Kiefer brand products I’ve tried and get the goggles with silicon gaskets that have good peripheral vision (for backstroke). Their prescription goggles are very reasonably priced and are nearly identical in style to my regular goggles, so it is pretty easy to switch between the two. I find a good fitting pair of goggles with silicon gaskets are the least offensive for leaving marks around my eyes. “Good fitting” is the key here... if they are too tight they are going to leave a mark no matter what. I bought a pair of barracudas once, I thought they sucked, what a total waste of money (but that’s just me).

- - -

As for guts, listen to this: I was in the middle of a meet checking out the (so far) posted results when I overheard a woman behind me telling someone she’d learned to swim less than two years earlier. (Huh!?) It was kind of crowed and boisterous on that part of the deck and I didn’t trust my hearing, so when she’d finished her conversation I chatted her up a bit (she was really cute too, which didn’t hurt either). Turns out she really had never learned to swim (she was about 30). Her adolescent daughter was learning to swim, so she figured it was about time that she do the same. She was an athlete, was into body sculpting, but blew out her knee and her doctor told her all she could do safely now was swim (so that was additional motivation to learn).

I watched her swim at meets for about two years (I’ve since moved from that region). She was by no means the fastest fish in the pond, but she kept showing up and doing it. I thought she had a lot of raw nerve. She got LOTS of support from her team too (which was usually the biggest team at meets). They would cheer her on during her swims to a level that you generally had to suspend conversation. It seemed like a win-win situation all the way around to me.

BabsVa
April 16th, 2007, 01:20 PM
Bubba - thanks for your nice reply. I did demure on the meet. I really did not feel ready - though a part of me thought: hmmm, this fellow has been coaching swimming for 52 years (yes, you read right) so if he thinks I'm ready, what do I know? But really, it has taken me quite a while to be comfortable and not tense in the pool. I learned to swim in open water - ponds, lakes, Long Island Sound. The whole process of getting accustomed to swimming in a pool looking down at the black line involved getting past a lingering claustrophobic feeling.

Feel pretty good about my accomplishments so far: actual flip turns with some regularity, will swim a 100 without stopping, and today swam a mile :-) And like the lady you described, I got into this in part because my swim team kids are a good influence on Mom.