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smontanaro
September 13th, 2007, 11:24 AM
I read a fair amount. I'm always on the lookout for something new.
So, what are your reading?

My current project is the Anthology of American Literature.
The version I have is a two-volume set from 1974 I found garbage
picking (yes, I admit it - I live near Northwestern University and we
have alleys - amazing the junk you can find from time-to-time). I
figure it will take me six months to a year to plow through both
volumes. While to some degree this is the Reader's Digest of American
literature, I figure it will give me a good overview of the full arc
of the topic and provide me with some further directions for future
reading. I just started Benjamin Franklin's autobiography.

The first couple hundred pages were a bit tedious at times because it
was all early Colonial stuff. Lots of hellfire and brimstone from the
Puritans.

Skip Montanaro

Leonard Jansen
September 13th, 2007, 12:01 PM
I, too, am a voracious reader. Faves are anything factual, sci-fi, horror and science.

The Big Bam (Leigh Montville) - A biography of Babe Ruth. It's OK, but not great. I did find one very interesting fact, however. It turns out that Ruth copied his swing from a priest who liked to hit baseballs with a fungo bat. A fungo bat requires you to swing upward as opposed to level, and level swings were the style in baseball at that time. The upward swing combined with Ruth's obvious power made the balls fly further. OK, at least *I* thought that was fascinating...

Lies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them (Al Franken) - Warms my extremely liberal heart.

Speaking of Al Franken, his book, "Why Not Me?" - About a fictional run for president by him, is very funny. His platform is the elimination of ATM fees.

-LBJ

Seagurl51
September 13th, 2007, 12:20 PM
I don't read, it rots the brain. TV is a much better alternative. ;)

I'm reading "The Amber Spyglass." The third book in the His Dark Materials triology by Phillip Pullman. They're making the first book, "The Golden Compass," into a movie [with Daniel Craig :kiss1:]. I'm also working on finishing "Death by Black Hole: And other Cosmic Quandries" by Neil DeGrass Tyson.

And I have to give props to Harry Potter!!!

ViveBene
September 13th, 2007, 12:21 PM
smontaro:

Did you read Jonathan Edwards' sermon on the hellfires over which we, like spiders, are depended by an unseen hand?

Lewis and Clark's journals, usually read in a redacted form, are quite engaging and a staple of Americana. IIRC, a tiny number on the expedition did know how to swim -- useful if your travels take you up the Mississippi, up the Missouri, and out the Snake (or Columbia; I forget at the moment).

Having divided interests -- swim low, climb high -- I'm waiting for Yvon Chouinard's Climbing Ice to arrive from Amazon, the Sears, Roebuck of the 21st century.

Regards,
VB

The Fortress
September 13th, 2007, 12:24 PM
I, too, am a voracious reader. Faves are anything factual, sci-fi, horror and science.

-LBJ

Me too. But no sci-fi, horror or science. I do fiction, historical fiction, biography, some suspense.

Recently read:

Augustus by Anthony Everitt
all of Phillippa Gregory's tudor era historical fictions novels (populist viewpoint) at the beach
Dick Beardsley: Staying the Course: A Runner's Toughest Race
A Fatal Grace by Louise Penny

Oh, yes, I did read Harry Potter twice. I was happy that I proved Kyra and her other special K wrong by correctly predicting that Snape was good. :thhbbb:

scyfreestyler
September 13th, 2007, 12:40 PM
Reagan Diaries currently. Saw it at Costco and could not resist.

smontanaro
September 13th, 2007, 12:43 PM
Lies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them (Al Franken) - Warms my extremely liberal heart.

Speaking of Al Franken, his book, "Why Not Me?" - About a fictional run for president by him, is very funny. His platform is the elimination of ATM fees.

"Liars" was excellent. "Why Not Me?" has been sitting on my nightstand for about a year. I'll get to it one of these days.

Skip

smontanaro
September 13th, 2007, 12:47 PM
Did you read Jonathan Edwards' sermon on the hellfires over which we, like spiders, are depended by an unseen hand?

Yes, real Old Testament stuff there. Glad I wasn't around in those times. We always think of the Puritans as escaping religious persecution. They were "Not Too Friendly" (tm) to dissenting religious views themselves though.

Then last night while I was on the 'puter my wife was playing Julia Sweeney's "Letting Go of God". ;)

Skip

Peter Cruise
September 13th, 2007, 02:28 PM
Years ago, when I first opened my now-defunct bookstore, I stumbled across Patrick O'Brian's wonderful historical fiction series. At that time there was eleven or so and I loved it extremely, handselling the dickens out of it. As more books came out I put them aside without reading them, promising myself that when the series finally finished, I would conduct a grand re-read and then savour the new ones. Well, O'Brian continued on into his eighties (handwriting then typing his manuscripts) and then died having written three chapters of a new book. At that time I was deep in the depressive gloom of a dream gone awry and then the joys of finding a new job at age 54. At long last, this past month and a half, I've felt like I could approach the series with the appreciation I felt that it deserved. What can I say? It brought me renewed joy in the deceptively simple art of storytelling and swept me up into what I consider a towering achievement of literature.

Blackbeard's Peg
September 13th, 2007, 02:42 PM
Only read one book in the last, oh, probably 15 years, that wasn't school-related (and even those, I put up a fight).

I read the USMS forums, SI's, Swimming World, USMS Swimmer photo captions and memos at work. Occasionally will read through CD liner notes.

I do read music too :violin:

3strokes
September 13th, 2007, 03:48 PM
I live in an apartment building and there are some tenants who occasionally will leave their old books on a shelf by the entrance to the underground garage so I'll read mostly a variety of kinds of books (except for the Romances where Fabio lookalikes are on the cover clasping buxom nymphs to their muscular chests). I'll return these. However I have kept 99% of all books I've ever bought.
When I emigrated to Canada in 1989, I left behind some 2000+ books (including all works of Louis L'Amour, C.S. Forester, Edgar Rice Burroughs (only the Tarzans), John D. McDonald, Arthur Conan Doyle, Agatha Christie, etc.....

I've now rebought the P.G. Wodehouse (of Jeeves fame) and C.S. Forester (creator of Horatio Hornblower) series and the Allen Drury "Advise and Consent" series and am building my Dave Barry. I've managed to get sent (one book at a time) my Spanish Alvaro de Laiglesia humour books.

I'm forever reading "Don Quijote de la Mancha" but right now, right now -apart from reading these posts- I'll be continuing to read one of those Westerns a la Zane Grey (with a woman gunfighter who outslings the slickest gunslingers in the West on the Cimarron trail.); not a page turner (but it was free.)

tjburk
September 13th, 2007, 05:02 PM
Stephen King, Louis L'Amour, C.S. Lewis, Patrick Robinson, Ken Follett, Ian Fleming, Dean Koontz, Winston Churchills' WWII Series that started with The Gathering Storm, Tom Clancy (though he is a little wordy sometimes).

Specific other books I remember:

Hanta Yo, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, I Will Fight No More Forever.

I like to read just about anything......if it catches my eye.....

Got Boost
September 13th, 2007, 06:52 PM
Right now, USMS Forums..
Rightnow I am working through the new Sport compact Car, and Cardinal of the Kremlin. Love Tom Clancy
Got Boost

knelson
September 13th, 2007, 08:19 PM
I stumbled across Patrick O'Brian's wonderful historical fiction series. At that time there was eleven or so and I loved it extremely

Ditto. Of course I didn't start reading them until within the past couple years so I was able to read them all consecutively. I may have snuck another book or two in there somewhere, but for the most part I just read the twenty volumes one after the other. Definitely one of the highlights of my reading life.

Currently I've started Shelby Foote's The Civil War: A Narrative. It might take a while to plow through the three tomes that make up the series. I took a slight detour--since I had a flight to Chicago last weekend and didn't want to lug a huge book onto the plane--and started Memories of the Ford Administration by John Updike and I'm really enjoying it.

ViveBene
September 13th, 2007, 09:41 PM
Another wee giftie for self from the endless treasure chest that is Amazon: James Villepigue and Hugo Rivera's The Body Sculpting Bible for Women (2001 edition, and they also wrote one for men). Before I trudge off to push, pull, jerk, and shimmy, does anyone have experience using this book?

Thanks,
VB

blainesapprentice
September 13th, 2007, 10:25 PM
I actually really do like to read--but never have the time or energy to do so during the school semesters--this summer I read 35 books--from May 19th-August 19th...I felt that was enough to hold me over until Christmas break.

I read a lot of girly books--fast easy reads--lets see what I can remember that I read this summer--titles no authors as I don't have the books with me here at school:

Shopaholic and Baby (of course!)
Princess Academy
Hurt Go Happy
Frog Princess
Running with Scissors
Lovely Bones
Alphabet Weekends--Elizabeth Noble--Gentlemen read the girly book, take the concept--apply it--soooo cute.
The Friendship Test-Elizabeth Noble as well actually
Harry Potter I
Harry Potter II
Harry Potter III
Harry Potter IV
Harry Potter V
Harry Potter VI
Harry Potter VII <--had never read any of the potter books before--read them straight through which I think was the best way to do it possible.
I did then (But I wouldn't now)
Each Little Bird that Sings


well i can't remember any more--when i go home this weekend--if im bored enough I'll finish the list--the books are all in a pile in my room
haha

Redbird Alum
September 18th, 2007, 05:08 PM
I read just about anything....

Currently: WICKED

Rich Abrahams
September 18th, 2007, 08:56 PM
Kirk and Peter,
I'm with you re Patrick O'Brian. I'm still having withdrawal pains and I finished the series six months ago. Today on NPR (Talk of the Nation) there was an interview with David Cordingly who recently wrote Cochrane, The Real Master and Commander. Go to the website and check it out. It's amazing how closely O'Brian based Aubrey on Cochrane.

I've read about a dozen novels since then. Ones I can recomend are Cloud Atlas and Black Swan Green by David Mitchell and a collection of short stories by Micheal Chabon called Werewolves In Their Youths. I actually enjoyed this more than all his novels, which I also read recently.

Kirk, I'm also a big Updike fan. On the light side, try his book of short stories called Licks of Love.

3strokes
September 18th, 2007, 09:13 PM
Kirk and Peter,
I'm with you re Patrick O'Brian. I'm still having withdrawal pains and I finished the series six months ago.


To all those who publicly admitted to liking/loving/adoring Patrick O'Brian:
Try to get your hands on the C.S. Forester "Horatio Hornblower" books. You can read them in any order and then will want want to reread them in (Hornblower's) chronological sequence. Forester's cannons (from Sloops to Frigates to Ships 'o the Line) will blow O'Brian's out-of-the-water (with all respect due) with one broadside.

Here they are (not in publishing order but as Horatio ages):

Mr. Midhsipman Hornblower
Lieutenant Hornblower
Hornblower and the Hotspur
Hornblower and the Atropos
The Happy Return (upon which the movie with Gregory Peck was based).
A Ship of the Line
Flying Colours
The Commodore
Lord Hornblower
Hornblower in the West Indies.
Penguin has published all these in an Omnibus, three volume series. (Found on amazon). I'm not pushing Penguin or Amazon (nor am I -ever- selling my series) but it's were they're (or were) easiest to find and get.

Peter Cruise
September 19th, 2007, 01:42 AM
Ahmed- with all due respect- I have read his books and enjoyed them, but they are to O'Brians works as Mickey Spillane's are to Charles Dickens.

geochuck
September 19th, 2007, 02:29 AM
One thing I know is that Peter knows books.

Slowswim
September 19th, 2007, 09:53 AM
Not currently reading anything non-work related, but I grew up reading Louis L'Amour, Ian Fleming, Afetr college it was Clive Clusler and John D. Mc Donald (Travis Magee series), but most recently was Bias by Bernard Goldberg and Slander by Ann Coulter.

ensignada
September 19th, 2007, 12:43 PM
I'm reading the Narnia Chronicles aloud to my daughter and am working my way through some old Newberry favorites. Most recent was "The Witch of Blackbird Pond," a great read for girls 10+.

I also just reread Ben Hamper's "Rivethead," a book both hilarious and sobering about the author's experiences working on the line at a GM plant.

SwimStud
September 19th, 2007, 01:33 PM
I'm reading "The Awakening" by Kate Chopin.

3strokes
September 19th, 2007, 02:13 PM
Ahmed- with all due respect- I have read his books and enjoyed them, but they are to O'Brians works as Mickey Spillane's are to Charles Dickens.

Hi, Peter

"due respect" noted and acknowledged and returned in triplicate.:hug:
However I'll stand by my guns (as to preference. I did read and like the O'Brian series). It is a matter of personal taste after all.
For instance, Dave Barry is not P.G. Wodehouse, but either author will have me suddenly cause the people surrounding me reaching for their cell-phones to call the men in white to come and grab me for a very close fitting straightjacket, when I laugh out loud (in public) and on a re-read. And yet each has his fans who can't stand the other.

But I shall not lower my colours; I will give your author a 21-gun salute (because you hold the key to the grog and you used to be a cop with -probably- access to guns).

tjburk
September 19th, 2007, 02:35 PM
Of course....if you really want Classic reading......

The whole Mack Bolan series was awesome!!!!!!:bow:

Leonard Jansen
September 19th, 2007, 03:01 PM
For instance, Dave Barry is not P.G. Wodehouse, but either author will have me suddenly cause the people surrounding me reaching for their cell-phones to call the men in white to come and grab me for a very close fitting straightjacket, when I laugh out loud (in public) and on a re-read.

Ahmed -

If you want to read an utterly hilarious 2 book set, get "Riotous Assembly" and the follow-up, "Indecent Exposure", by Tom Sharpe. True story: I loaned my copy of "Riotous Assembly" to a friend and he was laughing so hard, he fell out of bed and broke his wrist. When his wife took him to the ER, he insisted on bringing the book so he could keep reading while waiting. Also, if you've not read it, "A Confederacy of Dunces" is a delight.

-LBJ

knelson
September 19th, 2007, 03:31 PM
On the topic of funny books I really liked "Lucky Jim" by Kingsley Amis. Also "Catch-22" is pretty hard to top for sheer lunacy.

Peter Cruise
September 19th, 2007, 04:56 PM
I believe 'Catch 22' was the model for the formation of FINA.

Gdavis
September 19th, 2007, 05:26 PM
I read a lot of thrillerish stuff (Forsyth, Crais (my fave), de mille, Flynn, Baldaccis etc.) recently added Brian Haig, Lee Child - all good fun provided you don't mind a bit of violence. Occasionally branch out into other areas - e few I have enjoyed: Shantaram (I'm in the middle of it now, I'm not sure where it's going but I'm enjoying the journey for the moment.) Moneyball - fascinating book from a sharp writer. The Punch - by masters swimmer John Feinstein. All worth reading for very different reasons. My all time favourite book is Dune.:wave:

Allen Stark
September 25th, 2007, 07:59 PM
I just finished " The Life of Pi" which was great.I am just starting on "Making Money" by Terry Pratchett.I love his books. I also love the "Cartoon History of___" series. The latest is "The Cartoon History of the Modern Age Vol. I" I am a history buff and they contain many facts I had never heard of.

ViveBene
September 26th, 2007, 02:49 AM
Moneyball - fascinating book from a sharp writer.

An earlier book from Michael Lewis is "Liars' Poker," a hilarious look at Wall Street's bond kings, and published when some of them were undergoing very public scrutiny.

NH, hmm. Looking forward to a dip in Sawyer Pond or the Saco or the Pemi, East Branch.

Regards,
VB

ensignada
September 26th, 2007, 11:37 AM
Ahmed -

If you want to read an utterly hilarious 2 book set, get "Riotous Assembly" and the follow-up, "Indecent Exposure", by Tom Sharpe. True story: I loaned my copy of "Riotous Assembly" to a friend and he was laughing so hard, he fell out of bed and broke his wrist. When his wife took him to the ER, he insisted on bringing the book so he could keep reading while waiting. Also, if you've not read it, "A Confederacy of Dunces" is a delight.

-LBJ

My sister-in-law judges compatability by whether or not a person enjoys "Dunces".

RecreationalSwimmer
September 26th, 2007, 03:47 PM
http://www.iub.edu/%7Eintell/dweck_interview.shtml

I'm reading Carol Dweck's "Mindset - The New Psychology of Success". It puts things in a new perspective. Highly contagious and uplifting.

knelson
September 26th, 2007, 04:00 PM
My sister-in-law judges compatability by whether or not a person enjoys "Dunces".

I'd judge sense of humor on whether someone enjoyed it. If you didn't think it was funny, you just don't have a sense of humor. Period.

The Fortress
September 26th, 2007, 04:20 PM
My sister-in-law judges compatability by whether or not a person enjoys "Dunces".

Oh yeah, that's on my bookshelf, along with the O'Brian.

geochuck
September 26th, 2007, 04:39 PM
I hate to read books. I like to listen to Chuckie as she reads her books outloud while we are driving.

My son in law is blind and he listens to recorded books.

Leonard Jansen
September 26th, 2007, 04:39 PM
I'd judge sense of humor on whether someone enjoyed it. If you didn't think it was funny, you just don't have a sense of humor. Period.
Amen.

Also, the great Hunter S. Thompson's "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas" is in that category, too.

-LBJ

aquageek
September 26th, 2007, 05:48 PM
Atlas Shrugged, again.

newmastersswimmer
September 29th, 2007, 02:43 PM
The book I am currently reading is called "The Road to Reality....A Complete Guide to The Laws of The Universe" by Roger Penrose. I admit that I have been reading it off and on for over a year now though LOL! It is a long book though (over a 1000 pages). I also recently read a Brian Greene book before I started the Penrose book titled "The Fabric of The Universe....Space, Time, and The Texture of Reality". I also really enjoyed the "Elegant Universe" by Brian Greene as well. There was also a PBS special on The Elegant Universe too...(It was an excellent 3 part NOVA series in fact). Anyway, you can view the individual clips of that great Nova special from the PBS website. (See the link below if you are remotely interested....When you get to the website look at the link in the upper right column to watch the program):

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/elegant/

shark
October 9th, 2007, 10:49 AM
I just finished "Into the Wild" by Jon Krakauer. I had read his original article in Outside Magazine back in 1993 but had never read the book, published in 1996. I would suggest reading it before you see the movie. By the way, has anyone seen the movie? It is getting incredible reviews. Produced and directed by Sean Penn.

Swimmer Bill
October 9th, 2007, 02:51 PM
I'm reading two books at the moment:

Contested Waters, A Social History of Swimming Pools in America by Jeff Wiltse

and

Swimmers, Courage & Triumph by Larry Thompson

Both books are available as membership benefits through the International Swimming Hall of Fame (www.ishof.org). Larry Thompson's book is available as part of the Basic Membership ($35), and Wiltse's book is available as part of the Contributor Membership ($100), which also includes a copy of Thompson's book. I wanted both books and wanted to support ISHOF, so I joined as a Contributor.

Although I'm biased about Larry Thompson's book (because I contributed to it), Natalie Coughlin, George Brunstad, and Terry Laughlin were all fascinating subjects. It was an honor to write about them, and I hope people enjoy reading their stories. Wiltse's book is a brilliant glimpse into the role of the municipal swimming pool in the United States. IMHO, both books are must-reads for anyone who loves swimming.

ensignada
October 10th, 2007, 11:05 AM
I just finished reading "Eragon". I love science fiction/fantasy and am lukewarm about this book. For a 17 year old writer, it wasn't a bad plot at all, but terribly derivative of LOTR and the Star Wars sagas. I kept expecting to see footnotes or an acknowledgement to Tolkien or Lucas. I've heard the next book is better.

imspoiled
October 12th, 2007, 02:41 PM
Barb-
Second book IS much better. I agree with the opinion that the first story is similar to LOTR. He does more to develop in the second, but it's still Tolkein-esque.

Dana

SwimStud
October 12th, 2007, 02:53 PM
Barb-
Second book IS much better. I agree with the opinion that the first story is similar to LOTR. He does more to develop in the second, but it's still Tolkein-esque.

Dana

OK calm down you two...

Tolkien wasn't at all influenced by Beowolf, Nordic Lore in general, Celtic lore in general, Greek mythology, etc etc...

Every story written is similar to another one. It's the commonality of the human experience...

Please...be grateful the kid wrote the book. I just bought the DVD last night for $10 at Target!

imspoiled
October 12th, 2007, 03:15 PM
Yeah, but I heard the movie was a total disappointment for fans of the book. How can one take a 500+ page book and condense it down to a 90 minute movie?

I have the same problem with the Haryy Potter movies. After reading the books, the movies are just lacking in depth.

SwimStud
October 12th, 2007, 03:47 PM
Yeah, but I heard the movie was a total disappointment for fans of the book. How can one take a 500+ page book and condense it down to a 90 minute movie?

I have the same problem with the Haryy Potter movies. After reading the books, the movies are just lacking in depth.

Anything with magic and explosions is not likely to have depth when it gets to the screen...taint Shakespeare

TomBrooklyn
October 16th, 2007, 03:00 PM
MONEYBALL, by the author of Liars Poker. I read Liar's Poker around the time it came out too.

ViveBene
July 20th, 2008, 09:47 PM
I inhaled Dover Solo (Thanks, Marcia Cleveland! :applaud: ) and wrapped up Swimming to Antarctica over the weekend. (The first page I opened to in Dover Solo was a map of Orr and Bailey Islands, places I have come to know and enjoy. Maine ocean water is brrr!)

Has anyone read Wind, Waves and Sunburn? Apparently the stories stop in the 70's. I'd like to read more recent accounts of feats of valor.

Has anyone read Penny Lee Dean's book on OW swimming?

Any other suggestions to feed my fix? I read Hands of the Black Masseuse when it first came out.

Thanks, VB

craiglll@yahoo.com
July 20th, 2008, 10:03 PM
I am reading Elisee Reclus, Universal Geography. The volume about the west African islands is great, especially when he writes about Ste. Helena Island. He was kicked out of France because he protested Napoleon's crowning. It really amazes me that I had never heard of him. Also how writers during the late 1800s took something that most people saw as either being irrational or unimportant and showing how important it is to human development. If any one wants to read any natural history, human culture, and late 1800 history, this is these are the greatest books.

geochuck
July 20th, 2008, 10:08 PM
I was swimming in a lot of those races that Conrad wrote about. He is still around Chicago, if he has not passed on.

I have tried to reach him over the years but have not been able to. I would really like to talk to him again.


I am reading Elisee Reclus, Universal Geography. The volume about the west African islands is great, especially when he writes about Ste. Helena Island. He was kicked out of France because he protested Napoleon's crowning. It really amazes me that I had never heard of him. Also how writers during the late 1800s took something that most people saw as either being irrational or unimportant and showing how important it is to human development. If any one wants to read any natural history, human culture, and late 1800 history, this is these are the greatest books.

smontanaro
July 20th, 2008, 10:19 PM
I recently finished "Beautiful Boy" by David Sheff, an absorbing but painful memoir about the author's journey through his son's addiction. I highly recommend this book.

I am now back to (slowly) working my way through the 1974 edition of "Anthology of American Literature." I've just begun "Walden", which is near the end of Volume 1 (two-volume set).

Skip

ViveBene
July 20th, 2008, 11:13 PM
Sending you a PM!
VB


I was swimming in a lot of those races that Conrad wrote about. He is still around Chicago, if he has not passed on.

I have tried to reach him over the years but have not been able to. I would really like to talk to him again.

geochuck
July 21st, 2008, 12:37 AM
Thank you so much, I just got off the phone talking with Conrad for over an hour. Conrad's book Wind Waves & Sunburn. We were remembering some of the things that we had done during the swims. He said he remembered the first time he met me. He said I was pretty thin in those days. Our first meeting was in Chicoutomi Quebec. I had had a car accident that year and was not able to train. It was my man tan race. I had to let everyone know I was in great shape so I dieted and looked very fit. I put man tan on my face to show my goggle marks, and on my back to let everyone think I had been training out in the open water.
Sending you a PM!
VB

Leonard Jansen
July 21st, 2008, 09:16 AM
Currently working on:
The New Physics for the Twenty-First Century, Gordon Fraser, Ed.

A review of what is known about the current state of the various areas of physics (cosmology, gravitation, string theory, etc). Great stuff.

Total trash reading:
The Touch of Twilight (Sign of the Zodiac, Book 3) by Vicki Pettersson

-LBJ

ViveBene
July 21st, 2008, 10:04 AM
Before my postie disappears, I'm still looking for entertaining reading on OW.

Thanks.


I inhaled Dover Solo (Thanks, Marcia Cleveland! :applaud: ) and wrapped up Swimming to Antarctica over the weekend. (The first page I opened to in Dover Solo was a map of Orr and Bailey Islands, places I have come to know and enjoy. Maine ocean water is brrr!)

Has anyone read Wind, Waves and Sunburn? Apparently the stories stop in the 70's. I'd like to read more recent accounts of feats of valor.

Has anyone read Penny Lee Dean's book on OW swimming?

Any other suggestions to feed my fix? I read Hands of the Black Masseuse when it first came out.

Thanks, VB

gull
July 21st, 2008, 10:11 AM
Recently finished The Art of Racing in the Rain. The story is told from the perspective of a dog. Excellent book.

knelson
July 21st, 2008, 10:40 AM
I finished Shelby Foote's three volume, 3,000 page The Civil War: A Narrative last week so I finally had a chance to start Off the Deep End by Hodding Carter. It's an entertaining and very quick read. I think it should be required reading for all masters swimmers. There's another thread about it here. (http://forums.usms.org/showthread.php?t=10780)

SwimStud
July 21st, 2008, 01:07 PM
Oliver Twist.

aquageek
July 21st, 2008, 01:18 PM
Strong Fathers, Strong Daughters by Meg Meeker

anita
July 22nd, 2008, 12:28 AM
Finishing World Without End by Ken Follet and will start on The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay by Michael Chabon.

Also inserted in there is one of Jim Butcher's Dresden Files...

craiglll@yahoo.com
July 22nd, 2008, 03:23 AM
I just bought Stuffed and Starved (or maybe the other way around). It is in my backpack. I am going to start reading it in a few minutes. It is by Rav Patel. He was on the CSPAN book interview. it sounds really interesting. It is about why we produce more food now than ever in the history of mankind, yet people are starving to death and other issues concerning food and our world. from what I understand it is the outgrowth of his Ph d. He also asks why we should use corn and soy beans to produce energy when we have other ways to produce energy but not many other ways to produce food. Is it more important to have gas in the first world than to have food in the third world. Also the State obsession with eating huge amounts of food that is bad for us and how that is now becoming a status symbol in 2nd & 3rd world countries. (India has one of the highest rates of Diabetes (sp) per capita int he world.

craiglll@yahoo.com
July 22nd, 2008, 03:32 AM
I just finished "Into the Wild" by Jon Krakauer. I had read his original article in Outside Magazine back in 1993 but had never read the book, published in 1996. I would suggest reading it before you see the movie. By the way, has anyone seen the movie? It is getting incredible reviews. Produced and directed by Sean Penn.

It is a great book. I think it is amazing that so few people read it. the fact that self-actualization can lead to destruction is so mind opening. About 2 days after I read the book originally, my best friend from childhood called me and said it reminded him of me. :( I couldn't go to the movie.

I heard a long time ago that Sean Penn originally wanted to play the guy a long time ago but couldn't get it funded.

blainesapprentice
July 24th, 2008, 01:30 PM
I'm currently reading Stephanie Myer's Twilight Saga...I'm finishing up the third book (Twilight-New Moon-Eclipse) in anticipation of the 4th one that is being released on August 2nd (Breaking Dawn). They are phenomenal books if your into that sorta thing--more girl oriented I suppose and more early 20s, late teens....but very good...they've been compared to the Harry Potter series.

knelson
July 24th, 2008, 01:38 PM
It is a great book. I think it is amazing that so few people read it.

Really? It seems like everyone I know has read it.

swimr4life
July 25th, 2008, 09:12 PM
I just finished reading The Last Lecture last week. It is an awesome book. VERY inspiring and a quick read. The author, Randy Pausch, died today. His book wil live on and be a living testimony of what a wonderful man he was!

Now I'm reading 2nd Chance by James Patterson.

anita
July 26th, 2008, 12:08 AM
I'm currently reading Stephanie Myer's Twilight Saga...I'm finishing up the third book (Twilight-New Moon-Eclipse) in anticipation of the 4th one that is being released on August 2nd (Breaking Dawn). They are phenomenal books if your into that sorta thing--more girl oriented I suppose and more early 20s, late teens....but very good...they've been compared to the Harry Potter series.

Upon the insistance of my 13 year old daughter, I have read them all. I'm sure I will have the 4th one thrust upon me as well. They were good, although I loved HP more. That said, it was interesting going into B&N and seeing ALL ages of women picking up the books--tweens through adults. LOVE seeing that.

JMiller
July 28th, 2008, 02:14 AM
These books changed my mind to one of reasonable plausibility.

"Blue Ocean"

"Non-Zero"

"The Holographic Universe"

ensignada
July 28th, 2008, 10:51 AM
I'm (re)reading Newbery winners before recommending them to my 8 yr old:

A Wrinkle in Time, by Madeline L'Engle. A wonderful story for grown-ups too.

From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler, by E.L. Konigsburg. Still a fun story.

Bridge to Terabithia, by Katherine Patterson. Too much for an 8 yr old - I was sobbing through the end.

The Tale of Despereaux, by Kate DiCamillo (currently reading)

3strokes
July 28th, 2008, 03:01 PM
Years ago, when I first opened my now-defunct bookstore, I stumbled across Patrick O'Brian's wonderful historical fiction series.

Peter, Peter, Peter. The "Master" ...................is...................Cecil Louis Troughton Smith








a.k.a.







???

mctrusty
July 28th, 2008, 05:47 PM
I just started in on the History of Western Philosophy by Bertrand Russell.

ViveBene
July 28th, 2008, 09:10 PM
Baseball books! Roger Angell's compilations: The Summer Game, Five Seasons, and his latest, Game Time.


Reminds me of the time I "started" Nietzsche -- about ten times over.


I just started in on the History of Western Philosophy by Bertrand Russell.

geochuck
July 28th, 2008, 09:14 PM
The Best of America's Test Kitchen 2009.

Leonard Jansen
July 29th, 2008, 10:08 AM
Baseball books! Roger Angell's compilations: The Summer Game, Five Seasons, and his latest, Game Time.


A woman who is into baseball (and OW swimming)? Now that is the definition of "hot."

Did you read "Moneyball"? I love all the math aspects of the game and that was fun for that reason. I can read the Bill James-type stuff until my eyes explode.

-LBJ

ViveBene
July 29th, 2008, 10:16 AM
BLUSH! Goodness, I don't think I've ever been called hot! :)

Roger Angell is a marvelous writer; I read some of his articles in the New Yorker 30 years ago and can instantly detect his style. Also, I remembered, across the years, his description of Gibson's pitching!

I did read Michael Lewis's Moneyball. That was pretty good! I also read his Liar's Poker before that (bond kings on Wall Street).

Er... I play bluegrass banjo. Did my hotness quotient just explode? :laugh2:


A woman who is into baseball (and OW swimming)? Now that is the definition of "hot."

Did you read "Moneyball"? I love all the math aspects of the game and that was fun for that reason. I can read the Bill James-type stuff until my eyes explode.

-LBJ

3strokes
July 29th, 2008, 11:30 AM
Er... I play bluegrass banjo. Did my hotness quotient just explode? :laugh2:

I -somehow (the screen name?)- always associated you with a mandolin.......... (and Dean Martin and Perry Como).

smontanaro
July 29th, 2008, 12:04 PM
BLUSH! Er... I play bluegrass banjo. Did my hotness quotient just explode? :laugh2:

Yes! My Pandora acoustic playlist is loaded with bluegrass... :)

Skip

Big Jim the finger
July 30th, 2008, 02:06 AM
After I get done with the assembly instructions for this muffler bearing, I'm going to read the fine print on a car lease commercial. Keeps the eyes moving real fast.

Leonard Jansen
July 30th, 2008, 07:46 AM
Er... I play bluegrass banjo. Did my hotness quotient just explode? :laugh2:

Yes, it got raised even further with that. However, if you had said "bluegrass bagpipes" you would have lost ALL hotness points and probably even have gone negative.

Just say "NO" (to bagpipes).

-LBJ

mctrusty
July 30th, 2008, 12:39 PM
Reminds me of the time I "started" Nietzsche -- about ten times over.

I've also "started" Nietzsche, Kant, and Kierkegaard at various points and put them right back down again several times :). Russell's writing is a lot more pleasant to read.

William James is also very readable...

mctrusty
July 30th, 2008, 12:45 PM
Er... I play bluegrass banjo. Did my hotness quotient just explode? :laugh2:

Heck yes :).

I play the upright bass with some bluegrassers I know from work. I also play in a jazz trio.

ViveBene
July 30th, 2008, 01:22 PM
It gets better: After my little bluegrass band disbanded, I joined the Women's Association of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and wore my pearls to morning tea and contributed to the Annual Fund.
:shakeshead:
Actually, it wasn't a bad experience. The civic institutions helped shape the growing city, and behind the institutions were often influential families: the McCormacks and the Fields, e.g. The Women's Association as a historical phenomenon is quite interesting for that reason. Most orchestras have gone over to a Volunteer Association. :blah:

Corelli's Mandolin was quite good!


I -somehow (the screen name?)- always associated you with a mandolin.......... (and Dean Martin and Perry Como).

USMSarah
July 30th, 2008, 02:56 PM
I wish I had some time to read a good book... but right now I'm limited to short, quick reads like in Readers Digest. Has anyone read the most recent one? There is this story about a man who lost 4 of his family members in an awful situation (don't want to give anything away). I was in tears the entire time.

chefster
August 23rd, 2008, 10:26 AM
Y a, I just finished up a book last December ,The Path To Magic...it is a book on the kitchen and cooking . Looking for a third party to read it. It is a rough manuscript under 100 pages..I have been sending it out to publishers. Looking for a hard core reader that will give me some feedback.I will send out a copy.
It is different.

ViveBene
August 23rd, 2008, 12:08 PM
An agent?

knelson
August 23rd, 2008, 02:31 PM
I'm reading The Glorious Cause by Jeff Shaara. It's a historical novel about the American Revolution. Great read so far. It makes me realize I didn't really know that much about this chapter in American history.

LonghornbackinTX
August 23rd, 2008, 08:10 PM
I was reading The Smartest Guys in the Room. I have not had a lot of time to read lately. :(

ViveBene
September 13th, 2008, 11:54 AM
Your Brain on Cubs: Inside the Heads of Players and Fans

Has anyone read this book? It's about sports more generally (taking Cubs as the major study case) and things that happen neurologically from position of participant, coach, or fan.

Thanks.

VB

alphadog
September 19th, 2008, 05:41 PM
Recently (for fun):

Michael Crichton:
Prey
State of Fear

Bernard Cornwell:
The Last Kingdom

LaHaye/Jenkins:
Left Behind

Currently (for work):

Kempner & Tregoe:
The New Rational Manager

Rob Copeland
September 19th, 2008, 07:29 PM
I just finished Grayson by Lynn Cox, finally! A great read for any open water swimmer, written by a great open water swimmer.

mjtyson
September 19th, 2008, 09:36 PM
I have an "upstairs" book and a "downstairs" book. Upstairs I am reading Martin Caidin's Exit Earth, which I read last in 1990. Still good after all these years, although it includes the USSR, which is a little dead now (although Putin is trying his hardest to reincarnate it)

Downstairs I am reading The Mind of the Raven by Bernd Heinrich (a former record holder for the 100KM run btw). Very good book about these crazy birds. Well worth the read.

Next up I will be back on my Evelyn Waugh kick with his Sword of Honour trilogy. Good stuff.

