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  1. Club Categories & Relay Starts

    by , May 4th, 2018 at 07:17 PM (Rules Committee Blog)
    At Nationals, why are there two club categories?

    At the USMS National Championship Meet, clubs are scored in two categories: Regional Clubs and Local Clubs. The designation is found in the meet program. Regional clubs are clubs that are made up of subgroups or workout groups. Local clubs are clubs that have decided not to have separate workout groups or subgroups so they represent their club at the National Championship Meet. Your club designation is determined by your club and LMSC. Some workout groups decide to join a regional club, which might include workout groups from an entire city or LMSC. As for scoring at local LMSC swim meets, the meet hosts determine whether they are going to be scored by workout groups/subgroups or by regional clubs. Members always compete for your club, not your workout group and results going into the national database is always designated as your club, not your workout group. However, as terms of scoring at local LMSC swim meets, the meet host determine whether they are going to be scored by workout groups/subgroups or by regional clubs. More information about local and regional clubs can be found in the USMS rule book 104.5.6 Club Scoring. For USMS Spring Nationals in May there are currently 251 local clubs registered (including individuals who are unattached) and 19 regional clubs. Championship banners are presented to the top 10 clubs in the local division and top five clubs in the regional division.

    Relay Starts with Adjustable Back Plates on the Starting Platform

    Article 101.7.3 H is a rule that was added this year to the rule book. It states that the relay swimmers in the second, third, and fourth position cannot start from the top of the adjustable back plate (wedge). The first swimmer is bound by normal forward or backward start rules. The swimmers must have at lest part of one foot in contact with the starting platform (not on back plate/wedge) in front of the back plate. This rule was put in partly for safety reasons, to prevent relay swimmers from moving the back plate/wedge all the way to the front of the block and taking off from just the wedge. When doing a relay start, the wedge can be placed as far forward as you would like as long as part of your foot touches the part of the block facing the water before take-off. Only one foot has to touch the front part of the platform so the other foot can remain on the back plate/wedge. Also, the foot that touches the front part of the platform does not have to start in that position. When the start has begun, the foot may begin in any position, however, it must touch the front part of the platform before take-off.
  2. On the Road (November-December 2010)

    by , November 1st, 2010 at 12:00 AM (SWIMMER Editorials)
    This fall, I had the extreme good fortune to travel and meet USMS members and coaches in the San Francisco Bay Area and surrounding communities. Each club has a unique flavor and each coach a different style. All were amazing. In speaking with the coaches and swimmers, I learned more about what makes our sport so special. During November, look for video interviews with swimmers and coaches from these clubs on our YouTube channel, at youtube.com/USMastersSwimming.

    First stop was the Marin Pirates Masters, with Head Coach Cokie Lepinski and Assistant Coach Susie Powell. They brought a basket of Finis Tempo Trainers to the pool and we did the entire workout with them. The kick sets left my legs feeling quite rubbery, but the enthusiasm level was palpable and infectious—we had a great time.

    The next day was with the Los Altos Mountain View Masters. Coach Jose Bonpua had both age group and Masters in the pool. While I swam in a designated Masters lane, he kept a sharp eye on me. When I thought he wasn’t looking and backed off a little, he encouraged me to drop to an interval I often avoid at my home pool. His attention made me feel like one of the kids, which, at 46, is a lot of fun.

    Courtside Club, a tennis and sports resort in Los Gatos, has its own registered USMS club. Their coach, Dave Meck, normally coaches age groupers in Santa Clara, but zips over to Courtside to coach Masters as well. Most of the swimmers there don’t compete in meets, but their solid commitment to fitness, fun and their coach was evident.

    The Strawberry Canyon Aquatic Masters practice at Cal Berkeley, whose aquatics director, Danksi Perez, also swims on the team. She spoke of a sense of community in the swimming world and how much having a team and structured practices means to her. SCAM had lanes to accommodate every level of swimmer, with printed workouts for each lane and Assistant Coach Jeremy Cohen manning the deck.

    Next stop was inland, due east. At Davis Aquatic Masters, I arrived just in time to find out that it was sprint backstroke week there—anathema to a distance breaststroker—but I persevered and learned more about the stroke I love to hate. Head Coach Stu Kahn welcomed his group with a video of Aaron Peirsol looped on a poolside TV cart, and instructions on what to pay attention to in the video and in the water during the main set.

    Lastly, another Marin County team, North Bay Aquatics, welcomed me to their Saturday morning workout at a local high school. Assistant Coach Michael Sugrue kept me honest as my stroke fell apart on a descending set that I started too quickly.

    Special thanks to all the coaches and swimmers I met for embodying the spirit of USMS and providing great Masters swimming experiences in their communities.

    Updated July 1st, 2014 at 10:54 AM by Editor

    Tags: clubs, coaches, travel
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