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Seagurl51
February 7th, 2007, 01:39 PM
I've been working on stretching out my stroke because I know that eventually that will make we faster than taking little strokes. When I keep my strokes long I don't get as strong a finish as I do when I keep my strokes a little shorter. My hands slip and and the push it basically wasted. Any ideas of how to combat this? I have been going to the gym and I have noticed that I'm getting stronger, so I was thinking maybe there was some other reason for the slippage.

Thanks in advance!

knelson
February 7th, 2007, 01:53 PM
Do you ever swim with paddles? I think they really help you lengthen your stroke, especially at the finish. I know some people don't use them, but I do and think they help my stroke. When you take the paddles off your stroke won't feel as long but at least you know what it's supposed to feel like.

islandsox
February 7th, 2007, 01:57 PM
Kyra,

Question: how do you know that you do not get as good a finish with a long stroke vs your shorter stroke? Is it just because you can't feel the finish as intensely as with the shorter stroke? One thing I know is when a swimmer has a longer stroke overall, that during the pull phase, a lot of water is grabbed and then the arm hangs onto that water up until the finish portion. Because a great amount of water is grabbed, pulled and pushed, a swimmer can travel farther with each stroke. And don't forget that when a stroke is longer, it is slower in duration thus making a swimmer feel like they are not working as hard when, in fact, they are working differently hard. It takes great upper body strength to grab and complete the stroke because of the longer arm rotation.

One thing I work on is my triceps; often. Those are the muscles that help me finish my stroke without weakness.

Keep us informed.

Donna

Seagurl51
February 7th, 2007, 02:03 PM
Donna:

When I have shorter strokes my overall pull feels stronger, like I'm pulling more water. My times stay about the same though, so maybe I'm just not noticing like you said.


Kirk: I occasionally use paddles, but not regularly.

Thanks both for the tips.

fanstone
February 7th, 2007, 02:50 PM
Let me complement the question. When swimming fast it seems that turnover (more strokes, I think I am using a running word) is faster. The stretch is less and the pushing off at the end of the stroke is almost nil. Basically, I pull water from slightly in front of my head after entry (always front quadrant and early vertical) to my waist. If I am training or swimming longer than 50 meters I will stretch and push at the end of the stroke all the way to my mid thigh. Here is the question: is it worthwhile to do the complete stroke when swimming fast short distances or is it better to just do whatever "seems" faster. I know the answer: do both ways and time them. But yet, some input might be good. Thanks, billy fanstone:lolup: :lolup: :lolup:

okoban
February 8th, 2007, 03:18 PM
Here is the question: is it worthwhile to do the complete stroke when swimming fast short distances or is it better to just do whatever "seems" faster. I know the answer: do both ways and time them. But yet, some input might be good. Thanks, billy fanstone:lolup: :lolup: :lolup:[/quote]
Hi amigo,
When I start pushing hard at the start of my stroke, I hurt my shoulders (clicking). I am still working on my strokes, but learned that stretching out long, starting the pull easy, accelerating through the end and finishing past the hips is what most of the good swimmers do. Just have a look at the films in http://www.nyhoff.net/swimcity/
Ande stresses that taking the full stroke, but making it faster (doing 15s, 25s and 50s) is important.
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