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The FAF AFAP Digest

Thursday, April 11

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Swim/SCY/Solo:

Warm up/Transition:

600 various
4 x 50 front scull w/agility paddles @ :15 RI
4 x 50 free w/agility paddles, EVF emphasis @ 1:00
50 EZ
8 x 25 burst + cruise @ 1:00
100 EZ

Main Sets:

Did a slightly modified version of the main hypoxic/speed set from Workout #1 of Week #14 from the HIT forum, including 24 shooters: http://forums.usms.org/showthread.ph...k-14-April-1-7.

w/fins:
8 x 25 back shooters @ :40 + :20 extra rest
1 x 100 fast free @ 90% w/agility paddles, :55
200 EZ

6 x 25 right side shooters @ :40 + :40 extra rest
1 x 100 fast IM @ 95%, broken @ 25s for :10, :51
200 EZ

4 x 25 belly shooters @ :40 + :40 extra rest
1 x AFAP 50 breast, :28
100 EZ

2 x 25 shooters @ :40 + :20 extra rest
1 x broken AFAP 50 dolphin kick w/board, :10 rest @ 25 (11-12s)
100 EZ

4 x through:
1 x 25 shooter @ :40, no extra rest
1 x 25 AFAP free, no breath (10s)
100 EZ

100 EZ

Total: 3400


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I was pretty beat today from yesterday's weights. Still managed some decent times. But was battling calf cramps the entire workout. Need to book a massage; I've just been too preoccupied.

Our structural engineer is at the house now evaluating our foundation. Hopefully, my stress level will go down after that. Trying not to get too worked up over this issue, but I really think the buyers intentionally did this to screw with the price. The wife who I detest was nattering on about how she is an "expert" in moving/buying houses (and should "create an app" -- rolls eyes). Well, good luck to them finding another beautiful old house with a pool, guest house and summer swim club membership. There aren't any in this school district or any others close by.

Edit: Our engineer says our foundation is structurally sound. There is one wall near the basement exit that has some water damage/crumbling that could be repaired. But it might not even be a problem for many years, hence we don't really need to repair it or comp them the money. He thought we were in very good shape for an old house. Glad we got our own consult. Now at least we are in a better position to negotiate.

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Updated April 11th, 2013 at 04:49 PM by The Fortress

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Swim Workouts

Comments

  1. swimmieAvsFan's Avatar
    That's good to hear regarding the foundation. Have fun negotiating with them- I doubt they realize tenacity and intelligence they're up against
  2. The Fortress's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by swimmieAvsFan
    That's good to hear regarding the foundation. Have fun negotiating with them- I doubt they realize tenacity and intelligence they're up against
    I'm sure they don't. But trust me, the wife is a pit bull with a business degree from Kellogg. It won't be easy unless they decide to be cooperative to get the house. At least the brokers do the back and forth. Even if we get over this hurdle, there is the appraisal. I just want things to happen fast because the spring market is right now ...
  3. poolraat's Avatar
    It's sounds like they really want the house (and goodies it comes with), but want to find a way to get it for less than you're asking or the offer they initially made. If they want the house that bad, you can use that to your advantage!
  4. The Fortress's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by poolraat
    It's sounds like they really want the house (and goodies it comes with), but want to find a way to get it for less than you're asking or the offer they initially made. If they want the house that bad, you can use that to your advantage!
    Yes, that's pretty much my take. However, the wife made a point of saying in front of me that she "told her daughter not to get emotionally invested in the house because there can be things wrong." I just did a Zillow search and there is not much available in our price range in our school pyramid (where her kids currently are). Nothing remotely like our house.
  5. poolraat's Avatar
    Based on your engineer's findings I think you've got the upper hand. And she probably said that to try to make you believe the house and location are not that important to them. Just be patient.
  6. The Fortress's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by poolraat
    Based on your engineer's findings I think you've got the upper hand. And she probably said that to try to make you believe the house and location are not that important to them. Just be patient.
    Oh yes, I'm sure she was sending me a message. She's not a subtle person. She kept going on about her SF Victorian. I considered saying, "this is not SF; we don't live on the fault line." But I thought it would be wiser to say nothing and let the agents work it out. Their engineer's report is due today, so we'll be able to see how much discrepancy there is between the two.
  7. poolraat's Avatar
    It will be interesting to see what her engineer finds. If he can also do the repair work I would think there's definitely a conflict as his findings will be pointed toward generating income through the repair work. Is he licensed as both a structural engineer and a contractor? Check with your state's licensing boards.
  8. The Fortress's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by poolraat
    It will be interesting to see what her engineer finds. If he can also do the repair work I would think there's definitely a conflict as his findings will be pointed toward generating income through the repair work. Is he licensed as both a structural engineer and a contractor? Check with your state's licensing boards.
    I'm not entirely positive about the name on their truck, but I think it's this company: http://www.soilandstructure.com/. If so, they definitely look like a contractor.

    Our engineer only does inspections, so has no conflict.
  9. ourswimmer's Avatar
    You may have other reasons for your opinion of the buyers, but on just the facts you have given here I think you can cut them some slack (which does not mean you have to sell the house to them cheap!). I have owned two houses in that age range in the Bay Area, and in the course of buying and selling those I have seen a lot more. Some of them are on brand-new, state-of-the-art foundations, and others are propped up on stacks of crumbly bricks with paint stirring sticks wedged here and there to make the stacks even. (I got out of that crawl space in a hurry!) Some have up-to-date electrical systems that can handle the full suite of modern electrical appliances including multiple computers, TVs, etc.; others have 1930s-era knob-and-tube wiring that will blow all the fuses in the house every time you open the refrigerator if the radio also is on. And the soundness or modernity of these systems has little relationship to how well-maintained the house seems when you look at the floors, windows, paint, yard, neighborhood, etc.

    If your house is priced accurately for the kind of house it is, both on its outside and its inside, then you or your agent can just smile blandly and nod when they say, "we will have to spend $XXX for these systems." The market takes the typical blemishes into account, and you need to haggle only if your house really does turn out to have some unexpected problem that you think other buyers also would fear. Good luck with this next part!
  10. The Fortress's Avatar
    Thanks for you comments. I think I was completely thrown off by the whole issue. I anticipated having no problems on the home inspection -- there is not much 1920s about the house except the foundation (and original period charm details). New wiring, computers & TVs abound, wifi, new windows, new slate roof, etc. We now have a report from our own structural engineer saying the foundation is structurally sound, though there are some minor issues that might need to be dealt with in the future. To me, that should be good enough for the buyers. If they want to improve the foundation, they can do so.

    Our main concern wrt selling the house has always been pitching a Victorian when the DC metro area is almost uniformly center hall colonials with beige wall paint.

    We've gotten conflicting comments ranging from "tell them to take it as is" to "your first offer is your best offer." Right now, they haven't produced their own report. Hopefully, it can be worked out.
  11. knelson's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by The Fortress
    Our main concern wrt selling the house has always been pitching a Victorian when the DC metro area is almost uniformly center hall colonials with beige wall paint.
    Of course this could be a big plus for your house. People looking for something a little different.
  12. The Fortress's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by knelson
    Of course this could be a big plus for your house. People looking for something a little different.
    Yes, it could work out that way too. And these buyers are looking for something different. Most people in NOVA, though, want the huge kitchen and huge attached two story family room. And that feature doesn't come with a 1920s Victorian.