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swimsuit addict

More pool tourism

Rating: 2 votes, 5.00 average.
To mark the end of summer we had a final outing of the pool tourism club—this time to the Red Hook pool in Brooklyn. It’s another of the 10 NYC public pools originally opened in 1936, and has similar dimensions to the 100 pool I swam in on Thursday—this one is 330’ x 130’, with a maximum depth of 4’. It also features those odd pyramids sprouting up in the middle of the pool. After our swim today, I noticed a 1950s-era picture of the pool in the lobby that showed these as circular ledges that bathers could sit or stand on, and jump or dive from—I think they were topped with pyramids sometime since then for safety’s sake.

Getting to the Red Hook pool isn’t straightforward—there are no subway stops right near there—but it has become easier since an IKEA store opened on the Red Hook waterfront several years ago. Today I was able to take a Water Taxi ferry from lower Manhattan to the IKEA store, then walk several blocks to the pool from there. On the way I saw a sign for a cow crossing—not something you see every day here in the city.




The good thing about Red Hook is that there are designated lap swim lanes set up all day long. At most city pools you have to hit the morning or evening lap swim hours if you want to actually swim. At Red Hook the lanes are set up the short way, so each length is about 40 meters long, rather than 100m. There are no lane lines, so swimmers tend to regard the black lines on the bottom as lane dividers, and circle swim between rather than around them. My group of 4 shared a lane with a couple of other polite swimmers for most of our session. Here’s what we did:

400 mcm (medium-course-meters) warmup

80 dolphin dives
80 breaststroke

80 one-armed fly, alternating arms
40 fly
40 one-armed fly, alternating arms
40 FR with dolphin kick
40 BK with dolphin kick
40 corkscrew with dolphin kick

40 breaststroke, alternating 3 strokes w/ dolphin kicks 3 w/BR kick
40 twirly breaststroke
80 BK/BR

320 FR catch’em swim (swim until first swimmer catches last)

(I’m probably leaving out about 4 x 40 other drills/play I can’t remember)

320 warmdown
80 dolphin dives

Then we got out, visited the sprinkler area (those were cold—no wonder no kids were playing in them!), then got dressed and headed over to the food trucks.

As wonderful as the pool was, the food trucks were actually what drew me to today’s outing—my friends had been exclaiming over the pupusas they ate out here since last summer. We found the right truck, and I ordered a couple. Pupusas are filled cornbread treat, and ours were served with a red cabbage slaw. I went for the plantain-cheese and the chicken varieties, and both were wonderful. A strawberry shake completed the food-truck feast. If triathlons were composed of swimming, eating, and napping, that would be my sport.

It was a beautiful day and a fun outing with friends. I was glad to get in a final outdoor pool swim to celebrate the end of a nice summer.

My last two outings have allowed me to add a couple more pools to my NYC list--here's the updated version (and thanks to pwb for the idea!):

New York City pools I’ve swum at (asterisked = outdoor pool):

Manhattan
1. West Side Y (25 yd), W. 63rd between Bway and Central Park West
2. West Side Y warm-water pool (20 yd?)
3. Riverbank State Park indoor pool (50M), W. 138th Street on the Hudson
*4. Riverbank State Park outdoor pool (25yds)
5. Asphalt Green competition pool (50M), E. 91st and York
6. Asphalt Green warm-water therapy pool (15m?)
*7. Asphalt Green outdoor pool (25yd, now gone)
8. John Jay College Pool (25y) 59th and 10th
9. Baruch College Pool (25m) 24th and Lex
10. City College pool (25y) W 145th and Convent Ave.
11. Columbia University (25y) 116th and Bway
12. NYU Palladium pool (25y x 25m) 140 E. 14th St.
13. Vanderbilt YMCA (25y) 224 E. 47th
14. Chelsea Rec Center (25y) W 25th between 9th and 10th
15. New York Athletic Club (25y) Central Park South @ 7th Ave.
*16. John Jay Park Pool (48y) E. 77th and York
*17. Hamilton Fish park pool (50m) Pitt and Houston Streets
18. Reebok Club pool (25y) 67th and Columbus
19. Chelsea Piers (25y), W. 19th Street on the Hudson
20. JJC pool (25y), 76th and Amsterdam
21. Manhattan Plaza (25y), 43rd and 10th

Brooklyn
1. LIU—Brooklyn (25y) Flatbush and DeKalb
2. St. Francis College pool (25y) Brooklyn Heights
*3. Red Hook Pool (40m)

Bronx
1. Lehman College pool (50m)
*2. Van Cortlandt Park pool (50m)
*3. Corona Park Pool (100m)

Queens
1. Flushing Meadows Corona Park pool (50m)

Staten Island
1. Wagner College pool (25y?)
*2. Lyons pool (50m)

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Comments

  1. jaadams1's Avatar
    On the way I saw a sign for a cow crossing—not something you see every day here in the city
    We don't even have signs anything like that around here, and I see cows/horses/other forms of livestock all the time when we leave the area for trips.
    The "deer crossing" signs (and the "children playing" signs) around here don't seem to help much at all either. They both seems to run out across the roads at full speed without regard to anything coming down the road!!
  2. swimsuit addict's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by jaadams1
    We don't even have signs anything like that around here, and I see cows/horses/other forms of livestock all the time when we leave the area for trips.
    The "deer crossing" signs (and the "children playing" signs) around here don't seem to help much at all either. They both seems to run out across the roads at full speed without regard to anything coming down the road!!
    Yeah, we don't have signs like that in rural Alabama either, although you see plenty of cows (but none crossing the road unless they've somehow broken through their fences)! And I was pretty taken aback to see one in Red Hook, which was once an industrial waterfront area and still has abandoned warehouses and such. It turns out that it marks the Red Hook Community Farm, which is a large vegetable garden that was made by dumping a layer of topsoil atop an abandoned concrete playground. They have a weekly farm market and also sell CSA shares to anyone willing to make weekly pickups in Red Hook. (I don't think they actually have cows, but they're apparently thinking big for the future!)
  3. couldbebetterfly's Avatar
    "If triathlons were composed of swimming, eating, and napping, that would be my sport."


    Yes indeed!