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Weights + Lactate Set, Wed., May 20

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Weights:

bench press (Hammer), 70 x 1 x 10, 80 x 1 x 10, 90 x 1 x 10, 100 x 1 x 8
leg press, 310 x 1 x 10, 330 x 1 x 10, 350 x 1 x 10
hi row (Hammer), 140 x 1 x 10, 160 x 1 x 10, 180 x 1 x 10
forward lunges w/15 lb DBs, 1 x 20
total ab machine, 120 x 1 x 15, 130 x 1 x 15, 140 x 1 x 15
decline reverse crunch, 2 x 25
elevated crunch w/med ball, 2 x 25

prone scapular scrunches w/ 5 lb DBs, 2 x 25
external rotators, 10 x 2 x 15, each side
hip hinges w/ 10 lb DBs, 1 x 15, left leg

Swim/SCY/Solo:

Decided to do a test set today. Hadn't done any real lactate work in awhile. I was tired from 4:30 am carpool duty and weights, but decided to just git 'er done anyway. There's never an ideal time to do these sets.

Warm up:

700 variety swim, kick, drill

4 x 25 UW shooter on back, no fins

2 x (25 build free + 25 EZ)
1 x 25 AFAP free
50 EZ

Lactate Set:

5 x 100 backstroke w/fins @ 8:00
200 EZ after each one

Went 57.5, 57.5, 58, 57, 57
(cramped on the last couple, but swam through it)

I'd like to also have a test set for 100s kicking and 50s swimming and kicking.
Total: 2475

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The soreness from weights has abated. But there are still a couple isolated muscles in my upper arms bothering me. I'm not sure, but I think they are from using the ab sling. The ab sling seems to take some of the direct weight from the hanging ab work off the shoulders, but it's hard on some muscles. Not sure if this is something you get used to or not.

I've started warming up more on certain exercises before attempting to increase weight. As the weight gets heavier, this intuitively seems to be advisable. Am I doing this correctly?

McTrusty noted on his blog that Eddie Reese recommends keeping your hands very close together on your fly pull. Your thumbs, if extended, should almost touch. I think I need to work on this more. I'm pretty sure I've gotten most of the old S type pull out of my stroke.

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Updated May 20th, 2009 at 08:47 PM by The Fortress

Categories
Swim Workouts , Strength Training and Dryland Workouts , Test Sets

Comments

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  1. Jazz Hands's Avatar
    You're on to the right thing with warming up. The more weight you lift, the more time it takes to prepare.
  2. qbrain's Avatar
    I've started warming up more on certain exercises before attempting to increase weight. As the weight gets heavier, this intuitively seems to be advisable. Am I doing this correctly?
    Yes. I do 4 warm up sets of increasing weights before I start my main set of squats. Even after all that, my second set always feels better than my first.

    The more warm up sets you have, the less reps you want. You don't want to burn glycogen needlessly
  3. aztimm's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by qbrain
    Yes. I do 4 warm up sets of increasing weights before I start my main set of squats. Even after all that, my second set always feels better than my first.

    The more warm up sets you have, the less reps you want. You don't want to burn glycogen needlessly
    So what is a good warm-up set to do, weights-wise and also reps wise?

    An easy example: say I'm lifting 100 lbs for 12 reps a set. What would be a good warm-up?

    I have a feeling I'm wasting too much energy warming-up...
  4. The Fortress's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by qbrain
    Yes. I do 4 warm up sets of increasing weights before I start my main set of squats. Even after all that, my second set always feels better than my first.

    The more warm up sets you have, the less reps you want. You don't want to burn glycogen needlessly
    Thx Q.

    How many reps should one do?

    I was wondering what Tim just posted as well.
  5. Jazz Hands's Avatar
    I warm up with singles, doubles, and triples. Maybe if my work sets are going to be very high rep, I'll do five reps or so on the warm-ups.

    Of course, that's in the type of workout where the warm-up sets are distinct from the work sets. You can also do a sort of blended workout, where you hold the same number of reps (say, 10) and do several sets, increasing the weight slightly. The heavier sets are obviously going to be more of the training stimulus, but there's no clear point of division between warm-up and work.
  6. The Fortress's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Jazz Hands
    I warm up with singles, doubles, and triples. Maybe if my work sets are going to be very high rep, I'll do five reps or so on the warm-ups.

    Of course, that's in the type of workout where the warm-up sets are distinct from the work sets. You can also do a sort of blended workout, where you hold the same number of reps (say, 10) and do several sets, increasing the weight slightly. The heavier sets are obviously going to be more of the training stimulus, but there's no clear point of division between warm-up and work.
    What exactly do you mean by "singles, doubles and triples"? Doing reps of 1, 2 and 3?

    What warm up system do you favor? Doing a distinct warm up and then lifting close to max? Or gradually increasing weight?
  7. The Fortress's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Jazz Hands
    I warm up with singles, doubles, and triples. Maybe if my work sets are going to be very high rep, I'll do five reps or so on the warm-ups.

    Of course, that's in the type of workout where the warm-up sets are distinct from the work sets. You can also do a sort of blended workout, where you hold the same number of reps (say, 10) and do several sets, increasing the weight slightly. The heavier sets are obviously going to be more of the training stimulus, but there's no clear point of division between warm-up and work.
    Oh, I was thinking of one of your statements the other day about the decline bench press. I really like that lift too. And I'm sorry to say that my gym does not have that Hammer machine. Argh!
  8. qbrain's Avatar
    For squats, I am doing BWx5, 45x5, 50%x3, 70%x2, but there is nothing magic about those percentages. Those first two sets are just to loosen up, and the last two sets get me ready for real weight.

    I am trying to think of a good general rule of thumb, but I don't have anything good. You want to do a several reps really light to work full range of motion, get blood flowing to the muscles. Then if you are lifting something you consider heavy, you probably want to set or too to get you ready for lifting that weight, but just do 2 or 3 reps.

    Other than the really light set, I wouldn't do more than 3 reps for a warm up set. Individually, it isn't much energy, but when you are doing pull ups at the end of your work out, you need that little bit of energy multiple by allt he previous warm up sets. At least I do.


    I don't like doing just 1 warm up rep, because it feel like I am just unracking and racking the weight. Nothing wrong with it, just a personal preference.

    Jazz's blended set warm up surprisingly matches Fort's workout exactly today With that in mind, let me adjust my suggestion. You should not do a bunch of warm up reps when you have a heavy target set coming up.

    Just like swimming or running. You don't wear yourself out in warming up and then expect to do well sprinting.
  9. Jazz Hands's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by The Fortress
    What exactly do you mean by "singles, doubles and triples"? Doing reps of 1, 2 and 3?

    What warm up system do you favor? Doing a distinct warm up and then lifting close to max? Or gradually increasing weight?
    Yeah, single is one rep, double is two reps, etc. What I favor goes back and forth, and I prefer doing different rep schemes for different exercises as well. My workout blog is a pretty good indication. Here's my last workout:

    Inverted rows
    0x10
    10x10
    20x10
    25x10
    35x10

    Hang pulls
    135x10x2

    Full squats
    225x3x4
    So, inverted rows was a blended rep scheme. I started with no weight, and on each set I added some weight (for inverted rows I balance plates on my chest, a spotter is really helpful for this).

    On both hang pulls and squats, I did some warm-up sets that weren't listed. I think I did a couple sets of five reps with just the bar on hang pulls. Not much warm-up there since I had already been pulling (inverted rows) and it's a light exercise anyway. Squats involved doing some sets of [no idea] reps with just the bar, and doubles at 135, 155, 175, and 185. Squat warm-ups for me are never fun, since my knees are all creaky and achey at the beginning.
  10. Jazz Hands's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by The Fortress
    Oh, I was thinking of one of your statements the other day about the decline bench press. I really like that lift too. And I'm sorry to say that my gym does not have that Hammer machine. Argh!
    Does your gym have decline bench stations with barbells? That makes it easy. I have to wheel a free decline bench (like for sit-ups) into a power rack to do decline bench press, and it's awkward because of how the weight hooks are set up.

