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geographic2
September 15th, 2007, 04:45 PM
I found a place to swim in my city. It is surpisingly inexpensive with low traffic. It's a nice pool and a smoking deal money-wise. But I have some concerns about swimming for exercise

1. What if any, are the effects of long-term exposure to chlorine?

2. This is an outdoor pool. I would be sucking in oxygen while swimming, and the air in Phoenix can be pretty polluted at times. It makes me wonder if I am compounding the amount of pollution that my lungs take in.

3. I also wonder if I may be more prone to skin fungus, rash, etc.

I am not trying to be negative about this, but I would like some honest input on this.

Thanks,
Dave

ALM
September 15th, 2007, 09:46 PM
1. What if any, are the effects of long-term exposure to chlorine?

Judging by the number of USMS athletes who are still competing in the 80-84, 85-89, and 90-94 age groups, I'd say the effects are minimal. Go to this page and do a search to get an idea. Pretty amazing.

http://www.usms.org/comp/tt/toptenlist.php


2. This is an outdoor pool. I would be sucking in oxygen while swimming, and the air in Phoenix can be pretty polluted at times. It makes me wonder if I am compounding the amount of pollution that my lungs take in.

What are you sucking in when you're not swimming? The same polluted air, right? Granted, your respiration rate probably increases with increased workload, but probably not that much and not for that long.

And what's the alternative? I suppose you could exercise indoors, but there you have potential air problems, too. Mold spores can grow in air conditioning systems, for example.

I think the effects of chlorine or outdoor air on your health are probably minimal compared to the effects of NOT exercising at all.


3. I also wonder if I may be more prone to skin fungus, rash, etc.

No.

Congratulations on finding a pool. Let us know when you compete in your first meet!

---
Anna Lea

ViveBene
September 15th, 2007, 10:38 PM
1. What if any, are the effects of long-term exposure to chlorine?

Thanks,
Dave

Years ago I read of a study finding that competitive swimmers who spent many hours a day in the pool had, as a population, a slightly increased rate of asthma consequent on exposure to chemicals in the inch or so of air above the water. However, this is nothing for recreational swimmers who are not otherwise susceptible to worry about.

Regards,

VB

marksman
September 15th, 2007, 11:34 PM
there's chlorine in drinking water, I wouldn't worry about the chlorine. Just stay out of the midday Phoenix sun to avoid burns.

I've been swimming and jogging...the jogging seems to be really dangerous by comparison, crazy drivers here.

Kevin in MD
September 16th, 2007, 04:33 PM
I found a place to swim in my city. It is surpisingly inexpensive with low traffic. It's a nice pool and a smoking deal money-wise. But I have some concerns about swimming for exercise

1. What if any, are the effects of long-term exposure to chlorine?

While some folks get concerned about the levels of trihalomethanes in indoor pools from the chlorine, it is not a problem for outdoor pools in any way.


2. This is an outdoor pool. I would be sucking in oxygen while swimming, and the air in Phoenix can be pretty polluted at times. It makes me wonder if I am compounding the amount of pollution that my lungs take in.

Same amount as if you are exercising in any other way.



3. I also wonder if I may be more prone to skin fungus, rash, etc.


I've never heard of someone gettingskin fungus from a pool. I'd figurethe chlorine would kill the fungus, that's sort of the point of chlorine.

hofffam
September 16th, 2007, 07:05 PM
Some people will experience skin problems such as athlete's foot and jock itch when they swim - but it isn't because of the swimming per se. It is because they are in humid environments and they don't get truly dried off when they put their clothes back on.

But I think the anecdotal evidence (USMS swimmers) is that lifelong swimmers who swim in chlorinated pools are in far better health than the person who doesn't swim. Se maybe we trade far better cardiovascular health for some potential risk of minor problems associated with swimming.

geographic2
September 16th, 2007, 08:47 PM
Thanks for all your responses to my questions. I am not going to swim competetively. Just for exercise. I tried out the pool yesterday. Did about ten laps. Really enjoyed it. I think this pool is open till 8:00pm on weekdays. The weekends I have no choice but to swim during the day. The challenge is avoiding as much sunlight as possible.

If I have questions about sensibly getting started on an exercise routine, should I ask these questions in a different forum category or start a new thread?

geochuck
September 16th, 2007, 08:59 PM
Why avoid the sunlight? I have never used a sunblocker, I have even heard that most people avoid the sun too much. I normally do not swim from between 11 and 2:30, when the sun is high but have no fear at other times. I just make sure that I get a gradual build up tan before I do longer swims in the daytime but I never between 11 and 2:30.

ViveBene
September 16th, 2007, 09:13 PM
All,

Thought I should clarify my comment about competitive swimmers spending many hours a day in pools. Those in the study were elite, high-level competitors, in the pool say 4 hours per day minimally since forever. And there was a slight uptick in asthma risk for the entire population, which does not translate to an increased risk for any one person.

Sunlight exposure is another matter, and one's personal sensitivity to it weighs in considerably.

Dave, sounds like you're set! Enjoy the outdoor swimming! Poke around on the site and you'll find some existing threads on exercise.

Regards, VB

geographic2
September 22nd, 2007, 05:56 PM
Thanks everyone,

Dave

Josh54
September 23rd, 2007, 01:45 AM
Maybe it's my pool but I have had two health problems: a runny nose after swimming and dry itchy skin. I solved them by using a nose clip and skin cream (after showering).