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Sat., Jan. 11

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Swim/SCY/Solo @ Pitt

Warm up:

650 various
4 x 25 shooter w/fins @ :40
50 EZ

Main Sets:

2 x 25 burst SDK + cruise from a push @ 1:00
5 x 30 burst SDK + cruise back from the blocks
100 EZ

4 x (broken 100s + 100 EZ)
done as 4 x 25 @ :40 @ target 100 pace, no fins
1 = free, goal = 14+ (13/14/14/14)
2 = free, goal = 14+ (13/14/14/14)
3 = breast, goal = 18+ (17/17+/18/18 high)
4 = flutter kick w/fins, hold :11s

300 EZ

After the first set, I was pretty convinced that I couldn't do 20 x 25 @ 100 pace without fins. But I decided to give it a try with freestyle, expecting to miss a few. I also bumped the interval to :45, consistent with what Rushall says is acceptable for older drop dead sprinters.

20 x 25 @ :45 free, no fins
-- trying to hold 14+s
-- made them all except #20 where I cramped and couldn't swim through it.
-- getting to 30 of these reps seems really hard

200 EZ

Total: 3000


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I was pretty tired when I got in the pool. My shoulders felt fatigued form all the fly yesterday. But that didn't stop me from having a good workout.

I've been thinking a lot about USRPT lately. So far I have the following thoughts:

1. RPT is not all that new. Salo and his high intensity style workouts have been around for awhile.

2. Rushall takes the idea of RPT and isolates it to the exclusion of everything else -- literally.

3. He ignores research on the important of strength training.

4. He is a bit cult-like in his declarations. Sometimes I feel like he's a swimming scientologist.

5. I don't think USRPT applies at all to 50s, and Rushall seems to have conceded that they're unique.

6. I think equipment helps and can transfer. Honestly, fins helped me become a great kicker.

7. I don't mind using his 20-30 x 25 set to train for 100s, but that won't be the exclusive way I train for them. I will still use high intensity max rest sets as well.

8. His sets are a great way to maximize your race pace training. But is maximizing RPT really a value in and of itself? More is better just for neural patterning? How much neural patterning do we need?

9. Do you really have to go all in with USRPT? Or can you dabble in it for certain events?

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Swim Workouts

Comments

  1. Jazz Hands's Avatar
    I don't think Rushall has read any strength training studies that came out after 1992.

    Regarding this style of intervals, I think your pace in this workout is slower than your race pace in the 50. It seems like common sense to work on maximal power/technique when training for an all-out sprint, and that's not this. So where's the strong evidence that this training methodology magically transcends common sense?

    Also, Rushall has no actual scientific support for this protocol. Actually he's ignoring some of the real interesting research on the effects of high-intensity interval training on metabolic adaptation. The most interesting studies I've seen involve what you might call lactate tolerance training. They are usually repeated 30-second cycling intervals (haven't seen anything specifically with swimming), with several minutes rest. That's some pretty serious burn, and it's definitely not the pure volume+pace formula Rushall suggests.

    So yeah I think it's ********.
  2. Jazz Hands's Avatar
    Oh, right, asterisks. Horseshit?
  3. The Fortress's Avatar
    I was going for 100 pace today, not 50 pace. Rushall largely ignores all out work. I certainly won't be doing his suggested set for 50 work -- 4 x (6 x 12.5 AFAP) @ :15 rest. Now, that is horsesh*t.

    Rushall doesn't really believe in lactate production. He wants to avoid it to maximize RP yardage and avoid the need for recovery workouts or tapering.

    What interval were the :30 second cycles on in that study and how many cycles before the several minutes of rest? I couldn't do many repeats before needing a significant break ....

    Maybe Rushall is just the latest fad. But race pace beats garbage aerobic yards any day!
  4. Jazz Hands's Avatar
    Cycling as in stationary bicycle. Here's a review by one lab, and one of their specific studies:

    http://blog.sme.sk/blog/3928/155928/...ining_2008.pdf
    http://jp.physoc.org/content/586/1/151.long

    The procotol there is 30s all-out followed by 4m30s rest. I imagine this is pretty exhausting, and I would guess fatigue is related to the mechanism of adaptation. But the authors don't seem particular interested in that, for some reason. They don't measure lactate or power during the training itself, and they haven't done experiments manipulating fatigue.
  5. Jazz Hands's Avatar
    It does sometimes happen that some researcher or coach or whatever gets the idea that fatigue is bad and must always be avoided. This actually happens in strength training a lot. Someone will say that intensity (% of max strength/power, or pace in Rushall's case) and volume are the only important variables in training, and they will point out the negative effects of fatigue. But why wouldn't fatigue induce adaptation? Sounds plausible enough, and there's real evidence for it.

    And Rushall can go on about the scary effects of fatigue, but in my own experience pure volume*intensity is not a formula for winning so much as it's the exact formula for tendinitis. That's why I do all of my strength training to failure now: it allows me to do less volume with heavy weights, which saves my joints.
  6. The Fortress's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Jazz Hands

    http://blog.sme.sk/blog/3928/155928/...ining_2008.pdf
    http://jp.physoc.org/content/586/1/151.long

    The procotol there is 30s all-out followed by 4m30s rest. I imagine this is pretty exhausting, and I would guess fatigue is related to the mechanism of adaptation. But the authors don't seem particular interested in that, for some reason. They don't measure lactate or power during the training itself, and they haven't done experiments manipulating fatigue.
    I like to do all out 50s on 5:00, but I can't imagine doing it for 40-60 minutes. I would likely be pretty flattened the next day. Too many reps is not exactly sprinter material.

    Interesting that the first sentence of the study is what Rushall focuses on -- oxidative capacity. Contrary to this study, Rushall theorizes that you achieve this by bypassing the anaerobic system and using the ATP and aerobic systems instead.
    Updated January 12th, 2014 at 10:48 AM by The Fortress
  7. Jazz Hands's Avatar
    So, yeah, that kind of training is brutal. The studies are very short-lived and they are not looking at burnout or overtraining.

    Also, remember 50s are shorter than 30 seconds for you or me, so it's even worse than doing 50s. For burn sets I used to do 75s. I would also do kick and pull sets, which I felt were less psychologically taxing but still produced effects in more isolated muscle groups. This was back in 2009 when I was training for Clovis. I had a good season, with maybe some symptoms of overtraining by the end of it.
  8. The Fortress's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Jazz Hands
    So, yeah, that kind of training is brutal. The studies are very short-lived and they are not looking at burnout or overtraining.

    Also, remember 50s are shorter than 30 seconds for you or me, so it's even worse than doing 50s. For burn sets I used to do 75s. I would also do kick and pull sets, which I felt were less psychologically taxing but still produced effects in more isolated muscle groups. This was back in 2009 when I was training for Clovis. I had a good season, with maybe some symptoms of overtraining by the end of it.
    75s all out? How many?

    With my fairly crappy training since last June, I haven't really done any burn sets.
  9. Jazz Hands's Avatar
    3x75 or 4x75 was pretty typical for me. Or, like, 75+25 with short rest.
  10. Beards247's Avatar
    I'm curious how Fins helped you become a better kicker - I don't doubt you - I just want to learn to use them properly. I actively encourage folks to kick without fins b/c they just use them every time they do a kick set - and then say their kicking sucks (causative? I think so.) Over the last year I've done a lot more kick sets and I think it has been working pretty well.
  11. knelson's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Beards247
    I actively encourage folks to kick without fins b/c they just use them every time they do a kick set - and then say their kicking sucks
    I agree with this. I don't see a problem with using fins/zoomers occasionally, but I read some people's blogs who seem to use them for every single kick set.
  12. The Fortress's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Beards247
    I'm curious how Fins helped you become a better kicker - I don't doubt you - I just want to learn to use them properly. I actively encourage folks to kick without fins b/c they just use them every time they do a kick set - and then say their kicking sucks (causative? I think so.) Over the last year I've done a lot more kick sets and I think it has been working pretty well.
    Well, I am mostly a dolphin kicker. Fins definitely made my legs stronger (the added resistance can be like weights), helped me work on streamlining, and were great for going very fast (which I think helped with some neural conditioning). I don't dolphin kick without fins all that much. The more dolphin kicking I've added to my races, the faster my times have gotten.

    Flutter kicking could be different. And zoomers may be better for that anyway.

    There could also be a difference in training effect for sprinter vs. mid-D type.