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swim4sanity
July 20th, 2007, 09:41 AM
I am looking for a Swimmer who is also an OB/GYN or vice versa. Anyone swim with one? I will travel anywhere in the country to find the right doctor. I need an OB/GYN who understands Swimmers and their needs.

fanstone
July 20th, 2007, 11:18 AM
I am an OB/GYN anesthesiologist and I live in Brazil, so would be of little help to you. But I can see your point. I myself usually consult with sports oriented doctors, preferably runners (not that many orthopod swimmers around here) or athletes of other sports. My swimming masters group has one infectiologist, one paediatrician, one surgeon, and one radiologist. You can see that those who are in health endeavours like to swim. Interestingly, I meet lots of medical doctors at the state level meets, some of them former elite kid or teenage swimmers who are fast. billy fantone

ensignada
July 20th, 2007, 11:22 AM
I PM-ed you, Michelle.

BillS
July 20th, 2007, 12:43 PM
PM sent.

m2tall2
July 21st, 2007, 08:27 AM
I hope you have luck, I see the array of potential issues. I have not found a single OB/GYN that hasn't told me to quit swimming.

Blech.

Swim friendly doctors would even be great.

Again,

Good Luck!

The Fortress
July 21st, 2007, 08:31 AM
I hope you have luck, I see the array of potential issues. I have not found a single OB/GYN that hasn't told me to quit swimming.

Blech.

Swim friendly doctors would even be great.

Again,

Good Luck!

Seem like if you have any shoulder, knee, sinus, eye or other problems, the first thing docs say is to stay out of the water or quit swimming. They must all learn this line in medical school. The other day I heard a doc actually say they "hate" working with athletes. Sigh. I love my ART doc. He views it as his job to help me keep swimming, rather than succumbing to shoulder problems.

fanstone
July 21st, 2007, 11:35 AM
No, Fortress, in medical school they were still young, maybe athletes and healthy. It was later that they lost the battle against the sedentary society that is all around us. I had a heart guy tell me I was crazy to run longer distances, such as a marathon. When Kenneth Cooper was here some years ago, he mentioned the benefits of walking. He is just scared of litigation. He himself still runs his daily six miles. Remember, there are three groups that hate to lose their members: the alcoholics, the smokers, and the obese.

Betsy
July 21st, 2007, 04:17 PM
I think I can help you with a name to contact.
Send me a message at durrant6@cox.net
Betsy Durrant

inklaire
July 21st, 2007, 07:05 PM
Seem like if you have any shoulder, knee, sinus, eye or other problems, the first thing docs say is to stay out of the water or quit swimming.

Too true.

Actually, it seems to me that if you have any problems with any activity at all, the first thing they say is to quit doing whatever caused it -- running, lifting, swimming, biking -- anything but sitting on your rear watching television.

Walking is great exercise for sedentary people, but I don't see the benefit for fit people. I can barely get my heart rate up to half my max by walking, unless I hit the very steep inclines, which, by the way, I'm not supposed to do because of my questionable knees. :shakeshead:

swim4sanity
July 21st, 2007, 09:19 PM
I just need to find a doc who will go the long route with me rather than accept the first/easiest solution. How do you find doctors who are like that or who understand the athlete?

swim4sanity
July 21st, 2007, 09:24 PM
[QUOTE=m2tall2;100626]I hope you have luck, I see the array of potential issues. I have not found a single OB/GYN that hasn't told me to quit swimming.

Why are they telling you to quit? swimming is so good for the body (except in my case).

The Fortress
July 21st, 2007, 09:30 PM
I just need to find a doc who will go the long route with me rather than accept the first/easiest solution. How do you find doctors who are like that or who understand the athlete?

The burden is on the patient to be persistent, irritating as that may be, unless you get lucky and get a pro-active doc right away. I went from ortho #1, to ortho #2, to failed PT, to doing internet research, to tris, to ART, to an arthrogram, to prolo and now maybe to PRP. Don't accept what docs say necessarily. They may leap to the wrong conclusion without considering all options. Or give you a canned response. If you don't think it's right, don't accept it. You have to be determined.

