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Sunday, April 14

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I was dead today from deep tissue + yesterday's all day gardening session. So I just hopped in and went 1650 EZ.

We definitely had crazy buyers. When they found out we hired our own engineer, in a huff, they signed releases to the K based on their guy's report. Then they submitted an email detailing repairs they wanted and were in another huff when they found we had put the house back on the market. I'm not sure they even read our engineer's report or his rebuttal of their engineer Their engineer (who we guess may not be one since the report wasn't stamped) thought we should do things like rip up 1920s floors to make the joists closer and rip out walls to put in copper piping for one drain that was in perfect working order. The report was basically a wish list of structural upgrades. And they attempted to outright lie and say their inspection company didn't do repairs, which was patently false (do they think we can't use google?). Today, they said they would hire a third engineer if we would agree, in advance, to pay whatever repairs that engineer suggested. ?!?!?! Really whacko buyers to think any sane person would agree to that. I'm not sure if they're just idiots or they think it's a buyers market here or what ... Even their home inspector said it was a unique property in wonderful shape for an old house with numerous upgrades already (new garage, new guest house, new pool, new windows, new roof, new wiring, new kitchen). I'm glad we washed our hands of them. Now I have to vacate the house because another prospective buyer is coming over. And it looks like we may have to have another open house during Zones next weekend. Not the best timing, oh well. Jimby and Stud, who are staying here, will have to be super neat. :-)

I'm just so very glad they precipitously signed a release so that we could put it back on the market right away. I hope the next prospective buyers are not insane. Please.

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Updated April 14th, 2013 at 06:09 PM by The Fortress

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Comments

  1. Sojerz's Avatar
    Sorry to hear about the problems with the nutty buyers and home inspection. Getting your own engineer was a great idea. I'm sure your state laws prohibit anyone who isn't a licensed professional engineer from using the term the "engineer" at all. So, if the home inspector doesn't have "PE" after his name, they aren't an engineer (i.e, anyone who is a professional engineer will always use the PE after their name). Anyone licensed as PE has a BS in some form of engineering and passed about 16 hours of engineering exams. Ideally you want someone who is both a certified home inspector and a PE. Home inspectors do not have to be PEs; they can become certified home inspectors by taking a home inspection course and passing an exam (I think they have to take an exam). I don't know if the state actually licenses them? In any event, they shouldn't be providing opinions that require engineering judgment unless they have a PE. Opinions about structural stability are clearly engineering. We have a big old house too (c.1895) with a stone foundation and creaky sloping floors (aka money pit) - dreading the home inspection stuff when we go to sell it.
  2. The Fortress's Avatar
    Thanks Bill! I'll look at their report, but right now I'm just glad they're out of our lives. I am very glad we got our own report, which should prove helpful going forward too.

    You might want to do your own inspections first so you know what you're up against.
  3. Sojerz's Avatar
    A graduate engineer (BS in engineering) could become a home inspector, but not have his PE license. But even a graduate engineer with a PhD can't offer to practice "engineering" unless he takes the exam and gets the license. I think many of the home inspectors provide very conservative and often uninformed reports and recommendations - they don't really know what they are dealing with, especially structurally, and to avoid any potential liability down the road, they flag things that are really just cosmetic.
  4. ourswimmer's Avatar
    They certainly seem to have proceeded as if your house in particular was way overpriced or as if the local market in general favors buyers strongly. But if you have a good agent with plenty of experience with your kind of house in your area, it's hard to see how their assessment could be accurate. Here's hoping they regret not having taken a sound house at a sound price, and that you can find another buyer who's ready to be more realistic about the transaction.
  5. jaadams1's Avatar
    I'm in the process of fixing up my basement/first floor floor joists in my 1922 home. Someone in the past put in a set of stairs to the basement, and cut ACROSS 9 floor joists in the process, right in the middle of the house. They had so many posts and other things down in the basement that it was almost unusable. We've now gone through and poured new foundations for the new posts and beams to be installed...reducing the number of posts from 12 down to 5. My dad and I figured out the best way to do it. He refers to these problems that we encounter as "homeowner specials". You never know what someone was thinking when they did it, but all we can do is get it fixed. I'm doing this for our own benefit, but one day if we ever do sell, it will make it a lot easier to get rid of this place.
    Compared to my house, yours should be an easy sell, provided you don't get the same people returning next weekend again! Remember, you don't have to even look at their offer. We got our house with a lower offering price than another person, because the people selling the house wanted it to go to a single family who was planning to live in the place, not parcel it up and make rental trash out of it.
  6. The Fortress's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by ourswimmer
    They certainly seem to have proceeded as if your house in particular was way overpriced or as if the local market in general favors buyers strongly. But if you have a good agent with plenty of experience with your kind of house in your area, it's hard to see how their assessment could be accurate. Here's hoping they regret not having taken a sound house at a sound price, and that you can find another buyer who's ready to be more realistic about the transaction.
    Definitely! Our agent, who is very good, says they aren't acting rationally. Right now, the DC market is hot, I live in one of the hottest zip codes, and houses are selling for 96% of their list price here. We have no incentive to deal with their craziness at all right now. Our house has only been on the market one week+.

