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View Full Version : To shave or to wax: what's the best method of hair removal?



Syd
July 17th, 2007, 03:04 AM
So what is the best method of hair removal? Waxing, shaving or one of those depilatory creams? What are the pros and cons? Which method is the longest lasting and which is the easiest?

Syd

knelson
July 17th, 2007, 11:34 AM
Everyone will tell you shaving is the best because it also removes the top, dead layer of skin resulting in a smoother surface. Whether this is based on empirical evidence or purely speculation I can't say for sure.

laineybug
July 17th, 2007, 06:16 PM
don't forget threading!

Shaving pro-smooth and dead skin cells gone (maybe) con-you will have stubble every where you shave

Waxing and threading pro-jerks it out by the root, very smooth, may also remove dead skin cells con-OCHIE! If you wax often enough you may see a decrease in hair growth. That can be a pro or a con.

creams pro-smooth easy to do cons--some folks are alergic, not necessarily recommended for more personal areas, under arms etc

knelson
July 17th, 2007, 06:38 PM
Threading? What's that?

3strokes
July 17th, 2007, 09:32 PM
Threading? What's that?

I have seen that done by some Egyptian barbers.

They will twist a very thin thread between the fingers of their two hands.
I can't remember how many twists. And then when they run this twisted thread over certain parts of your skin (I've seen it only on faces -beards and mustaches-) the twisting thread will entrap and PULL OUT hairs. I never heard the victims scream. (Were they real machos? Was it because there was an audience -apart from the barber? Or did it really not hurt?) I never asked.

Midas
July 17th, 2007, 10:39 PM
I haven't shaved in over a decade, but I always thought part of the benefit to shaving was the additional sensitivity you got from doing it. And I always thought that the additional sensitivity came from shaving off those top layers of skin and exposing your nerve endings a little more. Even just wearing clothes I remember how much more sensitive it felt. Am I hopelessly out of date in that theory? Does waxing (or Nair or whatever) give you the same heightened sensitivity?

geochuck
July 18th, 2007, 12:17 AM
Before I had wiskers I was told to put milk on my face and let the cat lick the milk and I would never have to shave.

Syd
July 18th, 2007, 01:17 AM
Before I had wiskers I was told to put milk on my face and let the cat lick the milk and I would never have to shave.
:D

I have done a little research on the net and it seems the biggest difference between shaving and waxing is the time it takes for the hair to grow back. (That apart from the pain aspect)! Shaving lasts only a couple of days and the stubble starts growing out again, whereas waxing lasts for 3 to 6 weeks. Waxing has another advantage over shaving in that when the hair grows back, it is sparser than before. Shaving, on the other hand, encourages coarser hair regrowth.

How bad is the pain? I have an average to below average amount of bodily hair. Would waxing be the way to go then? Threading sounds like it would be best suited to facial hair, or perhaps I am wrong. I just worry if I shave I will look like a mountain gorilla when it grows back again, or are my fears unfounded? I don't like the idea of the pain of waxing though. I saw that movie "40 year old virgin" and what they did to that guy's chest gave me second thoughts about waxing. It looked really painful. I don't mind a little pain ( a lot, even, as long as it is short lived) but I don't want torn nipples or scarring!

So what do method do you use?

Syd

knelson
July 18th, 2007, 12:35 PM
I just worry if I shave I will look like a mountain gorilla when it grows back again, or are my fears unfounded?

Yes, the idea that hair grows back thicker after shaving is a myth.

smontanaro
July 18th, 2007, 12:47 PM
Yes, the idea that hair grows back thicker after shaving is a myth.

It if wasn't a myth I wouldn't be headed (so-to-speak) toward cue ball status...

Skip

Syd
July 19th, 2007, 09:20 AM
Yes, the idea that hair grows back thicker after shaving is a myth.

Thanks for dispelling that one...actually upon further investigation I found that the first study to disprove that was as early as 1928! Guess I am a bit behind the times there. :blush:

So what method do you use then? I have only ever shaved once before and that was 24 years ago when I last competed. I only shaved my legs as I didn't have anything on my chest yet!:sad:I remember it feeling amazingly smooth and my long school, cotton slacks clung to my legs (as did my sheets when I got into bed that night).

Syd

knelson
July 19th, 2007, 11:23 AM
So what method do you use then?

I always start by using clippers to remove the bulk of the hair, then just use a disposable razor and shaving cream to get what's left.

Midas
July 19th, 2007, 01:52 PM
I always start by using clippers to remove the bulk of the hair, then just use a disposable razor and shaving cream to get what's left.

Sage advice. I remember NOT doing that as a kid (well, teenager) and nicking the heck out of my legs (the long hairs gunk up the razor, or dull it, or something--I don't know).

inklaire
July 21st, 2007, 01:45 AM
I use an epilator, once or twice a week. It slows down regrowth, like waxing, but doesn't remove or blister skin. I'd heard bad things about these devices, but I'm truly glad I tried one. Shaving every day was tedious. I don't think I could recommend this method for men. You have to enjoy or at least tolerate the experience of hair being ripped out by the roots to use one effectively.

If I were preparing for a meet, I'd definitely shave, for the sensation of truly "bare" skin. The only advice I have is not to use men's razors for body hair. There is a noticeable difference in design, and the sharper man's razor would require a very practiced and steady hand, I'd think, to avoid cuts.

A very hairy man should definitely clip the hair first, as was already suggested, before using any other method.

Syd
July 21st, 2007, 08:47 AM
The only advice I have is not to use men's razors for body hair. There is a noticeable difference in design, and the sharper man's razor would require a very practiced and steady hand, I'd think, to avoid cuts.

A very hairy man should definitely clip the hair first, as was already suggested, before using any other method.

