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cathlaur
October 6th, 2007, 10:24 AM
Okay so compared to some of you I am barely wet or a swimmer yet,, but I have started swimming again back in Sept of this year and am going 4 mornings a week. I am pretty proud of myself and can see that this is something I am going to do for life. A. because I like it and B. because I have to for both my physical and mental health.

So as my friends and co-workers realize what I am doing I am surprised that 75% of them think I am crazy. Why would I do that? Getting up so early is dumb? I am never going to keep doing this. I am over 40 so I should be happy with who I am. OMG it makes me crazy:frustrated:. The other 25% might think the early morning practices are crazy but they think what I am doing is wonderful. ( though they would never do it :lmao:)
I just do not understand why people think they can tell me what they think especially when it is negative and really none of their business. My one girlfriend who is in kick A$$ shape said " they are jealous" they are used to seeing you how you are. To know that you are going to change your body and just be more mentally strong makes them realize that they are weak. I laughed but maybe she has a point.

Another wise friend said, " they have not gone through what you have in the past couple of years: Thryoid cancer and a daughter diagnosed with Retinitis Pigmentosa ( degenerative eye disease) so they dont know that you need to do this for you.

I think there is a time in ones life to step it up and really enjoy and push yourself or stay the same and watch your body and mind start to deteriorate. I AM READY FOR CHANGE.

But I just wish people would stop giving me their 2 cents when I never asked for their opinions in the first place.

Please tell me this has happened to others, or I am just lucky to be surrounded by lots of would be Dr Phil's?

Katie

ViveBene
October 6th, 2007, 10:37 AM
But I just wish people would stop giving me their 2 cents when I never asked for their opinions in the first place.

Please tell me this has happened to others, or I am just lucky to be surrounded by lots of would be Dr Phil's?Katie

<Chuckle>

I think it happens to many. I answered an interview question, "What do you do with your free time?" not with "none of your business" but "I swim a mile a day." Shocked silence, a drawing away, some shuffling of papers, more silence. It's an impenetrable wall. That's why you come here, right?

Some of my nearest stopped talking to me after I got a coach. Swimming is OK for a hobby but a waste of time if one decides to get more serious about it. My solution: if I don't want the bizarre responses from others, I don't share my (presumably) bizarre behavior!

Regards, VB

geochuck
October 6th, 2007, 10:39 AM
I have a friend that I have helped with his swimming. He was not a swimmer when he was younger and really did not start swimming until he was 25 years of age, now he is well into his thirty's. I have worked with him for a little over a year and next year he is going to swim the English Channell. His co-workers at first thought he was crazy, now they see him reaching his goals, they are backing him. He would have crossed this year but had to stop training about a month before his attempt because his employer sent him on the road.

CreamPuff
October 6th, 2007, 10:51 AM
Katie,

This is easy. You are right. They (those who think you are crazy) are wrong.
Don't feel bad or let this get you down! People telling me what I can't do is the story of my life. Typically, I look at the naysayers and think to myself, "Ugh. I DON'T want to emulate them in any way!"

"You can't do that" Memories that come to mind:

"I want to watch you get beat in the 100 free." You bet I won after that comment.

People want to know why I want to swim USA swimming at some meets. "Why?! That's silly!" Uh no, it's just something different and it's a new challenge. Racing different people keeps me interested and motivated in the sport. Even getting my a@@ kicked can be a good learning experience.

"Why would you do doubles? That's crazy." Uh. To get better. To lessen my migraines. To reach my goals.

"You'll never be elected to executive management." You bet I was.

When others start :bitching:, you know you are on the right track.

I like the saying, "Talk is cheap." You are taking action and that's what counts.

You go girl! :cheerleader:

cathlaur
October 6th, 2007, 11:20 AM
Thanks everyone

I love hearing your reactions to people. It makes me realize it is just not my friends LOL. I really thought most people would think it was wonderful. Boy I was wrong.

I guess I will just have to keep plugging along and enjoy the ride.

Geochuck. WOW that is wonderful. The English Channel now that is impressive. It is amazing what the mind and body can do when one puts their mind to it.

VB. I started right away with the Masters program. I really really like the coach we have. I could never do this on my own. He makes the practices fun and I dont think I would push myself this hard on my own. It is all good. Alot of people at work noticed my very consistant routine changed. I work in a jail and I used to get to work for 6:20 to hit the gym now I am in at 7:30 after my swim. SO everyone noticed. Of course they first assumed I was not exercising anymore LOL. Then when they realized I had really upped the exercise I got the comments. Weird.

