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LindsayNB
February 2nd, 2007, 01:40 PM
I am wondering if anyone has noticed a correlation between type of workout and what kind of mood they are in afterward. Sometimes when we get over-the-top kick sets I end up feeling totally drained, and not in a good way. Often when we do a sprint oriented workout I feel really pumped afterward, even if I got nauseous while swimming. After a long slow distance workout I'll be totally exhausted, but in a good way. Sometimes I'm so tired I can barely lift my arms to shampoo my hair but I feel great, last night I just wanted to be put out of my misery.

Do you find that certain types of workouts put you in certain types of moods?

poolraat
February 2nd, 2007, 01:47 PM
Do you find that certain types of workouts put you in certain types of moods?

I do. And sometimes the mood I'm in beforehand, dictates how the workout will be. If I go to the pool feeling down, as the workout progresses I will sometimes come out of it and have an awesome swim and at times the opposite will occur and I'll struggle just to get through it.

scyfreestyler
February 2nd, 2007, 01:55 PM
Any workout that makes me hurt puts me in a good mood afterwards. I suspect knowing that I have accomplished something makes me feel good. As far as mood prior to swimming, I am rarely in a foul mood so I am generally eager to jump in the water and count some tiles.

tjburk
February 2nd, 2007, 01:57 PM
Mood going in can definitely influence your workout!!!! I look forward to practice now....so I usually enjoy everyone of them! And for me, any workout puts me in a good mood.....the harder the better most of the time!!!!

CreamPuff
February 2nd, 2007, 01:59 PM
Very interesting question Lindsay.

I find that it's not the type of workout but how I do in the workout that sets my mood. So, I've felt everything from awesome to sluggish and dead post sprint, middle distance, IM, and distance workouts. If I bomb or don't live up to what I wanted to do, I can feel down and/ or dead. If I exceed my expectations and do great, although tired, I can feel pumped.

As a masters, I'm trying to not let the type of set dictate my mood which would then set me up for success or failure. So, as a kid, I'd hear 6x200 back and go "ACKKKKKKKKKK" even before pushing off the wall for the first 200. Usually, I'd then bomb the set with that bad attitude going in. And, I'd feel bad and tired at the end of the set.

Now, I try and push any negative thoughts aside (realize that everyone has to do the set) and just take the set one repeat at a time and set small goals for that set.

Now, anyone have a formula for "pushing past the pain?" I find I can do this more than when I was a kid - but I'm still inconsistent with being able to do this. (You know, push through the pain and then you feel okay. . .)

SwimStud
February 2nd, 2007, 02:02 PM
Sickness excepted. I force myself to go even if feeling tired. The drive over I pump something boucny through the stereo, and sing along (yes Heather, yet another talent). When I get there I can feel tired but I shower and turn it cold before hitting the pool. After a warm-up I ususally no longer feel tired or weary and can get to work.

A hot-chocolate with a shot of creme de menthe in it when I get home is a good reward if it's cold out.

CreamPuff
February 2nd, 2007, 02:02 PM
I look forward to practice now....so I usually enjoy everyone of them! And for me, any workout puts me in a good mood.....the harder the better most of the time!!!!

Right on! It was a nice surpise to go from dreading workouts in AG to looking forward to them as masters.

born2fly
February 2nd, 2007, 02:11 PM
I think I swim better at practice when Im having a bad day or bad attitude. The practice helps take the stress out of me. I can remember long time ago when I was a junior in high school. To that point my best 200fly time was a 2:02. My girlfriend and I got into a huge fight right before practice. I got to practice, went right up to my coach and said I want to do a 200fly for time. I did no warm up, strickly adrenaline and went a 1:59.

Wish I could get that attitude back as a master. I think am to laid back before the race. Overall though for me bad days at work or home mean good practices in the pool.

greg

scyfreestyler
February 2nd, 2007, 02:11 PM
Now, anyone have a formula for "pushing past the pain?" I find I can do this more than when I was a kid - but I'm still inconsistent with being able to do this. (You know, push through the pain and then you feel okay. . .)

