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Scottly
July 30th, 2007, 04:51 PM
Maybe I'm just an air head but I have the hardest time keeping track of how many laps I've done on a long swim. Does anyone have a good method/trick?

scyfreestyler
July 30th, 2007, 05:08 PM
You might try counting distance (meters/yards) as opposed to laps (1,2,3,4).

beluga
July 30th, 2007, 06:07 PM
I use my watch. Its one of the Timex Ironman models. It has big numbers and a 100 lap memory. The button on the front counts laps, I press during my turn every 100yds. I have it set to display the split on the big numbers, so I know what my pace is and/or helps on those times when I have trouble counting to four.

It also has an interval timer, set the desired interval and to repeat at end, and you're good to go. It beeps at the end of every interval and quick glance tells you if it was 6 or 7 intervals completed w/o wasting you rest period figuring it out on the pace clock

Cost about $35 in Target of Walmart.

JennyS
July 30th, 2007, 06:47 PM
I prefer to count 100's. So for a 500 I only count to 5. Not only is it easier to keep track of the distance, it makes the swim feel shorter and more manageable! Good luck!

Scottly
July 31st, 2007, 09:36 AM
I prefer to count 100's. So for a 500 I only count to 5. Not only is it easier to keep track of the distance, it makes the swim feel shorter and more manageable! Good luck!

This is what I do. But for some reason when I'm doing a 1600 I forget where I am between the 300 and 400 and the 1300 and 1400. And I am so consistant at forgetting it's a amazing. I'm sure I end up doing an extra 100 becasue I do the 400 twice which is not big deal except when I'm tring to time myself. I've tried little word games to try to remember what 100 I'm in but that's even more confusing. Maybe I'll just get better at it as I swim more.

This also brings up a really stupid newbie question. What's a lap? One 50 meter length or a 100 meter there and back?

knelson
July 31st, 2007, 10:42 AM
This also brings up a really stupid newbie question. What's a lap? One 50 meter length or a 100 meter there and back?

You'll get some people who call one length a lap and others who consider a lap to be the complete there and back circuit. For that reason it's just best to talk in terms of lengths. Then everyone knows what you're talking about.

ALM
July 31st, 2007, 11:05 AM
Get a stack of kickboards. Place them at the end of your lane. Every 200 yards, move one kickboard over into a new stack.

You can use this counting method with various objects, but kickboards are usually easy to find at the pool.

--

Glider
July 31st, 2007, 11:19 AM
This would work for the first 500 at my pool before the noodlers/kids would walk off with one or two of the kickboards. :bolt:

It might tend to shorten your practice a few reps:shakeshead:


Get a stack of kickboards. Place them at the end of your lane. Every 200 yards, move one kickboard over into a new stack.

You can use this counting method with various objects, but kickboards are usually easy to find at the pool.

--

3strokes
July 31st, 2007, 10:25 PM
This would work for the first 500 at my pool before the noodlers/kids would walk off with one or two of the kickboards. :bolt:

It might tend to shorten your practice a few reps:shakeshead:

But................ if some new pool user thinks that that is where you deposit your kickboards after using them (on top of the stack), you might find yourself having broken several World records...............

SearayPaul
August 1st, 2007, 12:24 AM
The floats on the lane lines work well for counting. When you get in the pool slide the floats all the way to one end of the lane. You will be surprised how much spacing is available. On each repeat move one float forward. I also keep track of time and know about how many minutes I swim and what distance should have been covered. If the distance and time do not add up I messed up.

marlenb
August 1st, 2007, 12:37 AM
I've always used a "Super Mario" counting strategy. Each 100 I swim I note each lap as 1-1, 1-2, 1-3, 1-4, start at 2-1 for the next 100 and so on. It works for me, but I bet it could be tiresome for some people.

DAP
August 1st, 2007, 12:50 AM
I have an electronic lap counter that wraps around the index finger, and laps are counted by pressing a button with the thumb. It times the laps also. Unfortunately, as often happens with electronics that are used in water, my lap counter button has been malfunctioning, so I have gone back to trying to count in my head.

nkfrench
August 1st, 2007, 08:56 AM
This is why I usually break up the long swims into a set of intervals with very short rest, such as 100's. Example= start every 1:55 so that you know you've done 12 when you are back up to the top of the clock. Or if you're faster, pick another interval but not on 2:00, 1:30, etc. Don't make the math too hard as that's its own set of too much thinking.

Another way is to alternate free with IM; etc.

This is much easier with a pace clock than with a wristwatch as you can watch the paceclock while you're swimming but seems like that has its own set of problems such as people standing in front of it, moving a portable one where you can't see it, etc. [Whoops, drifting back into "Rants".]

some_girl
August 1st, 2007, 04:13 PM
I am a big fan of breathing every 3 for 75 and then every 2 for the last 25. I also get my splits (part of the reason I breathe every two: easier to see the clocks). I pretty much never forget which 100 I am on, but I also don't swim much over 500.