I just hope your insurance covers it! That's my other pet peeve, Fanstone. There are many good docs, but I have yet to have any happy dealings with insurance companies. Prolotherapy, for example, is not covered by insurance even though it's a valid surgical alternative. But insurance companies prefer apparently to cut you open even though it's more expensive and is much more likely to permanently terminate your swimming career. Idiotic. My hubby, who is also a lawyer and used prolo for his hamstring (runner) is actually suing our health insurance company for coverage, armed with letters from three docs. That apparently is the only way to get an insurance company to listen to you. :shakeshead:

On the OB issue, it doesn't seem like Karen Duggan's doc is telling her to quit. Plenty of people swimming pregnant.

ALM
July 21st, 2007, 10:03 PM
There have been a number of women on my team over the years who have swum throughout their pregnancies. One of them swam our full 90-minute Saturday morning practice, then gave birth that night!

The only things their doctors restricted were:

1. No diving off the blocks
2. Keep the heart rate below 150

Oh, and something I've always found amusing - none of them wore maternity swimsuits. They just kept wearing their workout suits and let them get stretched out. Some of the women on the team who wear larger sizes "donated" their old suits to the pregnant swimmers.

--

dorothyrde
July 22nd, 2007, 08:14 AM
I just need to find a doc who will go the long route with me rather than accept the first/easiest solution. How do you find doctors who are like that or who understand the athlete?

Then you find a doctor who is an athlete. My GP runs....a lot. I see him all the time on the bike trails when I am out there biking. He understands when I go for an ailment that we have to figure out how to work with it so I can remain active, because he has the same mindset, he wants to keep running.

As far as working out when pregnant. I did not know how to swim when I was pregnant, I waited to learn till they were older. However, I did work-out faithfully, doing cardio machines and weight lifting up until birth, and continued afterwards once I was given the OK from my Doc. My OB/gyn liked I was active, and it made birth and recovery all that much easier.

SwimStud
July 22nd, 2007, 09:42 AM
Long shot Michele, but do you have any good other docs to ask about the specialist you seek? I asked my PT guys for the best knee guy, although I don't need an op, thankfully.

Slowswim
July 23rd, 2007, 08:55 AM
I have learned a couple things about doctors from my time in the medical field:

Doc are like auto mechanics. They guess based on what worked last time. If it doesn't work this time, they'll try something else. Granted they are good guessers, but medicine is not an exact science and they are not all-knowing.

Don't go to a doctor your same gender if you can help it. If your doc is the same as you, make sure there is a significant age difference. Docs subconsiously will see themselves if you are the same gender/age and will rule out things because the "that can't happen to me" syndrome can alter their thought process. Its just human nature.

From personal experience: the best docs I've had have all been athletes. They seem to understand the lifestyle and work to get you going in your sport more than the cigarette smoking docs who says you exercise too much.

aquageek
July 23rd, 2007, 09:30 AM
A small part of me thinks doctors are a bit more educated and insightful than an auto mechanic, but who knows what you get in rural Georgia. Also, I pick my health care providers by factors other than their sex and age differential.

Slowswim
July 23rd, 2007, 09:33 AM
A small part of me thinks doctors are a bit more educated and insightful than an auto mechanic, but who knows what you get in rural Georgia. Also, I pick my health care providers by factors other than their sex and age differential.

Maybe you just have bad mechanics? kidding

When picking a doc, just keep it in mind as a discriminator not the sole basis of selection.

swim4sanity
July 23rd, 2007, 09:34 AM
thanks for the great feedback. I swam all through my first pregnancy and I had a great pregnancy and I stretch out all my suits and competed in meets.

My doc is an athlete, just not a swimmer. When he told me not to swim I cried and he sort of just suggested running instead.

So I got yoga books and Pilates DVDs in the meantime until I find a way to swim again.

I got some good leads on OB/GYN docs as well that I will write to for mroe feedback.

So a big Thank you!

Fortress, Thank you for being persistent with your insurance companies. We have the power to make a difference with them.

scyfreestyler
July 23rd, 2007, 11:58 AM
Why is he telling you not to swim?

The Fortress
July 23rd, 2007, 03:31 PM
Fortress, Thank you for being persistent with your insurance companies. We have the power to make a difference with them.

Maybe. But they can always cancel your coverage and leave you stranded too. I had this happen with my home insurance policy after a pipe burst and flooded my basement. When I had the audacity to make a claim and pursue it vigorously, they paid up and then canceled my policy, forcing me to get emergency coverage. Still steamed about it. I just read that health care insurers are starting to do the same thing. I guess you're a bit safer if you have coverage through a company or firm. But they can also skyrocket your premiums. I just generally abhor insurance companies. Their mentality is deny, deny, deny. Most people don't have the time and energy to fight the denials.

Sorry, if I've offended anyone in the industry. Just my experience. I had to fight to get basic allergy meds covered, for god's sake.

SwimStud
July 23rd, 2007, 03:48 PM
You're looking at insurance companies all wrong.
They not intereseted in you. They just want endless premiums to be paid to them.
MO is bluster and frustrate and eventually the individual will give up and go away.

ALM
July 23rd, 2007, 03:50 PM
I had the opportunity to see Bill Clinton speak a couple of weeks ago. He was here as part of the celebration of the Truman Presidential Library's 50th anniversary. He spoke about Harry Truman and how he would react to today's current events. One thing he mentioned was that Truman, way back in his administration, was a proponent of a national health care system.

--

scyfreestyler
July 23rd, 2007, 03:52 PM
I had the opportunity to see Bill Clinton speak a couple of weeks ago. He was here as part of the celebration of the Truman Presidential Library's 50th anniversary. He spoke about Harry Truman and how he would react to today's current events. One thing he mentioned was that Truman, way back in his administration, was a proponent of a national health care system.

--
Just goes to show, nobody is perfect.

aquageek
July 23rd, 2007, 04:00 PM
For all the ignorant bashing of insurance companies, why don't you all advocate that gov't run madness and see things get 100 times worse, more expense and slow. Take a look at state run worker's comp pools and/or medicaid if you want proof of the effectiveness of gov't run insurance.

So, let me get this straight, you have the option at any time to cancel your coverage with an insurance company for any reason whatsoever, but you fault them for having the same right with you. If they have underwriting standards that say they don't want to cover folks with leaky pipes that may burst, that's their right. Just as you have the right to chose a company that has more relaxed standards to cover poorly maintained homes.

As for skyrocketing premiums, again, get the facts straight. Insurance companies are regulated by state insurance agencies and all rate increases must be approved by that particular state's agency. And, if you pay $500/year for home coverage and have a $30K water damage claim, why don't they have the right to raise your premium since it has been shown that after one claim you are much more likely to make another.

I don't know of a single reputable insurance company that has a policy of deny, deny, deny. You want to fault insurance companies when the real culprits are the folks who make fraudulent claims or excessive jury awards. When a zero damage whiplash lawsuit against you results in $50K of fake meds and a $100K jury award, don't come blaming the insurance carrier, who will pay that entire amount, all at the cost to you of an annual $2k or so premium.

If you are that dead set against insurance, you can always self insure. We do it for medical (HSAs) and you can buy minimal auto coverage for cheap and then insure yourself for any catastrophic claims, if you have cash on hand.

swim4sanity
July 23rd, 2007, 04:48 PM
yikes, I just want my vestibulitis cured without avoiding chlorine.

Willow
July 23rd, 2007, 04:51 PM
Michelle, have you checked out whether or not you can swim at a saline pool in your area?

Willow

Marcia Cleveland
July 23rd, 2007, 04:57 PM
I swam with the doctor who delivered BOTH of my kids then coached him across the English Channel a few years later.
He handled all of our ladies' 'issues' and seamlessly changed hats from Doctor to Swimmer and back and forth within the same conversation.

If you want his info, please email me at MarciaC944@gmail.com.

The Fortress
July 23rd, 2007, 05:36 PM
For all the ignorant bashing of insurance companies, why don't you all advocate that gov't run madness and see things get 100 times worse, more expense and slow. Take a look at state run worker's comp pools and/or medicaid if you want proof of the effectiveness of gov't run insurance.

So, let me get this straight, you have the option at any time to cancel your coverage with an insurance company for any reason whatsoever, but you fault them for having the same right with you. If they have underwriting standards that say they don't want to cover folks with leaky pipes that may burst, that's their right. Just as you have the right to chose a company that has more relaxed standards to cover poorly maintained homes.

As for skyrocketing premiums, again, get the facts straight. Insurance companies are regulated by state insurance agencies and all rate increases must be approved by that particular state's agency. And, if you pay $500/year for home coverage and have a $30K water damage claim, why don't they have the right to raise your premium since it has been shown that after one claim you are much more likely to make another.

I don't know of a single reputable insurance company that has a policy of deny, deny, deny. You want to fault insurance companies when the real culprits are the folks who make fraudulent claims or excessive jury awards. When a zero damage whiplash lawsuit against you results in $50K of fake meds and a $100K jury award, don't come blaming the insurance carrier, who will pay that entire amount, all at the cost to you of an annual $2k or so premium.

If you are that dead set against insurance, you can always self insure. We do it for medical (HSAs) and you can buy minimal auto coverage for cheap and then insure yourself for any catastrophic claims, if you have cash on hand.

I am merely relating my own experiences and my own opinion. I do not believe they qualify as "ignorant," your highness. Nor do I have a poorly maintained home. To the contrary, it is excellently maintained. I don't think most homeowners are constantly making maintenance checks of pipes in their basement in crawl spaces into which a mice can barely squeeze. And my claim was nowhere near 30K and I have no history of excessive claims. It was a preposterous termination of coverage.

I'm sure you are quite right that fraudulent claims and wild jury verdicts are to blame for high premiums as well. Personally, I think courts should assess attorneys fees against the offending plaintiff more often, which they rarely do.

My opinions are based on my personal experience, and I am perfectly entitled to detest insurance companies. -- as you detest many lawyers and waivers. For example, my company, a large one whom I won't name, never and I mean never covers any antibiotic besides amoxicillin. If you are on any RX meds, you're screwed. Hope you're doing better with your coverage. And we pay a flippin' fortune for family health insurance.

As for my professional experience with insurance companies, denial is the MO. You have your opinion and I have mine. But don't call me ignorant. Or you will get a drink dumped on your head in Austin.

Sydney
July 23rd, 2007, 06:23 PM
What makes him think that the pool is causing the vestibulitis? (For those that don't know, the vestibule is the area around the opening of the vagina.) There are any number of causes that may or may not be related to swimming at all. Did he tell you what the cause was? If the pool is exacerbating the inflammation, maybe just stay out of the water until it gets better. My impression is that most docs think that swimming during pregnancy is a great idea.

As a side note, my impression vis a vis doctors and physical activity is the following: They will always find some fault with your routine no matter what you do. If you are sedentary, then you must exercise. No wonder you are obese. If you run, be careful of injury! You should stop. If you swim, no wonder your shoulder hurts! You should stop. I think it makes them feel useful. Oh, and it effectively covers their rears as well.

swim4sanity
July 23rd, 2007, 07:00 PM
My doc guessed chlorine, i guess as process of elimination. It has began when I started swimming again 5 years ago and got worse as I continued. Treatment didn't work so now we are trying treatment with no swimming. It's like a big science experiment...YEAH! The pool I go to is consistently high in chlorine but it is the only one close to me (30 minutes away) so the chances of a saline pool nearby is slim. Although I am pushing for a new community center in our town with a pool so maybe we can push for saline as well.

Sometimes there are no known causes so I am hoping that chlorine is just making it worse rather than causing it.

Sorry if the convo makes anyone uncomfortable but a big thanks to everyone for your ideas.

I am also learning that I am lucky to be able to have the chance to swim at all as there are plenty of worse things in the world. This forum is also a great way to spread the positivity. If i didn't find it I probably would still be inhaling chocolate in between sobs (I'm so dramatic).

aquageek
July 24th, 2007, 07:56 AM
Fort:

You obviously need to switch to a higher rated company with a better track record. There are quite a few websites that rank the best for customer service (USAA, Amica, etc).

As to your health insurance issue, why don't you self insure or go super high deductible and HSA the rest? It is very easy to make insurance choices that don't break the bank.

I'd also suggest you talk to your HR person about the crack pipe prescription coverage you have. I've never heard of such a plan and you shouldn't blame the insurance carrier if your company has decided that is the plan they are going with. Or, buy your own supplemental prescription coverage if you must.

smontanaro
July 24th, 2007, 08:32 AM
As to your health insurance issue, why don't you self insure or go super high deductible and HSA the rest? It is very easy to make insurance choices that don't break the bank.

This probably deserves a new thread in the NSR forum, however I'll plunge ahead here... I'm curious about this. How do you structure a setup to use HSA for the wellness stuff and major medical (is that the right term) for the extreme stuff? What about the stuff in the middle, acute incidents - say appendicitis or a fractured wrist?

