Blog Comments

  1. Chris Shaw's Avatar
    I have been in a 6 mo + training cycle with few rest periods. With that said; I find warm wears me out. Anything over 800; depending on the day. I typically get a good mix loosen and a desc pre set in. That typically does it for me...thx god i get a rest day tomorrow.
  2. jbs's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by The Fortress
    If only I liked milk! I wonder if there are any studies where there is more protein than the conventional 4:1 ratio ...

    I've read the same thing about eating more earlier in the day. I'm not the best at this; I stay up late and get hungry late.
    There must be studies that deal with that. How else would they have known to come up with the 4:1? Surely, they did some studies with different ratios? I also wonder if it matters whether you drink or eat the carbs/protein.

    As a night owl myself, I have the same problem. I've been trying a little harder since I read that -- with limited success.
  3. pwb's Avatar
    Does anybody think warm up is fatiguing and amounts to garbage yards?
    No to both. I really like warmup. At my little 'swim camp' this past weekend, we talked about thinking about it as a 'tune up' so that you're thinking both about tuning the technique and the body/cardio to get ready for whatever goals you have for the rest of the practice. It's semantics, but that added some value for me. I adopted an idea that Dave Salo had in his book awhile back of doing very close to the same tuneup every time I get in the water; I'm not always 100% the same, but the routine of doing largely the same thing (with some key focal points) helps me assess where I am each day.
  4. The Fortress's Avatar
    If only I liked milk! I wonder if there are any studies where there is more protein than the conventional 4:1 ratio ...

    I've read the same thing about eating more earlier in the day. I'm not the best at this; I stay up late and get hungry late.
  5. jbs's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by The Fortress
    I know quantity is important, but I thought timing could be relevant. For example, aren't there studies showing that, to help speed recovery, you should ingest protein 30-60 minutes after working out?
    There are studies of endurance athletes that show quicker recovery when the athletes eat a mixture of carbohydrates and protein within 30-60 minutes after workout. I think the ratio is supposed to be 4 to 1 -- which is incidentally the same ratio that's in chocolate milk. Here's a link to a report of a study that was focused on chocolate milk:

    http://www.nsca.com/education/articl...ecovery-drink/

    Of course, the referenced study was focused on endurance athletes performing multiple sessions.

    There have also been a recent study that suggest that if you have two people eating the same amount of calories, but one eats more earlier in the day while the other eats more later in the day, the one who eats later in the day is more likely to be heavier. But I've only seen a reporter's take on one study and didn't look that closely at it, so who knows.
  6. jaadams1's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by The Fortress
    Ew! 1500 (or so) calories from junk food. Nutrition is even more important as you age. One day, you'll have to change your ways or pay the price. At least you're getting a lot of exercise working on your house!
    I talk the talk a lot, but don't walk it very often. Fast food is good and I like it, but I tend to keep it on the more healthy side (more healthy than my mother-in-law's cooking at least!!)
  7. The Fortress's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by jaadams1
    That's where a Triple Whopper from Burger King comes in handy.
    Ew! 1500 (or so) calories from junk food. Nutrition is even more important as you age. One day, you'll have to change your ways or pay the price. At least you're getting a lot of exercise working on your house!
  8. The Fortress's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Jazz Hands
    The timing is irrelevant; it's quantity.
    I know quantity is important, but I thought timing could be relevant. For example, aren't there studies showing that, to help speed recovery, you should ingest protein 30-60 minutes after working out?
  9. jaadams1's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Jazz Hands
    The timing is irrelevant; it's quantity.
    That's where a Triple Whopper from Burger King comes in handy.
  10. Jazz Hands's Avatar
    The timing is irrelevant; it's quantity.
  11. The Fortress's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Jazz Hands
    Nutrition is the sum of everything you eat, not just one snack a day.
    Oh, I know. I eat pretty healthy. I was just wondering if a late night infusion of protein might help with recovery.
  12. The Fortress's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by ourswimmer
    Dunno about the protein shakes, although I do eat a fair amount of protein, but I am a convert on the massages. During heavy training I see my body worker at least every 3 weeks, or more frequently if I can work it into my and her schedule. She works with a lot of professional and serious amateur overhead athletes (rock climbers, baseball players, swimmers), so she really knows shoulders. I credit her entirely with beating my nagging "little league" elbow. She also keeps my neck and shoulders fully mobile despite my cervical fusion, which helps me out a lot at work (desk job with some driving) as well as in the pool. Good luck with this new person in Pittsburgh.
    I could probably eat a chicken breast too!

