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seagrapesmoothei
July 17th, 2007, 10:52 AM
hey my name's anika. i've pretty much grown up in the ocean and had a pool my whole life, but i've never swam for sport or exercise. my pool is 30 ft long and 8 ft deep.. how much do i need to swim to get a very good workout? help please! :bow:

aquageek
July 17th, 2007, 10:58 AM
hey my name's anika. i've pretty much grown up in the ocean and had a pool my whole life, but i've never swam for sport or exercise. my pool is 30 ft long and 8 ft deep.. how much do i need to swim to get a very good workout? help please! :bow:

It's going to be awfully hard to do any meaningful swimming in a 10 yard pool. If that's all you have, maybe some sort of tether/bungee system so you don't get loopy from flip turns every 12 seconds. Vertical kicking would be good in 8 feet of water.

gull
July 17th, 2007, 11:15 AM
Endless Pools has a product called the Fastlane that apparently can be used in a pool your size, allowing you to swim against a current:


http://www.endlesspools.com/fastlane/whatis/index.html

bud
July 18th, 2007, 01:36 PM
... how much do i need to swim to get a very good workout? help please!

most folks would agree that you need to get your heart rate up for 20min to get a good workout (in anything).

you don't need to swim non stop. in fact it is better if you take breaks during your workout, especially in the beginning. listen to your body, it will tell you what to do.

i suggest picking a time, like 45min, and swim as much as you can in that time (even if you only swim half that time you will still get a pretty decent workout). the more you practice, the more distance per time you will do (and the shorter your rests will get). you can add more time as you get more proficient. most masters workouts are 60min.

i have to agree that either a tether or a current generating device is the only way to go in a 10yd/30ft pool.

you can view some tether devices at:
http://www.kiefer.com/
swim belts page (http://www.kiefer.com/Kiefer/dept.asp?0=dept%2Easp%2Cdept%5Fid%3D88%26Tree%3D%2 CCompetitive%20Swim&1=dept%2Easp%2Cdept%5Fid%3D5%26Tree%3D0%2CTraining&dept_id=52&Gift=false&GiftID=&mscssid=14333526132044FFACB2287F948BA7C3)

they generally come with one or two cord attachment points. a 4ft bungee should be enough, you can always use a piece of rope to make it longer if needed.

i'm strongly considering getting the lane trainer belt (two attachment points) for use at my condo/apt pool. i figure it will be the most versatile. i'm guessing the single cord belt will rub against me when i kick, or i can just use one cord on the dual cord belt.

(anyone ever do the tug-o-war belt thing? looks like it could be fun.)


for more exercise info try these links/sites:

the USMS web has a number of swimming related articles:
http://www.usms.org/articles/articledisplay.php

this site also has a lot of general info:
http://exercise.about.com/

you can also try:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exercise



this page is about over-exercising
http://www.mckinley.uiuc.edu/Handouts/exercise_how_much.html
, but it lists this statement:

The American College of Sports Medicine has issued the following guidelines for physical activity:

AEROBIC

Frequency - 3-5 days per week
Intensity - 50-85% estimated maximum heart rate, or exercise perceived to be "somewhat hard" or "hard"
Duration - 20-60 minutes of continuous exercise

RESISTANCE

Frequency - 2-3 days per week
Intensity/Duration - 1-3 sets of 8-12 repetitions; 10-12 total exercises, one for each major muscle group (chest, back, shoulders, biceps, triceps, quadriceps, hamstrings, gluteals, calves and core - abs and low back)

geochuck
July 19th, 2007, 08:30 AM
Endless Pools has a product called the Fastlane that apparently can be used in a pool your size, allowing you to swim against a current:


http://www.endlesspools.com/fastlane/whatis/index.html That unit sells for about $7,000. A swim tether sells for $25.

There are many swim machines available from $3,000 to $7,900, I prefer the $7,900 one, it has the most current flow for the dollar.

gufyduck
July 19th, 2007, 12:34 PM
I'm gonna go against what everyone else is saying. I would say try it out. I have no clue what type of swimmer you are, or how strong of a swimmer you are. Swim back and forth for 10 minutes, can you get your heart rate up? Or are you spending half your time just gliding from pushing off the walls? If you are spending half your time pushing off the walls, time to go to a public pool for workouts or get a swimming tether/machine. If you can get your heart up, and feel you are getting a good workout, enjoy your pool.