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ande
August 29th, 2007, 02:55 PM
Thought Y'all might find these interesting

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_records_in_swimming

50 fr
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_record_progression_50_metres_freestyle

100 fr
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_record_progression_100_metres_freestyle

200 FR
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_record_progression_200_metres_freestyle

400 FR
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_record_progression_400_metres_freestyle

1,500 FR
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_record_progression_1500_metres_freestyle

100 BR
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_record_progression_100_metres_breaststroke

100 fl
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_record_progression_100_metres_butterfly

200 fl
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_record_progression_200_metres_butterfly

100 IM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_record_progression_100_metres_medley

200 IM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_record_progression_200_metres_medley

400 IM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_record_progression_400_metres_medley

knelson
August 29th, 2007, 03:25 PM
The men's 1500 free has had an amazing progression. On Sept. 2, 1964 Roy Saari became the first man under 17 minutes with a 16:58.7. A mere eight years later Mike Burton had pared off over a minute to 15:52.58 set at the Olympics in Munich. Just four years after that, at the Montreal Games, Brian Goodell knocked off another 50 seconds to bring it down to 15:02.40. That is pretty incredible.

scyfreestyler
August 29th, 2007, 03:27 PM
If only I had been born 75 years sooner.

jim clemmons
August 29th, 2007, 06:09 PM
If only I had been born 75 years sooner...

...or a girl...and maybe you wouldn't have had to have been born quite so much "sooner".

Ian Smith
August 29th, 2007, 11:18 PM
In the LCM 100 free records, the Jon Henricks record of 1956 (55.4) is SLOWER than the older 1954 record of Dick Cleveland (54.8).

The US Swim site alludes to a rules change in 1956.

What rule change was implemented that would SLOW DOWN times?

david.margrave
August 30th, 2007, 02:48 AM
Another swim camp story, Brian Goodell and coach Ron Ballatore were at a camp I went to in Bozeman, MT in 1982.

Peter Cruise
August 30th, 2007, 12:25 PM
Ian- the slower time was caused by the brief period in time when US swimmers were required to salute the flag at least once in every race.

Blackbeard's Peg
August 30th, 2007, 11:00 PM
If only I had been born 75 years sooner.

Hehe I'd have been a force in the 100 and 200 free's in the depression.
Then, been a WWII-era force in the 400.
Ande - great find!!

ALM
August 30th, 2007, 11:19 PM
In the LCM 100 free records, the Jon Henricks record of 1956 (55.4) is SLOWER than the older 1954 record of Dick Cleveland (54.8).

The US Swim site alludes to a rules change in 1956.

What rule change was implemented that would SLOW DOWN times?

Here's your answer...

From: http://www.fina.org/swimming/news/world_Records_history.php

"In 1908, world records under 800 m could be set in pools of any length over 25 yards and it was possible for records to be set mid-course not just at the end of the pool. This resulted in all major world records for most of the Olympic events to be set in short course pools and was in effect until 1956..."

"At the FINA Congress in 1952, the USA and Japan proposed to keep separate records for long course (50 m) and short course (25 m), but the Congress opposed this 56 - 32 and it would take another four years for FINA to clarify the situation, eliminating all short course records."

ALM
August 30th, 2007, 11:22 PM
More interesting stuff from that same article...

From: http://www.fina.org/swimming/news/world_Records_history.php

Four record swims in one afternoon
"When breaststroke was added to the Olympic program in 1956, the first winner Masaru Furukawa (JPN) swam the 200 metres mostly underwater. Furukawa was dominant in the stroke from 1954-56. The rules for the new strokes allowed underwater swimming and quickly it was discovered to be much faster than swimming on the surface. He broke the 200 m world record twice on 10 April 1954. But even more remarkable was 1 October 1955 when he broke all four world records on the same afternoon. Furukawa set the marks for 200 m and 220 yards (2:31.0 and 2:31.9) by taking his first breath at the 25 m turn, breathing again before the second turn and taking only three breaths on each of his six other laps. Later he swam 100 yards and 100 m in 1:01.4 and 1:08.2 taking five breaths during the whole race.

He posted a long course record in August 1955 when he swam 2:33.7. It took six years for Chet Jastremski (USA) swimming on the surface to better this time by a tenth.

After Furukawa's Olympic win in 1956, FINA put an end to underwater breaststroke and to his domination."

Ian Smith
September 1st, 2007, 05:15 PM
Here's your answer...

From: http://www.fina.org/swimming/news/world_Records_history.php

"In 1908, world records under 800 m could be set in pools of any length over 25 yards and it was possible for records to be set mid-course not just at the end of the pool. This resulted in all major world records for most of the Olympic events to be set in short course pools and was in effect until 1956..."

"At the FINA Congress in 1952, the USA and Japan proposed to keep separate records for long course (50 m) and short course (25 m), but the Congress opposed this 56 - 32 and it would take another four years for FINA to clarify the situation, eliminating all short course records."

Thx for the answer, Anna.

They probably know what length pools were used to do each of the records; you'd think they would assign them LCM or SCM from the beginning and not categorize them all as LCM before the official rule in 1956.

geochuck
September 1st, 2007, 05:57 PM
These two are the guys I had to race.
In the LCM 100 free records, the Jon Henricks record of 1956 (55.4) is SLOWER than the older 1954 record of Dick Cleveland (54.8).

The US Swim site alludes to a rules change in 1956.

What rule change was implemented that would SLOW DOWN times?

Some changes that happened to make swim times faster after they set records, not to touch the wall with the hand. New types of dives. Changes in training methods (more work). Changes in stroke technique.

Ian Smith
September 2nd, 2007, 01:55 PM
These two are the guys I had to race.


Henricks had retired when I swam a 100 yds against John Devitt (of 1960 Olympic 100m gold fame and WR holder after Henricks). Needless to say, I came second.
Ian.

geochuck
September 2nd, 2007, 03:07 PM
Devitt and Hendricks I raced them both in the fina meet following the 56 Olympics. I beat them in the 50 meters. Devitt sure was a good swimmer. He had a windmill stroke, no front quadrant style there. He had a great start, a step away from track start. Here is a video of john Devitt swimming and his start. http://www.ishof.org/video_archive/swimming/john_devitt.htm

Lots of videos here I just watched Allan Ford swim the 100. What a terrible dive he had. http://www.ishof.org/video_archive/swimming/

3strokes
September 2nd, 2007, 06:20 PM
Originally Posted by geochuck http://forums.usms.org/images/buttons/viewpost.gif (http://forums.usms.org/showthread.php?p=105048#post105048)
These two are the guys I had to race.



Henricks had retired when I swam a 100 yds against John Devitt (of 1960 Olympic 100m gold fame and WR holder after Henricks). Needless to say, I came second.
Ian.

............. and Ian Smith is the guy in whose age group (65-69) I will be competing next year. Yikes! Talk about being a so-so-medium-to-large fish in my pond this year (top 5 in Canada 50 free LCM) and then seeing my name in the same listing as Ian Smith next year. (Guess I'll have to scroll down five or six screenfulls just to glimpse my name.................)

Allen Stark
September 3rd, 2007, 12:20 AM
George,that is an amazing website:groovy:

geochuck
September 3rd, 2007, 09:06 AM
Allen that site has been sitting there for a while. When I first watched the videos last year most did not work. Now they are nearly all working. I was glad to see Devitt swimming I raced him 5 times he was a very strong and confident guy. I used to give all the Aussies something to talk about. When ever I talked to them I played the drunk, even though I barely took a drink.

Konrads was a great little swimmer, I was his protector during a fight. One of the Canadian swimmers wanted to beat him up, he was 15 or 16 and the Canadian was 20 and a big guy. I threw the guy through the wall at the residence and got Konrads and a young Canadian swimmer Allen Brew out of our Quarters.

Ian Smith
September 3rd, 2007, 09:57 AM
Konrads was a great little swimmer.


George, funny you should mention Konrads - at the same meet I swam against him in a leg of a relay vs the Australian team. He was a distance guy (held the 400 WR), slower than Devitt but still did a pretty good 100.

geochuck
September 3rd, 2007, 10:08 AM
Allen Brew and John Konrads were buddies and would hang around me. Where ever I went they would tag along. They were both interested in a Scotish female swimmer who was much older then they were. She was a doctor but a very good swimmer and was at least 10 years older than the both of them. That is what the fight was about.

Lots of the distance guys swam on those relays Konrads could go pretty good no matter the distance. It is amazing how much Australia contibuted to World Record Progressions

mattson
September 3rd, 2007, 10:21 AM
I threw the guy through the wall at the residence ...

Sounds like dryland cross-training for some of your open water swims. :drink: