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xav8r
December 16th, 2002, 06:10 PM
I didn't learn to swim until recently (around 3 years ago). A couple of months after learning to dog paddle, I went to a local pool (like a Y) and started walking toward deeper water and swimming back. After a week or two I managed a whole lap, and things went better from there.
Now here I am, at the start of another winter, and while I can do some OK yardage, I am awfully slow (1/4 mile in 14, 1/2 in 29, and 3/4 in around 44). My fastest hundred yards (remember, I am pacing myself) is usually just over 2 minutes and happens at around 1/8 and again at 3/8 miles. (I confessed this to a guy at work who then called me an anchor. Gee thanks :-)
There is a local masters club (it's hard to get in touch with my best contact, though), and I might consider joining it, but...
I don't have any real interest in competing, and would be more interested in improving technique.
My question (finally), are master's clubs all about racing, or are there people that participate for the accountability and skill improvement?

Thanks,

Howard

NYCButterfly
December 16th, 2002, 07:02 PM
Hi Howard, Wow, what a great inspiration! I'm not sure about your question, but from what I hear is that it's both, swimmers who want to compete and swimmers who love to swim. Keep going!

KenChertoff
December 16th, 2002, 09:54 PM
Originally posted by xav8r


My question (finally), are master's clubs all about racing, or are there people that participate for the accountability and skill improvement?



Most masters swimmers rarely or never compete and many, if not most, clubs focus on fitness and technique rather than racing. That said, it really depends on the club. Some clubs (like mine) do emphasize competition.

So it's important that you know about the club's philosophy before you join. But you really shouldn't be afraid of competing. Masters meets, in general, are low key (except perhaps for Nationals and Zones) and how you perform or where you place isn't an issue. Masters, as a rule, are supportive of newbies and competing can be the best way to improve.

zoomzoomdave
January 2nd, 2003, 10:33 PM
if you do find a club that rarely competes and you decide to change your mind later, you could always talk to your coach. I'm sure they'll find a good meet to put you in.

Competing is fun fun fun! ;)

HeatherLouy
January 2nd, 2003, 11:15 PM
The beauty of USMS is that as long as you can get to the other end of the pool in some sort of swimming fashion, there is a club or team out there for you. As Ken said most masters do not compete and that is something to ask when considering a team. Postals are a great way to get into the competition for those who are shy or completely new.
I hope you find a club/team for you!!

Good luck!