Depending upon the pain level, I'll resort to swimming some 50's and 100's with some rest to regenerate my ATP supplies when things get ugly. If its minor discomfort I'll just push on through but sometimes you have to know when to say when. When my arms are ready to fall off and my heart rate is through the roof, pushing on is probably not in my best interest.

SwimStud
February 2nd, 2007, 02:13 PM
Depending upon the pain level, I'll resort to swimming some 50's and 100's with some rest to regenerate my ATP supplies when things get ugly. If its minor discomfort I'll just push on through but sometimes you have to know when to say when. When my arms are ready to fall off and my heart rate is through the roof, pushing on is probably not in my best interest.

I push on through pretty much anything but cramps...I hate cramps.
then again I'm training solo...maybe a coach would make me cry...

scyfreestyler
February 2nd, 2007, 02:16 PM
I was doing some 50 sprints with minimal rest the other night and after 8 of them I just could not make it happen anymore. I was spent. Perhaps if somebody has the proverbial gun to my head I could have done it but short of that...it's time to enjoy the company of the gutter.

LindsayNB
February 2nd, 2007, 02:43 PM
Come to think of it, maybe it wasn't the kick sets as much as the way I was totally useless on the following set even though I was trying very hard. Maybe I was trying too hard. The coach asked us to do 100s on 2min at best time + 10s and I could barely manage best time + 20s. Grrr. And then he told us to do 200 kick for warmdown... I know my kick needs work but that was just cruel.

okoban
February 2nd, 2007, 04:06 PM
Morning sprint sets are stressfull. Sometimes my stress begins at night time and I can not sleep enough (Did I say I'm in love with swimming before?). If I can do my sets within target, I'm happy, if not, a bit upset but motivated.
I like drill sets more especially in the week-ends. I have more time, I enjoy my swim.
When my right shoulder is silent in the stretching part, I am very happy, but it clicks most of the time.
When there is a fast swimmer in the next lane, I am faster, if the swimmer is female I am much faster (I don't know why) :woot: .
I hate kick sets anyway.

chaos
February 2nd, 2007, 04:42 PM
when i miss a workout....i'm miserable

poolraat
February 2nd, 2007, 04:46 PM
when i miss a workout....i'm miserable

I know what you mean. My pool is closed today (and probably tomorrow) for repairs. I hate it when they mess with my training plan!!:mad:

The Fortress
February 2nd, 2007, 06:26 PM
when i miss a workout....i'm miserable

When I miss a workout or exercise ... I'm an ogre.

Engine-building workout: exhausted, possible shoulder pain, possible boredom if it's mostly free, but possible endorphine high too

"Serial" workout with lots of stroke changes and interesting sets/drills/kicking in 50, 75s, 100s and 150s: great! tired too.

Sprint workouts: great! tired too.

Early morning workouts: forget it, death

I don't like cramps either SwimStud. And because I'm always overusing my leg muscles with running and kicking, I get them. Ouch.

Unlike that stud, Kristina, I could push through pain better as a kid. Now, like Matt, I worry a bit about the arms falling off.

SolarEnergy
February 2nd, 2007, 07:06 PM
Do you find that certain types of workouts put you in certain types of moods? Absolutely.

Low level LSD swims, stopping before exhaustion, have a boosting effect on my humor. I love every one, only see the right side of things, and feel invincible.

For different reasons, swims in bad pools where ropes weren't tightened enough, with 10 swimmers per lane, makes me feel as if I wanted to drown five of them, or seriously injure the lazy lifeguard that didn't tighten the ropes enough.

swim4me
February 2nd, 2007, 07:09 PM
I am always in a good mood after swimming :D , even if I struggled through practice:frustrated: . I swim at 5:30 am, and there are mornings when it is really hard to dive in, but I ALWAYS feel good when it is done :agree: , even if my shoulders or legs are sore. Swim workouts are the BEST way to start the workday :agree: . I drive to work afterward with wet hair (there is a gym at work and I finish drying it there) and an overall good feeling. Since I began Masters in October, I have always been in a good mood after practice :) .

ensignada
February 2nd, 2007, 07:14 PM
This past week I've been exhausted: all tax, all the time. A couple of evenings I easily could have gone to bed early, but I went to the pool instead because I have yet to leave the pool feeling anything but good about myself. As I swam, I forgot about the rest of the world. When I came home, I was worn out but in a good way...not an "I've had enough of today" way.