    We hope it's priced right. They say getting a good offer in the first week is an indicator that you've set it correctly. It's difficult to really know for sure because there are so few comparable properties here. Your area is much more varied.
    Updated April 15th, 2013 at 10:37 AM by The Fortress
  7. Celestial's Avatar
    Sorry about your house woes, been there, done that. Three moves is as good as a fire, by the way.
    Commiserating with your "deadness". Put in 13 azaleas myself yesterday. Well, I dug the holes - made Prince Charming put in the Black Cow and other fertilizer stuff before we set the plants in the ground. Funny, I don't like to get my hands "dirty" - must be a nursing thing!
    Got my new toy on Friday - you'd totally love it & save bunches of money off deep tissue massage as well. It's called a Genie Rub ($177 included shipping)

    Go: here
  8. The Fortress's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Celestial
    Sorry about your house woes, been there, done that. Three moves is as good as a fire, by the way.
    Commiserating with your "deadness". Put in 13 azaleas myself yesterday. Well, I dug the holes - made Prince Charming put in the Black Cow and other fertilizer stuff before we set the plants in the ground. Funny, I don't like to get my hands "dirty" - must be a nursing thing!
    Got my new toy on Friday - you'd totally love it & save bunches of money off deep tissue massage as well. It's called a Genie Rub ($177 included shipping)

    Go: here

    Yeah, selling/buying and moving is very stressful. At least buying our Pittsburgh house was fairly uneventful.

    Digging is like an upper body workout at the gym. We should give ourself flog credit for it.

    I will check out your massage gizmo!
  9. The Fortress's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Sojerz
    A graduate engineer (BS in engineering) could become a home inspector, but not have his PE license. But even a graduate engineer with a PhD can't offer to practice "engineering" unless he takes the exam and gets the license. I think many of the home inspectors provide very conservative and often uninformed reports and recommendations - they don't really know what they are dealing with, especially structurally, and to avoid any potential liability down the road, they flag things that are really just cosmetic.
    The buyer's inspector definitely flagged something in our cellar (chimney) that was purely cosmetic. In the 1920s, they didn't care much about the aesthetics of things in cellars and attics. But ours is in fact working perfectly and we've re-lined it.
  10. The Fortress's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by jaadams1
    I'm in the process of fixing up my basement/first floor floor joists in my 1922 home. Someone in the past put in a set of stairs to the basement, and cut ACROSS 9 floor joists in the process, right in the middle of the house. They had so many posts and other things down in the basement that it was almost unusable. We've now gone through and poured new foundations for the new posts and beams to be installed...reducing the number of posts from 12 down to 5. My dad and I figured out the best way to do it. He refers to these problems that we encounter as "homeowner specials". You never know what someone was thinking when they did it, but all we can do is get it fixed. I'm doing this for our own benefit, but one day if we ever do sell, it will make it a lot easier to get rid of this place.
    Compared to my house, yours should be an easy sell, provided you don't get the same people returning next weekend again! Remember, you don't have to even look at their offer. We got our house with a lower offering price than another person, because the people selling the house wanted it to go to a single family who was planning to live in the place, not parcel it up and make rental trash out of it.
    Good luck on your reno project! Sounds like you're doing the right thing.

    I hope we've heard the last of them. Now if they want to give us a near full price offer with no contingencies, maybe we'd reconsider. I had one swim friend tell me she showed her house 13 times to someone who never made an offer. People are weird. You never know. I just want a somewhat sane buyer.