(s)he man. You are truly an inspiration. I am not at double practices yet OMG OMG OMG LOL I am still hurting from the 4 mornings I am doing now. But maybe one day. YOU NEVER KNOW

Katie

Leonard Jansen
October 6th, 2007, 11:39 AM
It's only going to get worse. In a while, when you end up with a build like Fort or (S)he-man, the guys at work will be hitting on you non-stop. That's the good news. The bad news is don't take any food or drink from your female co-workers because it will probably be poisoned, they will hate you so much.

Kudos on your thyroid cancer survival. My wife has thyroid problems due to a tumor in her head. It is a never-ending battle to keep her in balance.

Good luck.

-LBJ

cathlaur
October 6th, 2007, 11:47 AM
Ah Lbj

You are funny. I dont know what Sheman looks like but I am guessing awesome. I am already 5 10 with large shoulders but I need to lose some pounds.

Yes the thryoid is hard. I gained 25 pounds after two surgeries and RAI. It was hard. SO that is why I am so excited about the swimming. It will help

I am sorry about your wife. I hope she is doing well. NOTHING like an illness to make you realize what you want out of life.

Cheers

Katie

CreamPuff
October 6th, 2007, 12:03 PM
I am pretty proud of myself and can see that this is something I am going to do for life. A. because I like it and B. because I have to for both my physical and mental health.

Another wise friend said, " they have not gone through what you have in the past couple of years: Thryoid cancer and a daughter diagnosed with Retinitis Pigmentosa ( degenerative eye disease) so they dont know that you need to do this for you.

Katie

Katie, I can't imagine what you are going through with your and your daughter's health problems.

I had some terrible eye issues and I swam through the whole ordeal.

Swimming saved my sanity (what little I have!) I had some docs tell me to quit swimming; had several misdiagnoses along with some old, antiquated surgeries which would have left facial scaring and required lots of down time (no exercise for months); finally I came across a guy who diagnosed me correctly and offered me a minimally invasive surgery and supported my swimming. There was a risk of blindness with this surgery, but swimming 2x a day helped keep me focused and positive during this terrible time of waiting to have the surgery. (That's how I got into swimming doubles! Now I'm hooked!) Anyway, I was very, very fortunate and it all worked out. But it was a life changing event. Swimming through it all kept me on track.

My prayers go out to you and your daughter. I say, "Swim through it!" :cheerleader:

dorothyrde
October 6th, 2007, 12:18 PM
Oh it is not non-swimmers, it is non-exercisers. I don't tell too many people my exercise routine because I get tired of hearing "you get up and WHAT time and do WHAT?" or "You to to the pool after work, REALLY".

When asked how I lost weight, how I achieved the muscles I have, I kind of glaze over it, because if I tell them, "I eat really clean, no junk, and work out like a fiend", their eyes glaze over. They want to hear there is a magic pill or something.

I had one lady tell me this week that the biking is really working(I have not biked since early September because it is too dark in the morning now). I did not correct her and tell her no, it is the swimming, weight lifting, step aerobics and yoga....I just said...thanks.

knelson
October 6th, 2007, 12:54 PM
My one girlfriend who is in kick A$$ shape said " they are jealous" they are used to seeing you how you are. To know that you are going to change your body and just be more mentally strong makes them realize that they are weak. I laughed but maybe she has a point.

I think she does have a point. It's almost a "misery loves company" kind of thing. Not that they are necessarily miserable, but they are satisfied being out of shape because, for the most part, they are probably surrounded by others who are also out of shape. Hearing that one of their partners in "out-of-shapeness" might be making a change for the better puts a chink in their armor.

Donna
October 6th, 2007, 01:09 PM
Everyone at work knows that I swim seriously and am training with the kids team in town. They have also seen my go from 220 lbs to now 165 (over the last 3 years) and the changes. Many of them are trying to lose weight but are going the eating alone route or in some cases taking the bariatric surgery route, rather than adding exercise to their routines.

I try telling them eating alone might get you lighter and help you lose fat but your still just a flabby as before. If you exercise you gain muscle, look better, feel better and can eat what ever you want. That is why I just love taking my 2pm walk to the snack machine for a snickers or something like that and just enjoy it all the way back to my desk. They are all just hating the fact I can do that and still continue to lose weight faster than they are.

Revenge tastes sweet when it is chocolate!!!:thhbbb:

That Guy
October 6th, 2007, 01:55 PM
I think she does have a point. It's almost a "misery loves company" kind of thing. Not that they are necessarily miserable, but they are satisfied being out of shape because, for the most part, they are probably surrounded by others who are also out of shape. Hearing that one of their partners in "out-of-shapeness" might be making a change for the better puts a chink in their armor.

When someone tells me that they can't understand why I train as much as I do (or at all, for that matter) I usually nod and think, "Good. Your comfort zone is not a place I'd care to know." I've never uttered that out loud, but some people are pretty mean in the way they put down exercise, so the day may come... when I have to duck...

Reading this thread has been good. It's a slow Saturday morning and I haven't done anything yet. Now I'm psyched to hit the pool (and run and bike) this afternoon. :)

Edit: I forgot to add, I make sure to get my daily allowance of chocolate too!

inklaire
October 6th, 2007, 02:24 PM
The bad news is don't take any food or drink from your female co-workers because it will probably be poisoned, they will hate you so much.

Female, male co-workers, doesn't matter. It's guaranteed that just about every item of "food" offered at my workplace will be poisoned with trans fat, enormous quantities of sugar, saturated fat, and/or salt.

Allen Stark
October 6th, 2007, 03:13 PM
It is human nature to resist change.You are changing and that makes them uncomfortable and they want you to change back.
My wife said a friend asked her"is Allen still swimming" and she replied"yes,he's still breathing."

The Fortress
October 6th, 2007, 04:43 PM
I think she does have a point. It's almost a "misery loves company" kind of thing. Not that they are necessarily miserable, but they are satisfied being out of shape because, for the most part, they are probably surrounded by others who are also out of shape. Hearing that one of their partners in "out-of-shapeness" might be making a change for the better puts a chink in their armor.

I agree with this analysis. People who are overweight and/or out of shape want vindication that they are just "gracefully aging" and you threaten that notion.

People should do whatever they want to do with their free time. If some want to veg out in front of the TV and not make time for exercise, so be it. They live with the consequences. If you prefer to exercise, as I do, go for it and ignore the nay sayers. Unfortunately, some people just cannot bear the success of others, so they are flat out mean. (I was just accused of self aggrandizement for simply wanting to compete in a meet for god's sake.) Do what you want and the others be damned. IMO you are doing something healthy and making good choices. Stay with it!

Also, even the most supportive non-swimming friends can only tolerate a discussion about swimming for brief moments. Probably best to save your swimming discussions for swimming friends, forum friends, etc. Otherwise, you get the glazed eyes.

FindingMyInnerFish
October 6th, 2007, 04:49 PM
Dorothyrde is right about this not just being a swimming thing. I swim and run--and get comments sometimes about how bad running is for me, how I'm going to wreck my knees. Given the problems in this country with overweight, I think a lot of people feel threatened by anything that bucks the trend. And women who work out are especially seen as a threat: once I was in the gym lifting and some man said, "you'll get musclebound if you do that."

It's something people don't want to deal with and so they put down those who make the effort.

Don't let them mess with your mind! You rock! In fact, kudos to all the forumites here who have given me inspiration to keep on keeping on! :cheerleader:

pwolf66
October 6th, 2007, 05:31 PM
Katie,

Take a deep breath and DO NOT PAY ATTENTION to those folks. YOU know the reasons why you swim and they are GOOD ones. So keep at it and let the little people go on with living thier empty lives and YOU live your life to the fullest.

Paul

david.margrave
October 6th, 2007, 05:39 PM
It seems like harmless sparring and competitive behavior between friends and acquaintances. Don't sweat it, just stick with it, and when you show results maybe you'll provide them encouragement to take up swimming or some other exercise routine as well.

david.margrave
October 6th, 2007, 05:42 PM
Dorothyrde is right about this not just being a swimming thing. I swim and run--and get comments sometimes about how bad running is for me, how I'm going to wreck my knees. Given the problems in this country with overweight, I think a lot of people feel threatened by anything that bucks the trend. And women who work out are especially seen as a threat: once I was in the gym lifting and some man said, "you'll get musclebound if you do that."

It goes both ways, inactive people get reinforcement from each other (at least recent research suggests this) as do active people, and maybe you'll give them encouragement to change by setting an example.

The guy at the gym was just trying to flirt.

SwimStud
October 6th, 2007, 05:58 PM
That is why I just love taking my 2pm walk to the snack machine for a snickers or something like that and just enjoy it all the way back to my desk. They are all just hating the fact I can do that and still continue to lose weight faster than they are.

Revenge tastes sweet when it is chocolate!!!:thhbbb:

LOL Donna I hope you slooooooooooow down passing them...and softly "mmm" as you mucnh the choc!

ViveBene
October 6th, 2007, 07:25 PM
As Richard Feynman famously said, "What do YOU care what other people think?"

I am not sure that nonswimmers DO think their opinions matter; they are engaging in chat lite. On the other hand, swimming daily does seem to edge toward the esoteric. In part, I expect, it's the effort: imagine going someplace, changing clothes, getting wet all over, changing clothes, driving back -- it's a mini-trip to the moon, all compressed into a tiny segment of time. A friend swims: 10 laps on Sunday. She's perfectly happy and has improved over time. Maybe swimming -- headfirst into the subterranean (Hands of the Black Masseuse, anyone?) elements -- lacks the virtuous glitter of ballet, yoga, or figure skating, all of which should be done daily, too. I dunno. :dunno: I would find someone who played golf every weekend totally weird, but I might make the effort to discover the motivation.

Air temp in Chicago is 86 deg., the lake is in the 60s, and I am sick. :violin:

Regards, VB

dorothyrde
October 6th, 2007, 07:27 PM
I soooooo hate people telling a woman they will get muscle bound from lifting, grrrrrr. First of all, muscles are beautiful, secondly, women cannot get huge like men, grrrrrr.

This summer I was coming in to work in bike clothes, and I got a Wow from a co-worker. The comment was Wow, how do you get those legs!!<I am thinking, hard work>

ViveBene
October 6th, 2007, 07:32 PM
This summer I was coming in to work in bike clothes, and I got a Wow from a co-worker. The comment was Wow, how do you get those legs!!<I am thinking, hard work>

Sing out loud, grrrl!

VB

TomBrooklyn
October 7th, 2007, 07:32 AM
I really thought most people would think it was wonderful. Boy I was wrong.
Brian Tracy mentions this phenomena on his tape, "Maximum Achievement."

cathlaur
October 7th, 2007, 09:13 AM
Thanks everyone for your stories and thoughts on this issue. It is really wonderful.

As one person says " who cares and it should not matter what people think" I agree totally. I think I was just more surprised that people felt the way they did. Why should they care what I do. The human race is very very interesting:p. I guess it is a good thing we are all so different.


Donna I thought that was great about eating a snickers bar in front of your co-workers as you are still losing weight. OH YEAH BRING ON THE CHOCOLATE. Though I need to incorporate better eating. That starts Tuesday. Last weekend was a huge wedding in Atlanta, this weekend is our Canadian Thanksgiving. I can tell I am losing inches as my pants fit better so that is awesome

I will continue to swim and enjoy the benefits of weighloss, health and friendship.

Cheers

Katie

geochuck
October 7th, 2007, 09:40 AM
A great saying

Always put off today, what you can do tomorrow.

or is it? --------

bud
October 7th, 2007, 12:06 PM
...


"What other people think about me is none of my business."


some celebrity's grandmother used to say this. i believe i heard it from Sandra Bullock on the Tonight Show this past summer or spring. it has quickly become one of my favorites.

interesting thread. i'm surprised at the percentages of naysayers. i agree with the "misery loves company" idea. and yes, it is definitely a case of those who exercise, and those who don't. "If you wanna do the dance, ya' gotta pay the band."

the "magic pill" concept will be around as long the medical industry has the power they currently have. i'm seeing ads on tv now for Enbrel (http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=enbrel) (w/ a price tag of $1,500/mo :-o ) to treat psoriasis. i have a rather severe case of that condition that i keep very much under control with AIM CWR (http://www.theaimcompanies.com/product-readmore.aspx?prodcode=2453E) (a natural product) for about $120/year! (or 150x cheaper.) boy do those tv ads make me squirm.

The History of Medicine

2000 B.C. - Here, eat this root
1000 A.D. - That root is heathen. Here, say this prayer.
1850 A.D. - That prayer is superstition. Here, drink this potion.
1940 A.D. - That potion is snake oil. Here, swallow this pill.
1985 A.D. - That pill is ineffective. Here, take this antibiotic.
2000 A.D. - That antibiotic doesn't work anymore. Here, eat this root.


i've gotten to a point in my life (less than 1 year shy of the half century mark) where i really only want to be around people who put as much (or more) energy into being healthy & fit as i do. (for those that think that is elitist i say 'tough', but my $ is on the bet that most folks who read this know what i'm talking about.) i see a lot of good bodies at the facility where i swim (they have a gym & stuff there too), and most of the folks at Contra Dance (http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=contra+dance) are fairly fit, but outside of that (as far as my daily routine goes)... forget it. even though this is a virtual community to me, i'd have to say that this forum has by far the greatest number of people who are already there (fit & healthy), or are serious and dedicated about making a positive change in their life's health. i reckon that is why i keep coming back. {applies index finger to temple} hummmmmm.

and don't get me wrong, i don't think it is all about having a great looking body. i work hard to look fit because that is how i like to be and i like the compliments. but i get really stoked when i see folks show up on a regular basis at the pool that are obviously trying to loose weight and improve their health, and i'm disappointed when i stop seeing them. it is indeed a very tough row to hoe. it is easy to get in shape when you are already healthy and maybe 10-15# overweight, but if you have health issues it can take a phenomenal amount of inner strength and fortitude. regardless of how fast your are or how you look, the real winners are those that stick with it and do good for themselves (IMHO).

i think "girls" who lift weights rock! it can get extreme, just check out Bev Francis (http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=bev+francis) in the movie Pumping Iron 2: The Women (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pumping_Iron_II:_The_Women) (the imdb (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0089852/) link and user comments (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0089852/usercomments) are handy too), which i found extremely interesting when i saw it shortly after its 1985 release. it has left a lasting impression on me, check it out.

i've seen lots of articles stating that lifting weights (especially less weight w/ more reps) is especially good for you as you get older. why not make it a habit now?

scwids
October 7th, 2007, 04:20 PM
I think part of it is also that non-swimmers truly can't picture themselves mentally doing anything like what you are doing. It is human nature to condemn what we don't understand ourselves. I will admit fully when I hear about my friend who does ultrathoning and is entering a 50 mile trail run, my immediate first thought is "That's ****ing CRAZY!" Me of course being from the group of people for whom running is a torture only to be endured to improve my fitness for my swimming.

Your point is great though - I don't actually tell my friend OUT LOUD I think running 50 miles straight is crazy - I just cheer her on! Some people really need to get a hobby. :p

funkyfish
October 10th, 2007, 11:15 PM
i think "girls" who lift weights rock! it can get extreme, just check out Bev Francis (http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=bev+francis) in the movie Pumping Iron 2: The Women (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pumping_Iron_II:_The_Women) (the imdb (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0089852/) link and user comments (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0089852/usercomments) are handy too), which i found extremely interesting when i saw it shortly after its 1985 release. it has left a lasting impression on me, check it out.

I agree. Unless the ladies are "juicing" then they get toned and shapely, not "musclebound." I used to think Bev was extreme, but compared to many of the IFBB pro female bodybuilders of today, she's just not as extreme.

I always laugh when people think lifting weights will "bulk up" women. For a while my wife was interested in lifting, I got her to bench 135 for a couple of reps, and to my suprise, she still looked like a woman.

As far as swimming or exercise goes, I believe most people who do it consistently do so because they enjoy it. Why is it that doing an activity, and wanting to improve at it, is seen as "odd"? Now here's a banana and a bouncy thing.
:banana::bouncing:

cathlaur
October 11th, 2007, 08:05 AM
The weightlifting issue with woman is interesting. I have lifted weights for several years. I work in a male dominated workplace and we have a workout room which is awesome. It has some cardio machines and tons of weights. NOTHING FOR LEGS mind you :doh:. The boys all want to look good up top and dont seem to care about their legs too much.GEESH.

I am a large boned woman at 5 10 ( huge shoulders) I am toned but overweight. I know underneath the flab is some great muscles. I have definition in my biceps and triceps. I think swimming will really help with that as my arms are often tired after a workout.

Toned woman look fabulous. Weight training is so important for our bone health as well. Now that I am swimming in the morning instead of the gym I have only been hitting the weights 1x a week so I am going to have to change that up somehow. I am just so darn tired LOL LOL

Scwids, good point about people thinking others are crazy. You triathaletes are crazy in my mind:wave:. So I guess you are right.

Perhaps the best thing to do is not worry about what anyone else says and just worry about what we think as individuals.

Cheers Katie

I need :coffee::coffee::coffee:

swimminlyn
October 11th, 2007, 09:35 AM
My favorite thing to here is...
Why do you swim so much, aren't you too old to be doing that? Isn't it time you gave up competing?

I just look at them like they are stupid and tell them to say that to the 70, 80 and 90+ men and women that still do it. At 34 I am young in the world of master swimming.

My other favorite that I have heard from non swimmer, mostly my softball friends is...
Why do you swim? It is not a REAL sport.

I just look at them stupid too and say, And slow pitch softball is? Where any over weight drunk man or woman with a cigarette hanging out of his/her mouth between every inning qualifies that as a sport.

I have pretty much given up defending the sport I love and have since I was little. It all comes down to them that diet and still gain weight and I can out eat them and I am loosing weight. Now whos sport is better?

cathlaur
October 11th, 2007, 09:41 AM
34 is toooooooooooooooo OLD to SWIM:rofl:. WOW I am 41. I wonder how I even manage to get up at all :cane:. GEESH people kill me.

I had to laugh as there are a lot of smokers at my work place to. They are the ones who cannot believe I am doing this either. It makes you wonder as they are smoking with an extra large triple triple coffee in hand.

You should get one of your softball friends to come to one of your practices and you go to one of theirs LOL LOL. I am betting you will be MUCH better at softball than they are at swimming.

Cheers

Katie

SwimStud
October 11th, 2007, 09:44 AM
The weightlifting issue with woman is interesting. I have lifted weights for several years. I work in a male dominated workplace and we have a workout room which is awesome. It has some cardio machines and tons of weights. NOTHING FOR LEGS mind you :doh:. The boys all want to look good up top and dont seem to care about their legs too much.GEESH.


Nothing is funnier than guys parading about in sleeveless t's and shorts... big chest and forearms and little stick legs... walking mushrooms...

I point them out to my wife and tell her to look...
The sad fact is working legs properly is too hard for most gymrats...

cathlaur
October 11th, 2007, 09:47 AM
Exactly it makes me laugh. I work in a jail so the boys in their Correctional Officer Uniforms look all toned and tough in their shirts with their arms showing. But if you see them in shorts they look kind of hilarious looking.
They also seem to lack cardio as well. As my g/f and I do cardio and weights they just do the weights. To each his own I guess.

Katie

swimminlyn
October 11th, 2007, 10:01 AM
Katie you are right about me going to softball. I played in a tournament not to long ago and did very well the first 2 games, but the last 2 games were a little slower and I was extremely sore the next day. But this year I have only played maybe 20 games. Last year I play around 200. I was gone almost every weekend and played 4 nights a week. Softball was alot easier to do but harder on the body and I gain so much weight.

I will take the pleasure I get from a painful swim practice over softball any day.

dorothyrde
October 11th, 2007, 10:03 AM
Hey, I am MUCH better at softball than swimming....but then, I am pretty darn good at softball.

Katie, work to get that weight off. I have gotten so many comments lately about how buff and lean I am getting and I must be doing different weight training now. I am not, but the fat over the muscles is going away, so they finally show....except the abs, when you lose weight at 46 all you get is wrinkled loose skin, sigh.

cathlaur
October 11th, 2007, 10:08 AM
swimminlyn Yes softball makes you sore but I am sure the food and perhaps the beer or booze does not help either LOL. It is great that you do both.

Dorothy . You have done so well with your weightloss and inches lost. That is awesome. I am starting really hard with the food on Monday. I am excited. I put on a shirt today that I bought about 6 weeks ago and have not worn. It is much looser in the back area. SO THAT IS GOOD THING.

I know that both food and exericise are important. I am looking forward to incorporating both now. It is time to just do it.

Thanks for the encouragement. Dont you hate that you never lose where you really need to first LOL

Katie

The Fortress
October 11th, 2007, 10:11 AM
...except the abs, when you lose weight at 46 all you get is wrinkled loose skin, sigh.

That's what clothes are for!! You just keep right on getting buff and lean. I'm glad you're getting some compliments!

I pretty much suck at softball ... and most ball sports. :notworthy: I seem to only excel in sports where you use just the body ... Weird.

You keep at it girls!

swimminlyn
October 11th, 2007, 10:22 AM
Fortress...
My first time out this year I felt like I had to learn to run all of again. The jogging wasn't bad but my legs were a little wobbly the 1st fly ball I had to chase down. Then there was trying to throw the softball. Now that was a site. Trying to get the follow through and not release the ball above my head like my are was trying to enter the water on a freestyle stroke.

I have since put away my bat bag and am getting ready for a fun winter season of swimming. My 1st meet in is 2.5 weeks in Indianapolis.

The Fortress
October 11th, 2007, 10:34 AM
Fortress...
My first time out this year I felt like I had to learn to run all of again. The jogging wasn't bad but my legs were a little wobbly the 1st fly ball I had to chase down. Then there was trying to throw the softball. Now that was a site. Trying to get the follow through and not release the ball above my head like my are was trying to enter the water on a freestyle stroke.

I have since put away my bat bag and am getting ready for a fun winter season of swimming. My 1st meet in is 2.5 weeks in Indianapolis.

It takes awhile for your legs to adapt to running. When I lay off the running during a taper or something and then start back, I have the total plods for awhile. But then it gets better. Running is a good endorphin boost and cross training for me.

Good luck at your meet!! Remember it is not self-aggrandizing or selfish to want to compete in meets and have fun. But so many just don't get that. Pfftttt..... to them.

dorothyrde
October 11th, 2007, 11:00 AM
I actually hit harder now than I used to before I swam. I think the upper body muscles are stronger and that has translated to better hitting. Before I had to really rely on sprint speed to get base hits!

Of course now the only time I play is with the girls I coach.

And yes, coverage is good for the belly, one piece swim suits have always been a must for me! I have lost 3 inches on my waist since July, so I am shrinking!

TomBrooklyn
October 11th, 2007, 11:35 AM
Remember it is not self-aggrandizing or selfish to want to compete in meets and have fun.
There's nothing wrong with self aggrandizement--when used in the sense of enhancement, rather than exaggeration.

pwolf66
October 11th, 2007, 11:52 AM
I actually hit harder now than I used to before I swam. I think the upper body muscles are stronger and that has translated to better hitting.

I hear you.

Just in the 4 weeks since I started swimming, I have noticed that my golf game has improved. I'm now a bit more accurate and about 5-6 yards longer now than I was a month ago. It's all about strengthening that core.


Paul

The Fortress
October 11th, 2007, 12:10 PM
There's nothing wrong with self aggrandizement--when used in the sense of enhancement, rather than exaggeration.

What makes you think I would use it for "exaggeration?" I'm not sure I even understand what that means in this context.

I just flat out like to compete in meets, and I do it damn seldomly. I think they're fun. I like to race. And I can't train without them. I don't begrudge fitness swimmers. I applaud their efforts. But I think they or others should not criticize my desire to compete.

You appear to be picking a philosophical fight for some reason, whoever you are. Pffftttt....

dorothyrde
October 11th, 2007, 12:13 PM
Fort I hear you. I wish I could compete more, not because I am any good, but because I enjoy it and it helps to have a goal to train for. I keep telling myself to be patient and that in 4 years the last one skips off to college and maybe my time will be my own(although my money probably will not be).

shark
October 11th, 2007, 12:23 PM
Swimmers are the most dedicated individuals to their sport. I argue this point all the time to "other sport" coaches. Noone goes through as much as swimmers do. Name another sport that does it pretty much deaf, half blind and almost nekked.

Some will never know, others will never see. - Ray Bussard

SwimStud
October 11th, 2007, 12:26 PM
Fort I hear you. I wish I could compete more, not because I am any good, but because I enjoy it and it helps to have a goal to train for. I keep telling myself to be patient and that in 4 years the last one skips off to college and maybe my time will be my own(although my money probably will not be).


Dorothy we all eagerly await your 48 US states swim meet tour in 2011!
;)

Glider
October 11th, 2007, 12:26 PM
Fort,

Someone is literally plagiarizing from American Heritage Dictionary:

self-aggrandizement:
noun: The act or practice of enhancing or exaggerating one's own importance, power, or reputation

Don't sweat it -- most of us get your desire to compete. I'm not sure what he's driving at. :dunno:

Nothing wrong here at all. Carry on:bighug:

Mark



What makes you think I would use it for "exaggeration?" I'm not sure I even understand what that means in this context.

I just flat out like to compete in meets, and I do it damn seldomly. I think they're fun. I like to race. And I can't train without them. I don't begrudge fitness swimmers. I applaud their efforts. But I think they or others should not criticize my desire to compete.

The Fortress
October 11th, 2007, 12:29 PM
Fort,

Someone is literally plagiarizing from American Heritage Dictionary:

self-aggrandizement:
noun: The act or practice of enhancing or exaggerating one's own importance, power, or reputation

Don't sweat it -- most of us get your desire to compete. I'm not sure what he's driving at. :dunno:

Nothing wrong here at all. Carry on:bighug:

Mark


Thanks, Mark. It's probably an alias trying to cause trouble or diss me. I know some that are fond of dictionaries.

dorothyrde
October 11th, 2007, 12:31 PM
Dorothy we all eagerly await your 48 US states swim meet tour in 2011!
;):lmao:

Unfortunately, that would cost money, and the cost of college.....although the second kid has a full 529, did not get that soon enough on the first one.

swimminlyn
October 11th, 2007, 12:37 PM
Fort I agree with you. I love to compete. It gives me something to work for in practice. If I didn't look forward to meets, I wouldn't be in the water as much.

Shark you are right too. When I was coaching the high school wrestling coach would bring in a couple wrestlers to help with conditioning. They quickly found a new appreciation for swimmers and could not wait to get back to the mat.

aquageek
October 11th, 2007, 12:44 PM
I've always found it interesting that other sports will come to swimming practice but swimmers will never go to their practice. Probably because swimmers are kind of goofy out of the water. Then again, I never wanted to go to a wresting or football practice for fear of immediate death.

cathlaur
October 11th, 2007, 01:15 PM
Fort

I hear ya on the wanting and loving to compete. I am hoping that once I am in better shape I start to enter a few meets. Meets can prove that your hard work has paid off or it can show you what you need to work on. It is all good.

