PDA

View Full Version : Dynamic Swimwear for today's muslim female/ Burqinis



CreamPuff
September 10th, 2007, 01:26 PM
My husband just sent me this link.

http://www.ahiida.com/

And here I am complaining about a bit of soreness from doubles.
I got it easy.

Looks like the burqinis cost about as much as a fastskin.

SwimStud
September 10th, 2007, 03:34 PM
My husband just sent me this link.

http://www.ahiida.com/

And here I am complaining about a bit of soreness from doubles.
I got it easy.

Looks like the burqinis cost about as much as a fastskin.

Well that may fall within the Islamic guidelines of "modesty" but you'd be a fool to try to swim in that...it looks like a drowning waiting to happen.
I tried to swim with my Coolibar shirt on...you want to talk about drag...

CreamPuff
September 10th, 2007, 07:43 PM
Yea. Was trying to determine if the site was for real or not.

ensignada
September 11th, 2007, 05:39 PM
Finally! A swimsuit company I can model for!

knelson
September 11th, 2007, 06:23 PM
I think it's for real. Keep in mind a body suit wouldn't conform to the strict Muslim dress code for women. Coverage isn't enough, it also must not be form fitting.

3strokes
September 11th, 2007, 06:45 PM
My husband just sent me this link.

http://www.ahiida.com/




Question posed completely tongue-in-cheek and for the fun of it (just couldn't resist):
Why would your husband send you this (particular) link?:bolt:

lanehog
September 11th, 2007, 08:34 PM
It's totally for real. I read an article a while back about these, and how they've allowed Muslim women in Australia to go to the beach and also to be lifeguards there.

The bodysuit doesn't conform to the strictest Islamic dress standard because it's form-fitting, but I know that at least Pakistan has recently allowed women to compete in swimming wearing the full coverage Fastskin-type suits. The women train with other women and wear regular swimsuits, but for competitions where there are men, they wear the full bodysuits.

I think it's pretty interesting how these suits that were developed simply for speed might have the unintentional consequence of opening up competitive swimming to women in the Arab world.

CreamPuff
September 11th, 2007, 10:12 PM
Question posed completely tongue-in-cheek and for the fun of it (just couldn't resist):
Why would your husband send you this (particular) link?:bolt:

Really! I think he's trying to say that my new Speedo pink camo suit is simply too obnoxious!

phdude
September 12th, 2007, 12:07 AM
Interesting-my officemate is a Muslim girl from Malaysia who conforms to the strict dress laws - not to the point of wearing a burqua, but is always fully covered and wearing a headdress. When I showed her the website she thought it was one of the funniest things she'd ever seen, and wouldn't be caught dead in it!

scyfreestyler
September 12th, 2007, 12:12 AM
Really! I think he's trying to say that my new Speedo pink camo suit is simply too obnoxious!

Pink camo sounds nice! Just ordered myself a black camo jammer from the same Speedo collection I believe.


Regarding the original content of this thread, I am sure it is real. And how very unfortunate IMHO.

ensignada
September 12th, 2007, 01:13 PM
Unfortunate in what way, Matt?

Many women who have the freedom to choose dress modestly do it as a way of showing respect to and/or worshipping God. If they need to incorporate that into their swimsuit attire, this is a way to do it.


Edit:
I just went back and read some of the testimonials from wearers. Many of these women were doing aquatic exercises in street clothing or staying out of the water all together before wearing one.

scyfreestyler
September 12th, 2007, 01:24 PM
Without getting into too much detail, my comments were regarding states such as Iran who dictate what women will wear regardless of their religion (although clearly derived from religious ideas). If somebody truly decides to wear such a garment on their own accord that is fine. However, in many places this is not a choice at all. Very sad...perhaps a bit disgusting.

aquageek
September 12th, 2007, 01:29 PM
Many women who have the freedom to choose dress modestly do it as a way of showing respect to and/or worshipping God.

Or, alternatively, as a way to stay alive in a culture where extremeism is commonplace and deviation from male mandated dress codes, especially by females, can have awful consequences.

scyfreestyler
September 12th, 2007, 01:32 PM
http://www.swimmingworldmagazine.com/lane9/news/14275.asp


Article about this type of swimwear.

ensignada
September 12th, 2007, 01:50 PM
In many Muslim countries, separate beaches and swimming pools are provided for women and children. This company is out of Australia where separate bathing isn't a wide option.

To us westerners, the idea of dress being mandated is oppressive. I have several friends from Iran who have told me that under the burqas or long coats, are the lastest fashions and accessories. The conservative streetwear is really to keep strangers' eyes out.

gull
September 12th, 2007, 01:52 PM
Many women who have the freedom to choose dress modestly do it as a way of showing respect to and/or worshipping God. If they need to incorporate that into their swimsuit attire, this is a way to do it.

You might want to read A Thousand Splendid Suns.

aquageek
September 12th, 2007, 01:54 PM
The conservative streetwear is really to keep strangers' eyes out.

Or to prevent being stoned to death.

scyfreestyler
September 12th, 2007, 01:56 PM
In many Muslim countries, separate beaches and swimming pools are provided for women and children. This company is out of Australia where separate bathing isn't a wide option.

To us westerners, the idea of dress being mandated is oppressive. I have several friends from Iran who have told me that under the burqas or long coats, are the lastest fashions and accessories. The conservative streetwear is really to keep strangers' eyes out.

So what's the point of the high fashion if it must be hidden underneath?

smontanaro
September 12th, 2007, 02:01 PM
So what's the point of the high fashion if it must be hidden underneath?

Don't many women dress as much for other women as for men?

Skip

scyfreestyler
September 12th, 2007, 02:09 PM
Don't many women dress as much for other women as for men?

Skip
Well, apparently in Iran exclusively so.

scyfreestyler
September 12th, 2007, 02:17 PM
That aside, there is a school of thought about infidelity being easier due to the use of the Hagib and Burka in some countries. Nobody knows for sure who is who.

Personally I find it equally "curious" to walk around with ash smeared on your head once a year, or doing what the heck you like throughout life and then accepting Christ 2 mins before you croak and being saved.

"Do unto others."
"Wwhen you you treat your Brother as you would have him would treat you then you will be a true believer."
Sounds the same to me.



Absolutely agree with you on these points...especially the 2 minutes before you croak bit.

Unfortunately, it seems to me that religion causes much of the pain and suffering in this world. Something that is supposed to save us is actually killing us.


Oh yes, I think Fox and CNN are for the birds.

aquageek
September 12th, 2007, 02:17 PM
Yo, American, take a look at the calendar and then you might understand why a few of us have strong opinions on extremeism.

BTW - no one here is bashing women. Conversely, we are saying the burqa can be used as a way to enforce antiquated and outdated rules of a paternalistic culture.

phdude
September 12th, 2007, 03:39 PM
Most Americans have strong opinions on violent Muslim extremists, but getting angry about a particular kind of swimwear that is accepted in another culture is taking it a little far. Regardless of its name, the "burqini" isn't made only for women that are forced into them by paternalistic societies such as the Taliban. Instead, it gives the opportunity for conservatively-dressed Muslim women in all countries to swim in coed environments without feeling like they have betrayed their belief systems. If that's the only thing that gets them in the pool, what's so "sad" about it? I don't agree with most of the Muslim beliefs personally, but I don't see a problem with them being more conservative than average, especially if it is of their own free will. Nor do I see a problem with the way the Amish dress, or any other social group that's sort of out of the mainstream with society today, as long as the members of it are doing so of their own volition.

As long as they don't mind sharing the pool with me in my speedo!:laugh2:


Yo, American, take a look at the calendar and then you might understand why a few of us have strong opinions on extremeism.

BTW - no one here is bashing women. Conversely, we are saying the burqa can be used as a way to enforce antiquated and outdated rules of a paternalistic culture.

fanstone
September 12th, 2007, 03:56 PM
When my daughter, then aged 7, went to visit cousins in Arizona, she couldn't show off her picture of her wearing a Boa Constrictor, around her neck. The picture was taken when she was visiting some other relatives on her mother's side, up in Manaus, the main city of the Amazon River. Well, she had on bikini bottoms, but no tops, so the picture was considered "bad" by my american cousins. Or maybe they associated the snake with the strip girls. So evil is in the eyes of the beholder and is surely a huge part of culture, the way you dress. When younger, my wife had three sets of bikinis, one to wear at the local club, the other to wear at a beach in São Paulo (a more conservative state of Brazil) and a third to wear in Rio de Janeiro. The sizes of the bikinis varied with whoever would be watching. That said, I must say that at the swimming pool where I train, which is not a club, but a paid for institution, the ladies wear the long old fashioned maillots, forgot what they are called in English, the bathing suits. You don't want to be distracted by skimpy swim wear while working (training). I kinda think going topless is dumb and takes away more than it adds. And I have been naked in a Sauna in Europe, but felt terribly self-conscious and it didn't seem right. Too much time wearing bathing trunks in Spas have spoilt me, the mixed Spas. Lastly, at home, we went pretty much the nude way in the rooms and the huge tub in the bathroom, my wife, myself and the two kids...I had been brought up with too many "traumas" concerning nudity by my Mississippi mother and wanted a more relaxed attitude with my own two kids...we do go totally nude in the Sauna (small cubicle in my own bathroom) if the occasion happens and they are around, since both are grownups now. But just the four of us, the immediate family...billy fanstone

The Fortress
September 12th, 2007, 04:07 PM
BTW - no one here is bashing women.

Since when?

inklaire
September 12th, 2007, 04:17 PM
When I was learning to swim, one of the students quit because she was swallowing water during Ramadan, but her swimming attire was quite ordinary. On the other hand, another student wore a t-shirt and trunks for the entire session, for modesty, and he was a man. Another young girl used to swim at the pool I visited, and she always wore long board shorts and a baggy shirt, but I'm sure religion had nothing to do with it, rather anxiety over her figure.

We see all sorts. Regardless of everything else, I expect that those who learn to swim fully clothed are better prepared for an accident. I think if I fell into the water dressed, I'd struggle mightily.

scyfreestyler
September 12th, 2007, 04:17 PM
When my daughter, then aged 7, went to visit cousins in Arizona, she couldn't show off her picture of her wearing a Boa Constrictor, around her neck. The picture was taken when she was visiting some other relatives on her mother's side, up in Manaus, the main city of the Amazon River. Well, she had on bikini bottoms, but no tops, so the picture was considered "bad" by my american cousins. Or maybe they associated the snake with the strip girls. So evil is in the eyes of the beholder and is surely a huge part of culture, the way you dress. When younger, my wife had three sets of bikinis, one to wear at the local club, the other to wear at a beach in São Paulo (a more conservative state of Brazil) and a third to wear in Rio de Janeiro. The sizes of the bikinis varied with whoever would be watching. That said, I must say that at the swimming pool where I train, which is not a club, but a paid for institution, the ladies wear the long old fashioned maillots, forgot what they are called in English, the bathing suits. You don't want to be distracted by skimpy swim wear while working (training). I kinda think going topless is dumb and takes away more than it adds. And I have been naked in a Sauna in Europe, but felt terribly self-conscious and it didn't seem right. Too much time wearing bathing trunks in Spas have spoilt me, the mixed Spas. Lastly, at home, we went pretty much the nude way in the rooms and the huge tub in the bathroom, my wife, myself and the two kids...I had been brought up with too many "traumas" concerning nudity by my Mississippi mother and wanted a more relaxed attitude with my own two kids...we do go totally nude in the Sauna (small cubicle in my own bathroom) if the occasion happens and they are around, since both are grownups now. But just the four of us, the immediate family...billy fanstone


Nothing wrong with nudity. We're all human...nothing to be ashamed of.

geochuck
September 12th, 2007, 11:45 PM
I believe anyone should wear what they want. Our ladies in the past wore some pretty strange looking garments. Thank goodness some one invented the bikini. Speedos can be very revealing also.

Fort have I added enough punctuation.

The Fortress
September 12th, 2007, 11:58 PM
I believe anyone should wear what they want.

Fort have I added enough punctuation.

Couldn't agree more. Wear what you want. As long as someone's not picking it out for you.

Punctuation sorta OK good. An improvement perhaps. From what I've read, Chuckie's a lucky woman. Devoted hubby who doesn't call women names. No wonder you're married so long.

Peter Cruise
September 13th, 2007, 03:08 AM
Re the burgini, I'm for any step that enables any individual, male or female, to experience greater personal freedom to any extent in their life. There are cultural biases built into all of us, no matter how objective we think we are; be glad we live where we can celebrate differences rather than persecute them.

3strokes
September 13th, 2007, 07:03 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Fortress http://forums.usms.org/images/buttons/viewpost.gif (http://forums.usms.org/showthread.php?p=106023#post106023)
My strategy is to be a "wuss" and swim shorter races than tris.



Amen Sistah!

Gosh
I just realized that:
a) I only swim the 50m (free) and very rarely the 100m
b) FlyQueen "Amen"ed that.
b) I am a Muslim

Does this mean I should go out and buy myself a Burquini?
And would I be arrested if it's too form fitting?

geochuck
September 13th, 2007, 08:19 AM
I was in Egypt and did not like the fact that when I walked down the street with a male Egyptian swimmer he wanted to hold my hand.

When I met an Egytian swimmer he wanted to hug me and kiss me.

These things were not for me.

My friend was in the movie theatre with his wife, he had his arm over the back of his wifes chair. Every one in the theatre stood up and jeered and pointed at us.

Now does this mean they are wrong or we were out of step with their culture.

gull
September 13th, 2007, 09:40 AM
Perhaps we are comparing apples and oranges. In a fundamentalist Islamic society, like Afghanistan under the Taliban, women are oppressed, treated as little more than property, and are not able to freely choose their clothing (unless they want to be stoned).

Stillhere
September 13th, 2007, 11:26 AM
"Violent Muslim extremists"--Where is Harry Truman when you need him?

3strokes
September 13th, 2007, 02:59 PM
I was in Egypt and did not like the fact that when I walked down the street with a male Egyptian swimmer he wanted to hold my hand.

When I met an Egytian swimmer he wanted to hug me and kiss me.

These things were not for me.

Now does this mean they are wrong or we were out of step with their culture.

Some of these actions or gestures are not seen as wrong in the Arab world. (Of course when you say a man wanted to kiss you, that was meant to be in a non-sexual sense. They'll kiss air, cheek-to-cheek, a la French General awarding a medal).

One of the reasons that I left Egypt (for Canada) is that I felt like a misfit there. (Not better, but I just didn't feel comfortable all around......)

Now, we all know that hugs can be manly and macho and don't really mean anything. Even Clint Eastwood, John Wayne and Rock (no, sorry) and Anthony Quinn used to hug other cowboys (although not on Mountains but in the Plains.)

Slowswim
September 14th, 2007, 01:25 PM
Couldn't agree more. Wear what you want. As long as someone's not picking it out for you.


Huh.:confused:

I'm never allowed out of the house without prior spousal approval of the clothes I picked out.:sad:

</IMG></IMG>

CreamPuff
September 14th, 2007, 02:02 PM
Huh.:confused:

I'm never allowed out of the house without prior spousal approval of the clothes I picked out.:sad:

</IMG></IMG>

Too funny!! I NEVER tell my husband what to wear. Ever. I'm not a very good wife. 'Course hubby also has long hair that he wears in a ponytail and I still shop in the juniors section. We refuse to grow up. I think it has something to do with not having kids. :doh:

Allen Stark
September 14th, 2007, 06:47 PM
My wife never tells me what to wear,she just buys the clothes and if I match things wrongly she gives me THE LOOK.No words are necessary.

Slowswim
September 15th, 2007, 09:21 AM
My wife never tells me what to wear,she just buys the clothes and if I match things wrongly she gives me THE LOOK.No words are necessary.

Yep, and when she doesn't like something of mine...it suddenly disappears. Must have gotten thrown out by accident or something?:dunno:

runner girl
September 17th, 2007, 08:16 PM
Sun Precautions sells a similar outfit (although a shorter top) for those folks that want to play in the water but can't handle the sun. Kind of interesting to have the same basic idea for totally different fundamental reasons. Although, I guess they aren't different - both are based on limiting one's exposure.

http://www.sunprecautions.com/shop_all.asp?CAT=wr&SUBCAT=0w

goundy
November 29th, 2014, 12:23 AM
Hi. I understand it's very difficult to find places that sell Islamic swimsuits. It took me ages to find one for my daughter so if anyone's looking you can get them here.

This one is for kids:
http://neatstacks.com/?product=childs-spandex-polyester-islamicmuslim-swimwear

This one is for woman
http://neatstacks.com/?product=womens-modest-spandex-2-pcs-style-muslim-swimsuits-islamic-swimwearmuslim

DeniseMW
December 4th, 2014, 05:26 PM
I find this thread really interesting, because several weeks ago a group of girls from what must have been an Islamic school came to swim at the rec center. All but one or two were covered head to toe, but they were just splashing around and not doing laps. I thought how hard it would be to actually swim with all that clothing, and whether overheating would be an issue.

FindingMyInnerFish
December 5th, 2014, 06:18 AM
What people CHOOSE to wear swimming is one thing; when women must fear arrest, torture, even being killed for wearing something other women wear freely, another story altogether. Personally, I'm grateful to have been raised in a religious tradition that didn't require the kind of coverage these suits provide, and to be born in an era when we weren't confined to suits like these: http://www.victoriana.com/library/Beach/FashionableBathingSuits.htm Long open water swims would have been somewhat awkward....

DeniseMW
December 5th, 2014, 03:08 PM
FindingMyInnerFish, I was thinking the same thing - what awful swimsuits women had to wear back then. And men wore long suits made of wool. Can you even imagine what that must have felt like wet? I'm pretty certai that women didn't do laps in those getups. It probably wasn't considered ladylike to do much more than dip in a toe or splash around on the edge of the pond.

I try not to judge how people dress at the pool because there are a lot of factors that go into their choices. As long as they don't clog the drains. Or get their hair drifting in my face. Personally, I'm glad to be able to wear whatever I want. That much clothing would bug me.

Except the one guy who showed up at the rec center wearing a thong bathing suit. He was middle aged, bald, and had a big gut, and the image of his cheeks bobbing in the water haunt me still.