Thanks for that advice. I wouldn't have thought about using a womens' razor. Any particular brand name that you would reccommend?

Syd

knelson
July 21st, 2007, 01:45 PM
The main difference between men's and women's disposable razors is the women's are pink. Seriously.

inklaire
July 22nd, 2007, 01:23 AM
The main difference between men's and women's disposable razors is the women's are pink. Seriously.

True for the very worst and cheapest. My razor, when I use it, is neither disposable nor pink. I'd definitely stay a mile away from the bags of pink ones. If the head doesn't pivot, it's going to hurt somewhere, in my experience. At any rate, I prefer Venus, in any incarnation. They are even available in blue. ;)

geochuck
July 22nd, 2007, 08:05 AM
I hate to shave my whiskers and have never shaved my body.

I prefer the barber to get out his trusty straight edge razor to do the job. I just made sure that he was gentle and did not take an ear. It used to cost a buck but now its a 20.

So now I get out the gillette disposable and shave the whiskers once a week. They used to be cheap but now cost about a buck. I often think Luigi the barber was the better buy for the price.

laineybug
July 23rd, 2007, 05:10 PM
Threading? What's that?

you take a length of thread, tie the ends together in a knot
slip the loop of thread over one hand, and then twist it several times.
slip the other hand in the other end of the loop (so you have the twists in the middle)
now, by openning one hand and closing the other simultaneously you can move the twists back and forth between your hands.
run the twisted loop of thread up and down on legs, arms, etc while openning and closing the hands.
as you do this the hair gets caught in the twists and out it comes.


OWIE!

quicksilver
July 23rd, 2007, 05:23 PM
you take a length of thread, tie the ends together in a knot
slip the loop of thread over one hand, and then twist it several times.
slip the other hand in the other end of the loop (so you have the twists in the middle)
now, by openning one hand and closing the other simultaneously you can move the twists back and forth between your hands.
run the twisted loop of thread up and down on legs, arms, etc while openning and closing the hands.
as you do this the hair gets caught in the twists and out it comes.


OWIE!

And after that...you apply leaches to suck all the tired blood out your extremities.

New red blood cells will form over the next fortnight assuring optimal performance for the next jousting match.

mermaid
July 23rd, 2007, 09:35 PM
I've tried: Laser, wax, shaving & "nair".

Laser = most effective, most expensive, longest lasting, & not as painful as you expect.

Wax = effective, cost (varies), lasts almost 7 weeks & not so painful.

Shaving = effective for a meet / event that day, in-expensive, doesn't last & is painful even when you nick yourself. Did I metion the ingrowns??!!

"Nair" = somewhat effective (depends if you leave it on long enough but not too long), cost (depends on product), lasts (varies on product), pain - if your allergic . . . & there is still the issue of in-growns . . .

Syd
July 24th, 2007, 02:57 AM
I've tried: Laser, wax, shaving & "nair".

Laser = most effective, most expensive, longest lasting, & not as painful as you expect.

Wax = effective, cost (varies), lasts almost 7 weeks & not so painful.

Shaving = effective for a meet / event that day, in-expensive, doesn't last & is painful even when you nick yourself. Did I metion the ingrowns??!!

"Nair" = somewhat effective (depends if you leave it on long enough but not too long), cost (depends on product), lasts (varies on product), pain - if your allergic . . . & there is still the issue of in-growns . . .

Yes, ingrown hairs are worrisome as are the possibility of nicks and cuts. I should imagine waxing for a man, given that mens' bodily hair is, generally coarser, longer and more abundant, is more painful than for a woman. Also men have the additional areas of chest and abdomen to wax and the abdomen in particular is a very sensitive. Any men who have waxed care to share experiences on this?

Syd

mermaid
July 24th, 2007, 01:39 PM
True - but there are plenty of men who do wax - I know them. For best results you need to keep regular with your appoinments so you can keep your "woolly" self at bay.

ande
July 24th, 2007, 05:31 PM
depends what hair you want to remove and why
Don't use an Epilady they hurt

If you want to remove hair so you'll swim faster, shave
Allow your hair to grow back faster and create drag in the next season.

Wax if you feel you need to trim the hedges.

If your partner doesn't like the new prickly you when your recently shaved regions are growing back. Apply NAIR to those areas, let it linger for a while, and it will round off the sharp edges of the hair fibers making them softer sooner.

I tend to shave what isn't covered by my hineck fastskin

hope this helps,

ande



So what is the best method of hair removal?
Waxing, shaving or one of those depilatory creams? What are the pros and cons? Which method is the longest lasting and which is the easiest?

Syd

geochuck
July 24th, 2007, 06:37 PM
I was told that when you shave with a razor you remove the hair and a little layer of skin. This is what some say makes you more sensitive to feel.

jswim
July 26th, 2007, 04:10 PM
I bought an epilator a while back, and LOVED it at first, it seemed great, but found that if I don't exfoliate regularly, that ingrown hairs can be a problem with this method as well.

Shaving (at least for a girl), is a total pain to have to do on a regular basis, but I imagine as some others have mentioned that it might be fine for a one day meet or so.

As far as the shaving myth of regrowing thicker hair, I read somewhere that it is in fact a myth, but that it sometimes seems thicker to people because when you shave you're cutting the hair at it's base where it's the thickest, therefore appearing to grow back thicker. As opposed to waxing, epillating, or using creams, where the hair starts anew with a finer tip initially breaking through the surface of the skin.

Anyway I just thought that was interesting and made sense. ;)

Scottly
July 26th, 2007, 04:25 PM
[quote=mermaid;100786]I've tried: Laser, wax, shaving & "nair".

Laser = most effective, most expensive, longest lasting, & not as painful as you expect.


I thought laser was permanent.? Does hair grow back after a laser treatment?