It is funny that as someone posted before that swimmers get little respect. YET everything you read states that swimming is one of the best forms of exercise there is. HMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM . UM I to would not want to go to a wrestling or football practice LOL.


WOW 48 States swim tour. LOL does that really exist ( okay don't forget I am your Canadian friend)

Katie

Slowswim
October 11th, 2007, 03:05 PM
Swimmers are the most dedicated individuals to their sport. I argue this point all the time to "other sport" coaches. Noone goes through as much as swimmers do. Name another sport that does it pretty much deaf, half blind and almost nekked.

Some will never know, others will never see. - Ray Bussard

Cross country. Although, you're not quite as nekkid, you can't hear anything, there is no black line to follow so getting lost is always possible; you can't count laps so you have to feel your distance, and you never know where the finish is until you can finally see it; The race changes based on weather. Lap swimmers are in optimal conditions. X-Country can change during the race. There is wind, rain, hills, mud, sand, water and contact from other competitors. I'd see more broken bones at a X-Country meet than a football game.

And lastly, (I loved to say this to the "ball" players) My sport is your sport's punishment!

Honestly, I don't think you can compare them because the technical skill of swimming is so much bigger a part of the sport. Especially if you compare Sprints (running) to swimming; no skill at all. You either have fast twitch or you don't. Its all genetics.

swimminlyn
October 11th, 2007, 04:26 PM
You are right SloSwim...
running foul poles in high school till you got sick was not fun. Those were the days that I wanted to be in the water. At that point swim practice seemed alot easier and more fun. I give all runners great respect because it is very disciplined to get out and just run for miles. My knees are too bad to do that, so my running is limited to 1 or 2 bases at a time and chasing balls in the outfield.

TomBrooklyn
October 11th, 2007, 04:28 PM
self-aggrandizement:
noun: The act or practice of enhancing or exaggerating one's own importance, power, or reputation

I'm not sure what he's driving at. :dunno:
What I was driving at was is nothing wrong with enhancing (aggrandizing) oneself's power, strength, or knowledge.

Allen Stark
October 12th, 2007, 02:59 PM
I think any athlete who pursues any sport(or stroke for that matter) is worthy of respect.Even though I curse them under my breath when they mess up my swim, I even respect noodlers as they are being active and many are doing the most exercise they can tolerate,and thats much better than being a couch potato.
I love to compete.It gives me something to build my workouts around.If I didn't compete I'd probably swim a mile 3-4 days a week and that would be it,except I'd skip more workouts probably.I know people can measure their progress/regress many ways;pounds,inches,ability to complete a set,etc. but for me the best measurement is how I do at my taper meet.:groovy::groovy:

cathlaur
October 14th, 2007, 12:10 PM
I look forward to my first meet. Not sure when that will be but I will certainly let you all know.

Thanks for all the input everyone

Katie

Midas
October 14th, 2007, 03:21 PM
What I was driving at was is nothing wrong with enhancing (aggrandizing) oneself's power, strength, or knowledge.

That's what I thought you were driving at too, and I completely agree with you.

FindingMyInnerFish
October 14th, 2007, 04:40 PM
Cross country. Although, you're not quite as nekkid, you can't hear anything, there is no black line to follow so getting lost is always possible; you can't count laps so you have to feel your distance, and you never know where the finish is until you can finally see it; The race changes based on weather. Lap swimmers are in optimal conditions. X-Country can change during the race. There is wind, rain, hills, mud, sand, water and contact from other competitors. I'd see more broken bones at a X-Country meet than a football game.

And lastly, (I loved to say this to the "ball" players) My sport is your sport's punishment!

Honestly, I don't think you can compare them because the technical skill of swimming is so much bigger a part of the sport. Especially if you compare Sprints (running) to swimming; no skill at all. You either have fast twitch or you don't. Its all genetics.

Yeah, I enjoy that saying, "my sport is your sport's punishment"--another one that I've seen adapted to running, swimming, and rowing is "Athletes [fill in one of aforementioned sports]. Others just play games." :D

But Allen Stark has it right... whatever gets ya movin'! In fact, gotta get movin' right now... to catch a quick swim before the pool closes... Knee yelled at me today when I attempted a long run, and I'm so grateful now to have two sports to enjoy and (albeit slowly) compete in!