Thx,

Skip Montanaro

aquageek
July 24th, 2007, 09:36 AM
Your company would offer the program. Basically you pay a minimum amount for coverage for major issues and then have a huge deductible. You can self fund the deductible amount via a HSA (pretax). In our case, visits are run through the carrier for a fee reduction and we then pay the approved amount, in full, same for drugs. Certain wellness visits are free. All I know is the $$ I put in for medical coverage is actually used for medical as the admin overhead is minute.

The Fortress
July 24th, 2007, 10:18 AM
As to your health insurance issue, why don't you self insure or go super high deductible and HSA the rest? It is very easy to make insurance choices that don't break the bank.

I'd also suggest you talk to your HR person about the crack pipe prescription coverage you have. I've never heard of such a plan and you shouldn't blame the insurance carrier if your company has decided that is the plan they are going with. Or, buy your own supplemental prescription coverage if you must.

Geek:

I have Blue Cross/Blue Shield, which you think would provide decent coverage. However, my understanding of health insurance companies is that, with respect to prescription drugs, they have a formulary. They typically cover only certain drugs discounted by the manufacturers. Those are never the ones I am prescribed. They are older, less effective drugs. It is possible, in some instances, to get coverage for other RX meds, but you are always filling out paperwork, dancing through hoops and appealing BS. There is only so much time for that crap in life. It just irritates me when they don't cover the #1 prescribed drug for a certain problem, i.e., singulair or acular or omnicef or whatever.

As for HSA, when I worked more regularly, I had a health care reimbursement plan, but there was a cap. My coverage is now provided through Mr. Fort, who is an equity partner in a law firm, i.e., deemed self employed. My understanding is that HSA is only very recently available as an option. The bottom line is that there is still a boatload of paperwork and you have to be very persistent to secure coverage.

As to my prolo treatment, I have paid a boatload for something that doctors aver is the best and only logical treatment. Insurance companies don't like to cover non-surgical options. So sometimes it's helpful to be a lawyer. Somehow I suspect that Mr. Fort and I will get coverage if only so the insurance company can avoid a court ruling that would set a negative precedent for coverage for others. I don't think my cynicism is misplaced.

As for home insurance, I have been advised that it is SOP to terminate coverage after a claim for water damage is made. People are so paranoid about coverage termination or rate increases that no one ever reports a fender bender to their auto insurance company anymore. They just suck it up.

I'm sure as a former insurance exec, you see the fraudulent claims, which give you a different outlook. As a consumer, I believe that hassles and denials predominate.

In fact, on the thread topic, the only thing that isn't an enormous hassle is OBGYN stuff. Of course, Congress did have to pass a federal law so that insurance companies didn't kick women out of the hospital 24 hours after giving birth ...

aquageek
July 24th, 2007, 10:44 AM
I don't think your experiences are at all typical. First, I have much higher standards for insurance precisely because I have worked and have family who are high ups at insurance companies. I'll pay more for a good company versus the ones you seem to have chosen.

It is patently false that insurance companies don't cover non surgical options. It is a trend for years now that non surgical options are covered. Matter of fact, my wife is seeing a non traditional therapist of sorts for a leg issue, fully endorsed and fee scheduled. Keep in mind non surgical is exponentially cheaper than surgery.

As to drugs, you should check your plan before procuring it. It seems you are stuck with a lousy one by your husband's employer. His company chose the plan and you must either live with it or find alternate coverage. I've never heard of a plan that forces you to take dated drugs. I'd switch.

HSAs take 5 seconds, maybe less. They have been around a few years.

As to not reporting fender benders, wrong again. Insurance companies must employ legions of reps to handle these claims, that generate huge fraud. You may not have damage but the person you bumped is likely to claim some sort of bogus injury.

It sounds like you have lots of bad experiences but all are easily correctable with a small bit of research and planning.

SwimStud
July 24th, 2007, 10:56 AM
It sounds like you have lots of bad experiences but all are easily correctable with a small bit of research and planning.

Yes but what about single parents or "traditional" parents who work full time or are running kids all over the place and don't have the luxury of a nanny or chef to do half the domesticated work? You're small amount of time may not exist for these women, or men.

/throws skeptic water

aquageek
July 24th, 2007, 11:17 AM
This makes no sense at all. Both my wife and I work 70+ hours a week and somehow get it done, in addition to running kids all over the place. I guess you can waste money if you don't have the time to do the research.

scyfreestyler
July 24th, 2007, 11:27 AM
I guess I must be really spoiled. My employer pays 100% of our Blue Cross/Blue Shield PPO+ plan and I never have issues with denied claims, drugs not being covered, etc. As a matter of fact they (Blue Cross) actually paid for a chiropractic visit and several PT visits without question. No special forms or pre authorizations. Best of luck to those of you having trouble.

SwimStud
July 24th, 2007, 11:27 AM
This makes no sense at all. Both my wife and I work 70+ hours a week and somehow get it done, in addition to running kids all over the place. I guess you can waste money if you don't have the time to do the research.

wow 70hrs a week you'll be needing that health insurance...too much man...

CreamPuff
July 24th, 2007, 12:29 PM
Fort,

USAA is the best by far in terms of coverage and service for auto, homeowners and life. I typically hate insurance providers; however, I actually have had excellent experiences with USAA over the past 8 years. Do you have access to them?

I experienced exactly your issues with Blue Cross - formulary issues; admin issues; coverage issues. I feel your pain.

I lauged when our CEO couldn't believe that his common RX was not covered by the "formulary."

Clearly for some, myself included, there are drawbacks to the 70 hour workweek. . .
And many Blue Cross BS plans do not cover mental health issues.
:rofl:

The Fortress
July 24th, 2007, 12:53 PM
It is patently false that insurance companies don't cover non surgical options. It is a trend for years now that non surgical options are covered. Matter of fact, my wife is seeing a non traditional therapist of sorts for a leg issue, fully endorsed and fee scheduled. Keep in mind non surgical is exponentially cheaper than surgery.

As to drugs, you should check your plan before procuring it. It seems you are stuck with a lousy one by your husband's employer. His company chose the plan and you must either live with it or find alternate coverage. I've never heard of a plan that forces you to take dated drugs. I'd switch.

HSAs take 5 seconds, maybe less. They have been around a few years.


I didn't say that they didn't cover ALL non-surgical options. You are over-generalizing. Obviously, they cover certain PT, chiropractic visits, etc. up to a certain point and usually only a certain number of visits per year. However, Blue Cross is not covering our family's prolotherapy treatments, which are costly. I am probably going to switch to PRP, vastly more expensive, because I may be able to secure coverage for treatment. In the meantime, as I said, a lawsuit is the only thing that appears to get their attention. And fortunately, Mr. Fort is even more of a persistent bulldog than me.

As to drugs, I am obviously in agreement with (S)he-Man and have had a different experience than Matt. As to the formularly, this practice is generally followed by most health insurance companies -- not just mine. I know this from representing certain clients. I have taken to bringing a form along to my ENT and eye doc appointments for them to pre-sign, anticipating that there will be a denial of coverage. Sometimes, despite a form from the doc saying I need x specific medication, the company denies coverage again and more internal appeals are required. It is exhausting. All I'm asking for is a specific antibiotic that is designed to combat sinus infections, not some generic crap that doesn't work. I'm glad you and Mrs. Geek find time to deal with type of BS despite your 70+ hour work weeks, but I frankly can't always do it with my own schedule. Finding time to just get to a doc is a challenge for me. I don't have a nanny/chauffeur/cook either. I'm told the whole process wears many people down. Insurance companies know this, and they bank on people not to pursue some coverage denials because it ultimately isn't worth the effort. They just pay the $100 or so, and the insurance company wins that round.

Thanks for the tips about USAA. I will look into it when I come up for air from the next onslaught.

scyfreestyler
July 24th, 2007, 01:00 PM
Perhaps the differences can be explained by different product offerings within Blue Cross.

aquageek
July 24th, 2007, 01:06 PM
I'm glad you and Mrs. Geek find time to deal with type of BS despite your 70+ hour work weeks, but I frankly can't always do it with my own schedule.

Fortunately, we have no BS to deal with. USAA makes it easy, we're with them also. I suggest you take the few hours up front to choose your carriers and coverage wisely so you don't have so much angst with a poor choice afterwards. Maybe you are cursed cause we've never had a single issue ever with prescriptions. Course, it does give you something to gripe about.

SwimStud
July 24th, 2007, 01:09 PM
Fortunately, we have no BS to deal with. USAA makes it easy, we're with them also. I suggest you take the few hours up front to choose your carriers and coverage wisely so you don't have so much angst with a poor choice afterwards. Maybe you are cursed cause we've never had a single issue ever with prescriptions. Course, it does give you something to gripe about.

It has to be so damned tough to be perfectly happy in every single aspect of life...but thanks for sharing your good fortune and letting us all know how further down life's list we are than you. /worship

aquageek
July 24th, 2007, 01:16 PM
It has to be so damned tough to be perfectly happy in every single aspect of life...but thanks for sharing your good fortune and letting us all lknow how further down life's list we are than you. /worship

I don't understand the point of this but thanks for the compliment. Half full/half empty - take your pick.

I could sit around and whine about the man but the only man I'm worried about is scyfreestyler and his improving times.

The Fortress
July 24th, 2007, 01:26 PM
Course, it does give you something to gripe about.

Yes, I get to indulge in my detestation of insurance companies. Everyone needs something to hate once in awhile. Even you I've noticed.

I'd like to know if USAA is covering your ambien. Sorry, I'm stuck with BC/BS and their policy of non-coverage of most RX meds and other items. Glad you connections have helped you out. Hope you don't ever need prolo.

SwimStud
July 24th, 2007, 01:27 PM
I don't understand the point of this but thanks for the compliment. Half full/half empty - take your pick.

Well when you mock fort (and by others in her predicament them too) for needing something to gripe about you imply that their frustrationa nd complaints are not valid. Of course you don't understand. Everything's freaking rosey ain't it?

"My insurance company won't pay for my life saving operation.
I have to refinance my house and liquidate my 401k...Still, musn't grumble. Best to look on the brightside; at least my premiums stay the same. Gawd bless 'em!"

The Fortress
July 24th, 2007, 01:29 PM
It has to be so damned tough to be perfectly happy in every single aspect of life...but thanks for sharing your good fortune and letting us all know how further down life's list we are than you. /worship

I don't believe anyone can be happy in every single aspect of life working 70+ hours per week.

SwimStud
July 24th, 2007, 01:31 PM
I don't believe anyone can be happy in every single aspect of life working 70+ hours per week.

Amen to that...but that's why you can take Prozac...if your insurance company will pay for it...

aquageek
July 24th, 2007, 01:34 PM
I don't believe anyone can be happy in every single aspect of life working 70+ hours per week.

You got that right!!!

The Fortress
July 24th, 2007, 01:37 PM
Amen to that...but that's why you can take Prozac...if your insurance company will pay for it...

Haven't tried that yet ... highly doubtful it's covered. I almost fell down and fainted when my albuterol for asthmatic bronchitis was covered before zones.

I've been told there's a limit of psychiatric visits as well, so if you need a shrink, you could be screwed to. I think I'm reaching my annual allotment of NON-SURGICAL ART treatments soon ... Screwed again ...

stillwater
July 24th, 2007, 01:39 PM
My humble opinion is that insurance companies are gamblers that often welch on thier bets.

SwimStud
July 24th, 2007, 01:39 PM
Haven't tried that yet ... highly doubtful. I almost fell down and fainted when my albuterol for asthmatic bronchitis was covered before zones.

I've been told there's a limit of psychiatric visits as well, so if you need a shrink, you could be screwed to. I think I'm reaching my annual allotment of NON-SURGICAL ART treatments soon ... Screwed again ...

"...are you sure your injury isn't the result of a traffic accident?"

Please say it is so we can get out of paying for this!

The Fortress
July 24th, 2007, 01:40 PM
You got that right!!!


Soon, amidst the innumerable loopholes and disclaimers and exceptions (all drafted by evil lawyers, no doubt), there will be section II(D)(8)(iv) which disclaims any coverage for those working over 40 hours a week.

The Fortress
July 24th, 2007, 01:43 PM
"...are you sure your injury isn't the result of a traffic accident?"

Please say it is so we can get out of paying for this!

Nope, sorry to disappoint. I have been rear ended at least 4-5 times in the last year though. Fortunately, it always destroys the bumper of the idiot driver rear ending me. I have a hitch on my car that protects my rear bumper. Think of all the claims I didn't have to make ...

And, come to think of it, think of all the water damage/leaky roof claims I didn't have to make because I replaced my roof in a timely fashion, thereby engaging in responsible home maintenance! I didn't even bitch about that.

swimshark
July 24th, 2007, 04:10 PM
Perhaps the differences can be explained by different product offerings within Blue Cross.

So true. My dad has done business with BC/BS fror years helping with the conracts. Each company that hires BC can decide what they want to cover. I have BC/BS through the Fed Govt and they cover 99% of medications (never denied any of mine) but their dental is horrible. We're talking paying only $17 of a dental exam. I just spent $4000 out of pocket on dental work. They offer supplimental but it's around $700 a year for my husband and I to be covered (not our son) and only covers $1200 a year. Not good spending to save $500 to me. My point is, each employer can pick what they want their employees to get for coverage.

Fort, USAA is awesome. I have it thanks for my dad (Army officer) and my husband (Navy officer). If you are elligible (need to have someone as an officer or certain enlisted in the military) then it's worth it. I have homeowners and auto ins, credit card, savings account, etc.

As for insurance companies cancelling after a claim, it's becoming common practice. The wany to avoid it is to do as much as possible not to ever call them. Don't even call to find out it they will cover something because one company cancelled someone for calling to ask a question!

Alison

The Fortress
July 24th, 2007, 05:40 PM
So true. My dad has done business with BC/BS fror years helping with the conracts. Each company that hires BC can decide what they want to cover. I have BC/BS through the Fed Govt and they cover 99% of medications (never denied any of mine) but their dental is horrible. We're talking paying only $17 of a dental exam. I just spent $4000 out of pocket on dental work. They offer supplimental but it's around $700 a year for my husband and I to be covered (not our son) and only covers $1200 a year. Not good spending to save $500 to me. My point is, each employer can pick what they want their employees to get for coverage.

Fort, USAA is awesome. I have it thanks for my dad (Army officer) and my husband (Navy officer). If you are elligible (need to have someone as an officer or certain enlisted in the military) then it's worth it. I have homeowners and auto ins, credit card, savings account, etc.

As for insurance companies cancelling after a claim, it's becoming common practice. The wany to avoid it is to do as much as possible not to ever call them. Don't even call to find out it they will cover something because one company cancelled someone for calling to ask a question!

Alison

Nope, no military connection. The federal govt always has better coverage than private companies. It's a perk of the job. That and the vacation time and flex hours.

scyfreestyler
July 24th, 2007, 05:58 PM
My father in law works for the DOD and they just recently got their dental coverage back. Not sure what the deal was but they were not happy about it. I prefer to keep as much out of the governments hot little hands as possible.

swim4me
July 24th, 2007, 06:52 PM
Nope, no military connection. The federal govt always has better coverage than private companies. It's a perk of the job. That and the vacation time and flex hours.

USAA is not a government company, but they provide coverage for members of the military and their ex-dependents.

The Fortress
July 24th, 2007, 07:59 PM
USAA is not a govermant company, but they provide coverage for members of the military and their ex-dependents.

I know! I was just commenting in addition that the people I know working in the federal govt -- which is a lot where I live -- generally have good insurance coverage and benefits. Although I think dental coverage is a problem for all.

ALM
July 24th, 2007, 10:58 PM
There was an interesting editorial in our paper today about how our country needs to shift from a "disease" care system to a "health" care system. :cane:

The writer cited some statistics from the CDC. Preventable illnesses and medical conditions constitute 80% of the burden of illness and 90% of all health-care costs, and account for 8 of the 9 leading causes of death in the US.

He also quotes two interesting paragraphs from IRS Publication 502 on Medical and Dental Expenses:

--"Dancing lessons - you cannot include the cost of dancing lessons, swimming lessons, etc., even if they are recommended by a doctor, if they are only for the improvement of general health."

--"Health club dues - you cannot include in medical expenses health club dues or amounts paid to improve one's general health or to releive physical or mental discomfort not related to a particular medical condition."

--

Blackbeard's Peg
July 24th, 2007, 11:53 PM
I think dental coverage is a problem for all.
Not if you never go to the dentist, says the guy who just got back from playing a hockey game.:angel:

Slowswim
July 25th, 2007, 08:20 AM
USAA is not a government company, but they provide coverage for members of the military and their ex-dependents.

Correct. The Military uses Tricare (which is actually Humana) for healthcare and United Condordia for dental care. Both are private companies.

The Active Military can opt to go to a Military Treatment Facility on a post or base for free, but you have no choice in doctors or treatment.:2cents:

Its Congress that has the best health and dental plan!