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Czarazuk
December 4th, 2007, 02:05 PM
Has anyone noticed that swimmers have excellent control of their choking reflexes?

It is inevitable that swimmers will breath water on occasion. During freestyle, for example, I sure we have all exhaled in preparation for another breath when a wave crashes into our mouths causing the first part of the inhale to be all water. At this point we have two options: (1) We can stop swimming, make gagging sounds that echo throughout the pool area, and act as if we just had a brush with death, OR (2) We can calmly turn our heads back into the water, use whatever air remains in our lungs to casually cough out the water, and continue swimming as if nothing happened.

Of course, this ability to casually brush off breathing water only comes with significant experience in the water, something only swimmers can brag about.

Based upon this, you now have an answer to the following question: Besides great physical ability, a strong heart, a killer physique, an enjoyable hour at the gym, engaging competitions, and good camaraderie, what has swimming ever done for you? Excellent control over the choking reflex, of course.

funkyfish
December 4th, 2007, 04:15 PM
I've found that for me, the "breathing water" issue happens more when I swim backstroke and get water up my nose. Pretty interesting observation though.:banana:

Slowswim
December 4th, 2007, 05:00 PM
I've found that for me, the "breathing water" issue happens more when I swim backstroke and get water up my nose. Pretty interesting observation though.:banana:

Ditto. I've found I can drink amazing amounts of water through my nose.:shakeshead: Its the burning behind my eyes I hate.:frustrated:

3strokes
December 4th, 2007, 09:29 PM
One good way I've found that eliminates the probability of "inhaling" a sudden wave in freestyle is that I have always inhaled with my mouth in the trough created by my forward motion. Even at modest speeds, this motion will create enough of a trough that your mouth can be below the
water level but in an air-pocket. The body roll is enough that no further twisting of the neck or head is necessary.

Surfsalterpath
December 4th, 2007, 11:14 PM
also,

have you noticed that when you do get that "bit of sucking water" .... right after you recover from the scare you feel like you are swimming w/ more power and authority?

...must be that adrenal gland release :)