ViveBene
September 20th, 2008, 10:45 PM
I just finished Grayson by Lynn Cox, finally! A great read for any open water swimmer, written by a great open water swimmer.

Grayson is a very nice book; I was pleasantly surprised. Difficult to explain to others, though.

Me: Well, it's about a baby whale that gets separated from its mom, and...
Other person: You mean, like Bambi of the sea?
Me: And Lynne Cox was in the water for, like, 12 hours...

That doesn't capture it, somehow!

Today I was prowling Children's Classics looking for a baby shower book and finding thrill after thrill: Babar, Owl and the Pussycat, Wind in the Willows, Grimms' Fairy Tales. A pleasure to read: vivid, madcap, complex language, utterly memorable.:bliss:

knelson
September 22nd, 2008, 01:25 AM
I started Cold Mountain last week. I've had it sitting around the house for the last decade and had myself convinced I wouldn't like it. Well, I have to say it's completely engrossing. I'm hooked.

ViveBene
September 22nd, 2008, 10:51 AM
And there is a very nice old-time/bluegrassy CD, Songs from the Mountain, featuring John Hermann, Dirk Powell, and Tim O'Brien, with selections "inspired by" the book.

Mary1912
September 28th, 2008, 01:47 PM
Your Brain on Cubs: Inside the Heads of Players and Fans

Has anyone read this book? It's about sports more generally (taking Cubs as the major study case) and things that happen neurologically from position of participant, coach, or fan.

Thanks.

VB

Ever read his father's book "The Killer Angels" about the Civil War? One of my favorite topics.

I just finished "Traveling Mercies" by Anne Lamott--one of my favorite books ever. I am now reading "The Ragamuffin Gospel" by Brennan Manning.

Mary1912
September 28th, 2008, 01:51 PM
I started Cold Mountain last week. I've had it sitting around the house for the last decade and had myself convinced I wouldn't like it. Well, I have to say it's completely engrossing. I'm hooked.

Great book. I love just about anything involving the Civil War.

mjgold
September 28th, 2008, 09:10 PM
I just read Phelps' Beneath the Surface. It was good in that it made me feel bad for not being in the pool 24/7. The last novel I read was Jane Eyre. Writing paper after paper and reading 200 pages a week for class makes it hard to read for pleasure.

knelson
September 30th, 2008, 01:29 AM
Great book. I love just about anything involving the Civil War.

I loved it. I stayed up way too late a couple nights last week because I couldn't put it down.

You asked about "The Killer Angels" earlier. Yeah, that's a good one. The movie Gettysburg, which is based on the book, is also worth watching.

Peter Cruise
September 30th, 2008, 01:56 AM
Have read both books about the Civil War, enjoyed them greatly; Cold Mountain is one of the greatest love stories ever (don't confuse it with the movie). However...if you want to read the Civil War, go no further than Shelby Foote's great narrative history trilogy of that sad event, you won't be sorry. Whoops, I'm supposed to be recommending wine rather than books now, aren't I? Okay, sip Montes vineyards Cabernet Sauvignon/ Carmenere blend with it, but do air it for 45 minutes.

knelson
September 30th, 2008, 02:34 AM
However...if you want to read the Civil War, go no further than Shelby Foote's great narrative history trilogy of that sad event, you won't be sorry.

Gee, Peter, you're a little late with this one:
http://forums.usms.org/showpost.php?p=142177&postcount=58
:)

I agree. It's terrific.

Mary1912
October 3rd, 2008, 01:43 PM
I loved it. I stayed up way too late a couple nights last week because I couldn't put it down.

You asked about "The Killer Angels" earlier. Yeah, that's a good one. The movie Gettysburg, which is based on the book, is also worth watching.

Yep I have Gettysburg...great film. ...and I loved Gods and Generals too (the movie).

Mary1912
October 3rd, 2008, 01:44 PM
Have read both books about the Civil War, enjoyed them greatly; Cold Mountain is one of the greatest love stories ever (don't confuse it with the movie). However...if you want to read the Civil War, go no further than Shelby Foote's great narrative history trilogy of that sad event, you won't be sorry. Whoops, I'm supposed to be recommending wine rather than books now, aren't I? Okay, sip Montes vineyards Cabernet Sauvignon/ Carmenere blend with it, but do air it for 45 minutes.

I looooooooove Shelby Foote. He's passed on I believe. But his voice..wow. He could read me the phone book and every ounce of stress would escape me.

mikedilv
October 3rd, 2008, 03:38 PM
Core Questions in Philosophy by Elliott Sober.

ViveBene
October 19th, 2008, 10:07 AM
Geert Mak's In Europe: Travels Through the Twentieth Century. In 1999 Mak, a Dutch journalist, spent a year traveling through Europe, looking at changes the century about to pass had wrought. He found many, and explored further, interviewing those who had survived long-distant events, reading newspapers of the day, quoting bits from letters written home from the trenches. He also takes a very large view re the emergence and dissolution of superpowers. (EU, he contends, is hindered in its attempts to become more unified, and so a major moral voice or economic power, because the EU constitution, unlike the visionary and unifying US Constitution, is a series of patched-together treaties.) 850 pages and I can't put it down. There is often a Dutch perspective in evidence, and Geert Mak's training as journalist means lively prose. He finds the telling detail, the person whose story embodies the fate of a village. He plants himself at gun posts or photographers' posts to look out upon the landscape they saw; he recreates the behaviors of young soldiers facing fire for the first time (two minutes later, they were all dead). The rise of cities, population movements, Karl Marx's lodgings in London, where he resided with wife, five children, and a maid in two rooms - it's all there. The picture of cities in latter half of nineteenth century, with one-third in London living in abject poverty, tens of thousands of children roving the streets homeless, and parish hegemony over the 40 different sewer systems, most dysfunctional in time of need, suggests the appeal of the equalizing values of the new forms of sociopolitical organization waiting in the wings.

On other front, M. Phelps's Beneath the Surface is now no. 7,861 in Amazon sales.... A few hours later and it's 6,456! Who is buying this book? Wholesalers, Walmart, book clubs?

24 hours later (Monday morning, 10-20-08) it's 4,119.

ViveBene
October 27th, 2008, 08:19 PM
Wild Swim: River, Lake, Lido, and Sea: The Best Places to Swim Outdoors in Britain.

By Kate Rew, the founder of the British Outdoor Swimming Association

This book will appear in paperback in U.S. in 2009. It's got rave reviews on the British Amazon site. A small number of the British publication are available in the U.S. - but I just bought the cheapest!

:)

(And I used the USMS Amazon portal - top page of USMS site, scroll down on right side to "Save up to 40% at Amazon," and click on it - so that USMS is rebated a tiny portion of the cost, at no extra cost to me!)

ViveBene
March 8th, 2009, 01:06 PM
Finally, I read Jon Krakauer's Into Thin Air yesterday, an account of the May 1996 season on Everest. It is engaging writing, and the events were horrific, from the humdrum insults hurled by Chongmolungma (a falling rock hit a Sherpa squarely in the skull, followed by another 5 minutes later as he was being assisted down) to the outright nast exhibited by various expedition members (one team refused to lend its radio to the dying leader of another group so he could summon assistance). Krakauer devotes about half the book to the fatal May 10 events, returning again and again to the summit in his writing and following the small bands of two or three as they made their way up or down the last couple of pitches, lost members, saw ghosts, ran out of O2, gave up, didn't give up. Climbing Everest is worse than anyone can imagine, but Krakauer provided enough details of the brutish and rough variety to convince me this mountain doesn't belong on my life list. One of the climbers that day was a pilot who had spent his life looking down on and understanding cloud formations. When he saw innocent-looking little wisps of clouds he knew them for the harbingers of a truly bad storm, and went lower. No one seemed to take any pleasure in being atop Everest. I missed the IMAX movie, which was being shot at the same time.

gigi
March 9th, 2009, 10:04 PM
I just finished Miss Lonelyhearts by Nathaniel West and I"m about to start Day of the Locust by the same author since it's part of the same volume.

I've never read Zen Mind, Beginners Mind by Shunryu Suzuki, but since I'm in the middle of a 90-day meditation commitment (The Big Sit - sponsored by Tricycle Magazine), I figured this was a good time to dip into it. I've been reading a chapter a night.


And of course, I'm re-reading lots of things in school. Right now it's the Romantic Poets with my seniors - Tomorrow is "Rime of the Ancient Mariner"...check it out if you've never read it. Next up after that is Frankenstein, which is not what you think it is. The monster is nothing at all like the popular conception of a green zombie walking monster - he's articulate, literate, athletic, and tender-hearted. Oh yeah, and he's also a murderous monster.

Mookie
March 10th, 2009, 03:15 AM
All time favorite top three books:

1. Patrick O'Brians Aubrey/Maturin series, 20 books in all. I have read them three times now, in order. None other than Walter Cronkite calls them "Crack cocaine for the literary".

2. The Killer Angels, Michael Shaara

3. Lonesome Dove, Larry McMurtry

I think most have these were mentioned already, so add my votes. Shelby Foote was a great author, historian, and southerner, and as mentioned has passed on. I tried to read his 'Stars in Their Courses' about the battle of Gettysburg, having just visited the battlefield, and I just couldn't do it. The visit made me sad for days, and the book much the same.

flippergirl
March 10th, 2009, 09:05 AM
I feel like I am the fly on the wall when I read Kurt Vonnegut. He has a way of making thoughful, humorous comments on relationships, ideologies, and historical events all in neat little packages in "Bagombo Snuff Box" a collection of short stories.

OH and Coach Ed Nessel's "Swim to Win" . It is helping me to understand the finer point of racing much like this forum does.
Flipper

geochuck
March 27th, 2009, 03:40 PM
Michael Phelps - The Untold Story of A Champion

My wife bought it today on sale half price. Is that a deal or did she overpay???

Ripple
March 28th, 2009, 09:47 AM
Just finished Sage Island, by Samantha Warwick. (Brindle & Glass Publishing). Set in the 20s, about a young swimmer who just misses at the Olympic trials, then sets out to be the first woman to swim the English Channel, only to be beaten to it by Gertrude Ederle. So, she ends up at the Wrigley Ocean Marathon, the first organized Catalina Channel swim. She's a hard character to sympathize with at first, but as the story unfolds, you get the reasons behind her behaviour and personality. Purely fictional, but the author (herself an open water swimmer) mixes in some real characters from the race and period.

smontanaro
March 28th, 2009, 01:38 PM
I find that most of my reading these days is actually via the NY Times app on my iPod Touch. It has its warts and limitations, but it sure is convenient to pop the paper into your coat pocket and have it handy wherever you happen to have the time to do a little reading.

orca1946
March 28th, 2009, 04:23 PM
Sorry, car & driver

csibona
April 9th, 2009, 12:43 PM
Just finished Netherland by Joseph O'Neill. It was good, a little difficult, a little sad and well written.

knelson
April 16th, 2009, 02:20 PM
Just finished Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy. Wow. It's the first thing I've read by him. Probably not the last. A very thought provoking journey into the darker side of man. Don't go anywhere near this unless you think you can handle extreme and totally unvarnished violence and depravity.

gigi
May 17th, 2009, 09:38 PM
In response to knelson above, I second the warning. I haven't read Blood Meridian, but I've read All the Pretty Horses, No Country for Old Men, and The Road. All three were pretty heavy with The Road being the most terrifying thing I have ever read. Stay away if you're the least bit faint-of-heart. I have to say that I think he's a bit of a "guy's writer" which is why I don't dig him all that much, but if I keep going back to his work, there must be something for me there.

I actually came here to report on the book I'm reading now. Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. It's the book I keep turning to when I feel like procrastinating on all these term papers I'm supposed to be reading. So I'm reading quite a bit of it!

It's basically P&P - the actual text - with lines and paragraphs mixed in that involve a zombie sub-plot. So not only do the Bennet girls have a gotta-get-married plot they also have a gotta-stay-alive plot. Of course Mrs Bennet sees the zombies as nothing more than a nuisance in her quest to get those girls married off to some well-to-do propertied man. So far I'd say it's a lot of fun for P&P fans with a sense of humor.

I'm recommending it based on a partial reading....