Allen Stark
February 2nd, 2007, 08:17 PM
I almost always feel better after workouts(though this kicking only stuff is getting old.) Like Fort I am absolute Ogre when I don't swim.Sometimes my wife says"don't you need to go workout".

jim thornton
February 3rd, 2007, 06:44 PM
At the risk of boring y'all, I did an article on antidepressants--especially the new SNRIs (serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors) a couple years back, and the sidebar for the main feature was on so-called hippocampal neurogenesis--i.e., the idea that new neurons can be stimulated to regrow in a key part of the brain called the hippocampus (greek for seahorse, which this structure allegedly resembles.)

These drugs can trigger this regrowth, but exercise also does a fine job. This excerpt is a wee bit dated, but those of you interested in brain physiology might find it interesting to consider the next time you're swimming laps that your efforts are conceivably beefing up your brain simultaneously, offering at least some inoculation to depression:

---------------------------------------
...it now appears that by effectively boosting either of these two key neurotransmitters, antidepressants can stimulate neurogenesis, which, in turn, results in a reduction in anxious behavior. Already, other researchers are planning to study drugs like Cymbalta and Effexor that effect both serotonin and norepinephrine to see if the double-whammy approach indeed works even better.
Though Duman [Dr. Ronald S. Duman, a professor of psychiatry and pharmacology at Yale University] says it's still too early to say for sure that the mystery about antidepressant lag time has been definitively solved, the "neurogenesis hypothesis" is generating tremendous excitement--and hope for novel interventions--among researchers. Hen [Rene Hen, Ph.D., leader of a research team at Columbia University] , for his part, has reportedly started a company to look for new drugs that specifically promote neurogenesis. The hope, at least, is that by bypassing a more systemic approach, side effects like impaired sexual performance might become a thing of the past.
"We used to consider the brain as a hard wire computer kind of deal, but it's really a very adaptive and plastic organ," says Duman. "Even in someone who has been severely stressed, hippocampal atrophy might prove reversible with the correct treatment."
SNRI drugs like Cymbalta, for instance, which promote neurogenesis through both the serotonin and norepinephrine systems, may prove especially effective. But it turns out a simple drug-free technique can do an excellent job, as well: exercise. "Give a mouse a running wheel, and they will run for 8 or 10 miles a night," says Duman. "Over a course of a few weeks, they'll also enjoy a doubling in the rates of neurogenesis."
In coming years, researchers will surely gain ever more sophisticated insights into the causes--and remedies--for mood disorders. Until then, a depressed guy's best option seems clear: take medicine if you need it but don't forget to head to the gym. It's the best way to build a healthy body and a healthy brain.

Allen Stark
February 3rd, 2007, 07:34 PM
As I tell my patients "exercise is the best natural anti-depressant."

Peter Cruise
February 3rd, 2007, 08:13 PM
Allen- also, to turn your phrase around, depression is a potent anti-exercise force. Self sabotage.

ensignada
February 3rd, 2007, 08:14 PM
As I tell my patients "exercise is the best natural anti-depressant."

Years ago in grad school, a friend of mine was dangerously depressed and hospitalized. When she was released, her psychiatrist told her that depression hated fresh air and exercise.

~Wren~
February 3rd, 2007, 09:09 PM
Sickness excepted. I force myself to go even if feeling tired. The drive over I pump something boucny through the stereo, and sing along (yes Heather, yet another talent). When I get there I can feel tired but I shower and turn it cold before hitting the pool. After a warm-up I ususally no longer feel tired or weary and can get to work.

A hot-chocolate with a shot of creme de menthe in it when I get home is a good reward if it's cold out.

Skip the cold shower, and swap the hot chocolate out for a non-fat sugar-free hazelnut latte (sometimes with an extra shot of espresso) and this pretty much sums it up for me too. Whoever thought to put a Caribou coffee in my health club was BRILLIANT!! :applaud: