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Elise's Fitness Fun

Is strength in the weight room indicative of ..........

Rating: 2 votes, 5.00 average.
O.k. I still haven't figured out if I am better suited for the sprints or endurance events. I wonder if strength in the weight room (or lack thereof) is indicative of the type of swimmer I am. I mean, aren't sprinters going to be naturally stronger in the weight room than distance swimmers? Isn't it unusual for distance swimmers (even middle distance swimmers) to have the power and strength of sprinters?

Given my age and that I'm female, I really have no idea if I am all that strong. I have nothing to compare myself to and can't seem to find studies or tests indicating what the average woman might lift or even what the average masters female swimmer my age might lift.

My inclination is to figure that I might be below average on what a female masters swimmer my age might lift and average for a woman. So, should this fact speak to what events I should concentrate on?

Below is the workout I did today. Still a little weak from last week, but at least I'm getting my strength back.

One mile run on treadmill

Bench press: 2 sets of 85 x 8
Lat pull-downs: 100 x 10, 120 x 8, 140 x 6
Military press: 10 x 35, 8 x 50, 6 x 65
Hammer curls: 2 sets of 10 x 10

Core work:
1 set of 50 crunches legs on Swiss ball
1 set of 50 bicycle crunches

Ankle work:
3 sets of toes to front toe raises, 3 sets of feet turned out toe raises, 3 sets of feet turned in toe raises

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Updated April 8th, 2009 at 03:25 AM by elise526

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Comments

  1. qbrain's Avatar
    You don't look weak to me based on what you did today in the gym.

    A strong person is going to be better at both sprints and distance, all other things being equal, compared to a weak person. I am not a strong believer in natural talent, but I do believe that we tend to excel at what we enjoy.
  2. The Fortress's Avatar
    I wonder what % of 40+ women even lift?

    From what I can tell from the cross section of 30-50ish women at my gym, you are strong for your age. I would guess strong for a swimmer too. I only see a couple other women at my gym lifting around what I do.

    I seem to recall Paul Smith writing a bunch of criteria to determine if you're a sprinter on some thread awhile ago ... Can't remember what they all were now. Age! I think a couple were vertical leap and time for recovery.
  3. elise526's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by qbrain
    You don't look weak to me based on what you did today in the gym.

    A strong person is going to be better at both sprints and distance, all other things being equal, compared to a weak person. I am not a strong believer in natural talent, but I do believe that we tend to excel at what we enjoy.
    Thanks, qbrain. Your logic is dead-on. I do wonder, however, if we are more inclined to like those things that come easier to us.
  4. elise526's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by The Fortress
    I wonder what % of 40+ women even lift?

    From what I can tell from the cross section of 30-50ish women at my gym, you are strong for your age. I would guess strong for a swimmer too. I only see a couple other women at my gym lifting around what I do.

    I seem to recall Paul Smith writing a bunch of criteria to determine if you're a sprinter on some thread awhile ago ... Can't remember what they all were now. Age! I think a couple were vertical leap and time for recovery.
    Well, I'm kind of surprised that I would be considered strong in the upper-body for a swimmer. Of course, as I said, I would really have no way to know.

    I may have to ask Paul to pull up that thread again. I wonder what would be a good vertical jump for a woman my age. I'm assuming that it would change somewhat with age.
  5. quicksilver's Avatar
    I wonder what % of 40+ women even lift?
    Masters swimmers might be the very few female (adult) athletes who are serious about the gym.


    I tried to research this on Google.
    The only thing women over 40 seem to be lifting are their faces and boobs.
  6. The Fortress's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by elise526
    Well, I'm kind of surprised that I would be considered strong in the upper-body for a swimmer. Of course, as I said, I would really have no way to know.
    Everyone is working out in secret!

    From what I understand by word of mouth, my sprint competitors are lifting. And it certainly looks like it. However, I would probably agree that not as many distance swimmers are lifting. Or people are doing yoga/pilates instead. Or boobs and faces.
  7. elise526's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by quicksilver
    Masters swimmers might be the very few female (adult) athletes who are serious about the gym.


    I tried to research this on Google.
    The only thing women over 40 seem to be lifting are their faces and boobs.
    Haha. So true, although I think on the boobs, women are lifting and adding. I've never understood the boob job thing unless somebody has had to have a masectomy or is completely flat.

    Why would a woman want to attract more men who value her for her silicone instead of her brain? I have a friend who is 5'8" and weighed 120. She literally looked like a Barbie doll and her boobs were real - DD mind you. I told her that she ought to go around and do what all the nutty women do when they get a boob job, but instead say, "You see these? They are real."
  8. elise526's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by The Fortress
    Everyone is working out in secret!

    From what I understand by word of mouth, my sprint competitors are lifting. And it certainly looks like it. However, I would probably agree that not as many distance swimmers are lifting. Or people are doing yoga/pilates instead. Or boobs and faces.
    I'm almost afraid I would get injured when I swam a race if I didn't lift. My chiro told me something interesting a few months ago. He said that because I started lifting weights at a young age (14) and had been a flyer, my muscles were more likely to be better developed than most women in the shoulder area and hence more stable. I'll keep my fingers crossed.
  9. quicksilver's Avatar
    They say that weight training will stave off any potential shoulder injuries.

    My first few years back in the pool were accompanied by a terrible clicking sound in one shoulder.
    It went away as soon as the dryland became part of the weekly routine.

    And yes, the only thing worse than the ninnies who go overboard with the fake body parts are the men who encourage having it done.
    Boobs for boobs.

    Nice avatar elise. The real one is even better. Talk about intimidating the competition!
  10. elise526's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by quicksilver
    They say that weight training will stave off any potential shoulder injuries.

    My first few years back in the pool were accompanied by a terrible clicking sound in one shoulder.
    It went away as soon as the dryland became part of the weekly routine.

    And yes, the only thing worse than the ninnies who go overboard with the fake body parts are the men who encourage having it done.
    Boobs for boobs.

    Nice avatar elise. The real one is even better. Talk about intimidating the competition!
    Thanks, quicksilver!

    That clicking sound you had sounds scary. Glad it went away!

    Haha - I like that - "boobs for boobs."
  11. ViveBene's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by quicksilver
    They say that weight training will stave off any potential shoulder injuries.

    My first few years back in the pool were accompanied by a terrible clicking sound in one shoulder.
    It went away as soon as the dryland became part of the weekly routine.
    Aha. Light bulb of recognition. Recently my shoulder apparatus started clicking on the backstroke. Guess I'll have to stop by the weight room instead of dashing merrily through it.