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Gerdrick
September 18th, 2007, 11:53 AM
Being relatively new to swimming don't know how the “rules” of being sick-getting better-jumping back in the water work. So here's my question:
How soon you think I can go back to swimming after having a very bad bronchitis? I got sick last Wednesday :cry:, do feel better now, BUT the cough is still very strong and the nose is trying to run away... :D
Any suggestions? Supposedly I am on the list to swim a relay in November, so can't miss too many days, on the other hand, don't want to get sicker.... :shakeshead:
Thank you very much!!!:notworthy:

Willow
September 18th, 2007, 12:45 PM
I was just going to post a question about how sick is too sick to swim! I think I will just horn in on your thread, if you don't mind.

I was supposed to swim today, but I feel cold and crappy, and have a stuffy/runny nose, and just feel sorry for myself, but I don't feel THAT bad. I *could* swim, but, not knowing where to draw the line, I stayed home. In your case, I'd stay home a few days. The idea of having to flip on my back in the middle of a length to cough up a lung sounds gross and disruptive. If I were lanemate to a person doing that, I'd probably get out in disgust and paranoia.

Oh, and I should mention that I am seriously germ-phobic, so if I'm comng across as a little extreme, that is why.

Gerdrick
September 18th, 2007, 01:15 PM
Willow
Thanks for writing!
I am just afraid that being in cold water may make my lungs feel worse... So I guess you are right staying that I should stay away from swimming for a couple more days! But it's soooooo hard....:sad:
If you feel like you are just getting sick better to relax at home for a day or two than get really sick like me.....

renie
September 18th, 2007, 01:36 PM
Willow
Thanks for writing!
I am just afraid that being in cold water may make my lungs feel worse... So I guess you are right staying that I should stay away from swimming for a couple more days! But it's soooooo hard....:sad:
If you feel like you are just getting sick better to relax at home for a day or two than get really sick like me.....

Gerdrick, my experience has been that I skip the first day of being really sick (nose won't stop running, for example, achy, stuffy). I work out through injuries and illnesses. However, I do find in my case, that it prolongs my healing time. If I would just take 2 or 3 days off (unheard of!) I'd probably be cured by day 4. Instead, I work out after the first day, and feel crappy for a week or 2. So that being said, as long as your nose is running, I'd stay out of the water. Like Willow, I'd be pretty grossed out if someone was swimming with a running nose. Just think of how awesome you'll feel when you get back in the water!:lolup:

Willow
September 18th, 2007, 01:42 PM
Also, bronchitis is an upper respiratory infection. I've always heard that you avoid doing strenuous exercise with an URI because you don't want the deeper breathing to suck the infection lower into your lungs. I wonder if there is any truth to that worry?

gull
September 18th, 2007, 02:30 PM
Also, bronchitis is an upper respiratory infection. I've always heard that you avoid doing strenuous exercise with an URI because you don't want the deeper breathing to suck the infection lower into your lungs. I wonder if there is any truth to that worry?

No--but if you are ill, the consensus is that you should avoid strenuous exercise. Why place additional demands on a system that is already stressed?

Gerdrick
September 18th, 2007, 02:37 PM
Thank you all for comments! So, I guess I'll rest a bit more.....the only thing is the more I rest the more I feel like the fat is growing in my butt, making it more comfortable to sit! :rofl::rofl::rofl:

ViveBene
September 18th, 2007, 02:39 PM
No--but if you are ill, the consensus is that you should avoid strenuous exercise. Why place additional demands on a system that is already stressed?

As suggested, a commonsense approach will see you through most things. I'll just note that pulmonary toilet (lung cleaning) is achieved through lung use, and if you can stagger through activities in mild cases of lung involvement, you might actually feel better (junk is removed) and get better faster.

Probably apocryphal story: One of the Beat poets, on being told he had TB, elected to ride on top of a train from East Coast to West Coast, gulping in great draughts of cold air along the way. Mirabile dictu, no more TB.

Regards, VB

laineybug
September 18th, 2007, 03:16 PM
Wow, I zipped over to this board to find the answer to this question. I have had bronchitis (doc even did a chest x-ray) for a couple of weeks now. Am feeling much better but still have a cough with a rattle/crackle kinda sound. Will swim easy until, GASP, dare I say it???????, the noodlers get in the pool. I might even join them. I've seen several at different places and they say they are using new equipment--like resistance bands--hummm
TTFN, Lainey

Willow
September 18th, 2007, 05:07 PM
Speaking of the Beats, I bet Gregory Corso is the imp that first put "Pulmonary" and "Toilet" together. I believe it was in the poem
"Radiator Cloaca," was it not?

ViveBene
September 18th, 2007, 05:14 PM
Speaking of the Beats, I bet Gregory Corso is the imp that first put "Pulmonary" and "Toilet" together. I believe it was in the poem
"Radiator Cloaca," was it not?

I don't know; not up on G. Corso. But "pulmonary toilet" is a standard medical term.

Some judicious physical effort, to clean out lungs, gets rid of debris and also ups infection fighting factors elsewhere in the body.

Regards,
VB

laineybug
September 19th, 2007, 10:42 AM
swam last night and I do believe it helped. My lungs feel clearer this morning... folks in the office are not avoiding me, LOL. Did the h20 aerobic thing with the resistance bands too. Mild stiffness, but not really sore, in a lot of different muscle groups. Let me tell you, using a resistance band in the water is very different than on land. For example, if you have the band under your foot and the leg/foot extended behind you, your leg wants to float up so you really have to push down to keep your foot on the bottom of the pool and the band from slipping off your foot. And, you have to deal with the movement of the water/balance. I think using resistance bands in the water works more muscles groups than on land.
TTFN Lainey

martinahappy
September 19th, 2007, 12:30 PM
If you are sick you need to stay out of the water or refrain from any form of exercise. There is now sufficient research that exercising while being sick has a very negative impact on your heart. You may think you do good but you actually do harm to your body. Stay in bed, get better, feel good and then you can jump back into the water. Any active person will quickly be able to catch up with his or her training :-)

Blackbeard's Peg
September 19th, 2007, 02:27 PM
there's a thread around somewhere where people were very animated about the pros and cons of swimming with a cold/other sickness. personally, unless i am near death, i tend to get in. Swam a meet with the flu spring '06, and actually did pretty well (100 free was at the time my 2nd best non-championiship meet time; 500 was 3rd best that year).

just be careful about
a) spreading your illness; and
b) nursing yourself back to health.

Slowswim
September 19th, 2007, 03:05 PM
I remember the old test was: if the stuffiness was above your shoulders and a runny nose was running clear, go haed a train/race.

renie
September 19th, 2007, 03:36 PM
If you are sick you need to stay out of the water or refrain from any form of exercise. There is now sufficient research that exercising while being sick has a very negative impact on your heart. You may think you do good but you actually do harm to your body. Stay in bed, get better, feel good and then you can jump back into the water. Any active person will quickly be able to catch up with his or her training :-)

I haven't heard that -- can I ask where this research is coming from?

Gerdrick
September 19th, 2007, 04:26 PM
If you are sick you need to stay out of the water or refrain from any form of exercise. There is now sufficient research that exercising while being sick has a very negative impact on your heart. You may think you do good but you actually do harm to your body. Stay in bed, get better, feel good and then you can jump back into the water. Any active person will quickly be able to catch up with his or her training :-)

I've heard about it also...don't remember where though. Anyway, I tried to do my "sport" walk today with the dogs and after about 20 min I thought I would pass out from being tired and weak... :cane:
Guess I'll wait a bit more to jump in the pool. Maybe until I finish all of my antibiotics. :whiteflag: