Blog Comments

  1. pwb's Avatar
    Or, you can just give up on grass and go with desert landscaping (e.g., rocks and cacti) like we have in Arizona. I removed my grass and all my non-native plants from my backyard in 2010 when I put in my pool. Despite putting in a much larger pool than the play pool I had, my water usage has gone DOWN dramatically since I don't have to water the grass and don't have to water any of the cacti. I have a few citrus trees that take a bit of water, but, other than that, only my pool requires water. The net effect is lower water usage and a better pool. On top of that, the cacti require practically zero maintenance.
  2. StewartACarroll's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by thewookiee
    A couple of things to consider when seeding/sodding. 1) A lot of bermuda grass is not shade tolerant. I don't know the kind you have planted. The last few years, there have been more shade tolerant brands come on the market, but bermuda really likes full sun.

    A couple of thoughts to help with the new sodding as well.

    1) Have you checked you ph levels? If the soil ph is below 6.0 or above 7.0(neutral) grass has a difficult time surviving due to key nutrients being restricted or locked-up all together. I would take several samples, 10-12 from around the area that you are sodding. Mix them into one bag and get the level tested.

    Odds are that you will need to add lime. You may not though. Soils in southeast Tennessee are very poor, so liming is always needed here

    2) As you are laying the sod or just after you have layed it, add humic acid. Humic acid is a natural organic product that really aids in root germination. You will need to water it really well, but it will be worth doing so.

    Check with the Texas A&M turf grass science website to find the best watering recommendations for your area. A&M has a great turf science department. Most of the time, people water daily but only for a few minutes. This will cause the roots to turn-up and grow towards the surface, instead of making them grow down in the soil.


    You may have already thought of all these ideas, but I thought I would share them. Again, check with the A&M department or your local extension office for any advice.
    Great advice. We did not check the ph since everything else seems to do well except this shady area, but it is shady because it's surrounded by trees which obviously will affect the soil ph. I will definately take your advice. We tend to deep water our grass and plants and water less frequently.

    I will ill check out the A&M office. My wife is looking at Master Gardening classes and these are offered through A&M so they really are a great resource. A big thanks for the great advice I will definitely take it on board.
  3. thewookiee's Avatar
    A couple of things to consider when seeding/sodding. 1) A lot of bermuda grass is not shade tolerant. I don't know the kind you have planted. The last few years, there have been more shade tolerant brands come on the market, but bermuda really likes full sun.

    A couple of thoughts to help with the new sodding as well.

    1) Have you checked you ph levels? If the soil ph is below 6.0 or above 7.0(neutral) grass has a difficult time surviving due to key nutrients being restricted or locked-up all together. I would take several samples, 10-12 from around the area that you are sodding. Mix them into one bag and get the level tested.

    Odds are that you will need to add lime. You may not though. Soils in southeast Tennessee are very poor, so liming is always needed here

    2) As you are laying the sod or just after you have layed it, add humic acid. Humic acid is a natural organic product that really aids in root germination. You will need to water it really well, but it will be worth doing so.

    Check with the Texas A&M turf grass science website to find the best watering recommendations for your area. A&M has a great turf science department. Most of the time, people water daily but only for a few minutes. This will cause the roots to turn-up and grow towards the surface, instead of making them grow down in the soil.


    You may have already thought of all these ideas, but I thought I would share them. Again, check with the A&M department or your local extension office for any advice.
  4. __steve__'s Avatar
    Thanks pwb, this will be the "drill pool"
  5. pwb's Avatar
    Turn this stupid pool design into a positive and practice your open water sighting skills to look for the wall each lap!
  6. StewartACarroll's Avatar
    Yes it is a good description of how middle and long distance swimming feels when done right. Today was a more uncomfortably uncomfortable day!
  7. gull's Avatar
    Nice swim! I really like those splits. Have you thought about competing in the 1500?
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