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Sports Medicine Blog


Information shared here is not intended to be a substitute for professional or medical advice on personal health matters. For personal medical advice, or if you are concerned about a medical condition or injury, please see your healthcare provider for evaluation and care.

  1. Better Diet, Better Brain

    A study published in June 2018, The Rotterdam Study, showed that a better quality diet is related to larger brain tissue. This can have an impact on an aging brain and the risk for dementia. Brains do tend to shrink with age. However, a diet high in vegetables, fruit, whole grains, nuts, dairy, and fish and a low intake of sugar-containing beverages was associated with larger brain volumes.
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  2. Diet and Cognitive Function

    by , September 21st, 2015 at 07:16 PM (Sports Medicine Blog)
    Scientific American posted a very good article on the Mediterranean diet, the MIND diet, and cognitive function. The article explains some of the difficulties in doing whole diet research on humans. The article goes on to explain how the MIND diet is a variation of the Mediterranean diet that would be easier for Americans to adhere to. If you're interested in this topic, I would suggest following this link: http://www.scientificamerican.com/ar...for-the-brain/
  3. Optimal Brain Function and Exercise

    by , September 14th, 2015 at 07:16 PM (Sports Medicine Blog)
    PLOSOne published a study on the effects of exercise on cognition in individuals older than 65 year. 100 sedentary individuals with no cognitive deficits and who were not insulin-dependent diabetics, had no significant hearing or visual problems, and no major cardiorespiratory or musculoskeletal impairments in the last two years, were recruited for the study. They were then randomized to either no intervention, 75, 150, or 225 minutes of semi-supervised aerobic exercise per week. The study was conducted over a 26 week period of time. Over the course of the intervention, those who exercised had improved cardiorespiratory fitness, with those exercising longer and more intensely having the greatest benefit. All the exercise groups improved their attention span and their visuospatial processing, with more intense exercise having more benefit. Those who adhered to the protocols saw more improvement than those who didn't. An individual's cardiorespiratory fitness at the end of the study was the best predictor of cognitive gains.
    This study is interesting because it was prospective: they all started out the same, and those that exercised improved compared to those who didn't. It is also interesting because even those in the 75 minutes per week group showed improvement. However, more was better.