    I haven't had a massage in 5 weeks and I can really feel it. I'm going to aim for every 2-3. Sounds like you have the perfect person.
  13. The Fortress's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Jazz Hands;
    Oh, and P2Life looks like sugary garbage. First rule of supplements: 99% are a waste of your money.
    Also very low in actual protein … and definitely a lot of calories … Don't worry -- I don't own any.
  14. Jazz Hands's Avatar
    Oh, and P2Life looks like sugary garbage. First rule of supplements: 99% are a waste of your money.
  15. Jazz Hands's Avatar
    I'm going to try having a protein shake before bedtime to see if that has any effect.
    Nutrition is the sum of everything you eat, not just one snack a day.
  16. ourswimmer's Avatar
    Dunno about the protein shakes, although I do eat a fair amount of protein, but I am a convert on the massages. During heavy training I see my body worker at least every 3 weeks, or more frequently if I can work it into my and her schedule. She works with a lot of professional and serious amateur overhead athletes (rock climbers, baseball players, swimmers), so she really knows shoulders. I credit her entirely with beating my nagging "little league" elbow. She also keeps my neck and shoulders fully mobile despite my cervical fusion, which helps me out a lot at work (desk job with some driving) as well as in the pool. Good luck with this new person in Pittsburgh.
  17. Jazz Hands's Avatar
    3x75 or 4x75 was pretty typical for me. Or, like, 75+25 with short rest.
  18. The Fortress's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Jazz Hands
    So, yeah, that kind of training is brutal. The studies are very short-lived and they are not looking at burnout or overtraining.

    Also, remember 50s are shorter than 30 seconds for you or me, so it's even worse than doing 50s. For burn sets I used to do 75s. I would also do kick and pull sets, which I felt were less psychologically taxing but still produced effects in more isolated muscle groups. This was back in 2009 when I was training for Clovis. I had a good season, with maybe some symptoms of overtraining by the end of it.
    75s all out? How many?

    With my fairly crappy training since last June, I haven't really done any burn sets.
  19. Jazz Hands's Avatar
    So, yeah, that kind of training is brutal. The studies are very short-lived and they are not looking at burnout or overtraining.

    Also, remember 50s are shorter than 30 seconds for you or me, so it's even worse than doing 50s. For burn sets I used to do 75s. I would also do kick and pull sets, which I felt were less psychologically taxing but still produced effects in more isolated muscle groups. This was back in 2009 when I was training for Clovis. I had a good season, with maybe some symptoms of overtraining by the end of it.
  20. The Fortress's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Jazz Hands

    http://blog.sme.sk/blog/3928/155928/...ining_2008.pdf
    http://jp.physoc.org/content/586/1/151.long

    The procotol there is 30s all-out followed by 4m30s rest. I imagine this is pretty exhausting, and I would guess fatigue is related to the mechanism of adaptation. But the authors don't seem particular interested in that, for some reason. They don't measure lactate or power during the training itself, and they haven't done experiments manipulating fatigue.
    I like to do all out 50s on 5:00, but I can't imagine doing it for 40-60 minutes. I would likely be pretty flattened the next day. Too many reps is not exactly sprinter material.

    Interesting that the first sentence of the study is what Rushall focuses on -- oxidative capacity. Contrary to this study, Rushall theorizes that you achieve this by bypassing the anaerobic system and using the ATP and aerobic systems instead.
    Updated January 12th, 2014 at 11:48 AM by The Fortress