    If you're afraid of barbell benching because of your shoulders, decline bench might be nicer to you.
  11. aztimm's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Jazz Hands
    I warm up with singles, doubles, and triples. Maybe if my work sets are going to be very high rep, I'll do five reps or so on the warm-ups.

    Of course, that's in the type of workout where the warm-up sets are distinct from the work sets. You can also do a sort of blended workout, where you hold the same number of reps (say, 10) and do several sets, increasing the weight slightly. The heavier sets are obviously going to be more of the training stimulus, but there's no clear point of division between warm-up and work.
    Thanks for the tips, and I'm sorry to step all over The Fortress's blog

    The more I read through some running forums, the more I'm finding that I'm doing everything all wrong (but it seems to work for me). But at least here, I am doing the blended workout. When I'm lifting free weights (especially benching) I get really freaked out about lifting heavy since I don't have a spotter.
  12. The Fortress's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Jazz Hands
    Yeah, single is one rep, double is two reps, etc. What I favor goes back and forth, and I prefer doing different rep schemes for different exercises as well. My workout blog is a pretty good indication. Here's my last workout:



    So, inverted rows was a blended rep scheme. I started with no weight, and on each set I added some weight (for inverted rows I balance plates on my chest, a spotter is really helpful for this).

    On both hang pulls and squats, I did some warm-up sets that weren't listed. I think I did a couple sets of five reps with just the bar on hang pulls. Not much warm-up there since I had already been pulling (inverted rows) and it's a light exercise anyway. Squats involved doing some sets of [no idea] reps with just the bar, and doubles at 135, 155, 175, and 185. Squat warm-ups for me are never fun, since my knees are all creaky and achey at the beginning.
    Thx Jazz.

    I'll have to google inverted row.

    When you say "full squats" are you doing back or front squats? Having the barbell sitting on my shoulders is still bothering me for these things. I'm thinking it might be less bothersome with front squats, but then the hand position for those is weird.

    Creaky and achey knees? You'd think you were old or something.
  13. The Fortress's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Jazz Hands
    Does your gym have decline bench stations with barbells? That makes it easy. I have to wheel a free decline bench (like for sit-ups) into a power rack to do decline bench press, and it's awkward because of how the weight hooks are set up.

    If you're afraid of barbell benching because of your shoulders, decline bench might be nicer to you.
    I'm not sure. I'll have to check it out. When I tried the decline bench press in Tucson, it did feel more shoulder friendly to me.
  14. The Fortress's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by aztimm
    Thanks for the tips, and I'm sorry to step all over The Fortress's blog

    The more I read through some running forums, the more I'm finding that I'm doing everything all wrong (but it seems to work for me). But at least here, I am doing the blended workout. When I'm lifting free weights (especially benching) I get really freaked out about lifting heavy since I don't have a spotter.
    Step in anytime!

    Yes, your running program is somewhat unconventional. Perhaps it's working because you're still relatively new to distance running? Most marathoners do more diverse runs, including speed work.

    I never have a spotter either. I think this limits what you can do somewhat, and forces you to use machines more.
  15. Jazz Hands's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by The Fortress
    When you say "full squats" are you doing back or front squats? Having the barbell sitting on my shoulders is still bothering me for these things. I'm thinking it might be less bothersome with front squats, but then the hand position for those is weird.
    Front squat with crossed arms is really easy. Just keep your elbows up.

    "Squats" by default means back squats.
  16. The Fortress's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Jazz Hands
    Front squat with crossed arms is really easy. Just keep your elbows up.

    "Squats" by default means back squats.
    OK, I'll try the front one next time then. Any recommendations on amount of weight?
  17. Jazz Hands's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by The Fortress
    OK, I'll try the front one next time then. Any recommendations on amount of weight?
    Just the bar, then add weight until you can't do them with good form anymore.
  18. The Fortress's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Jazz Hands
    Just the bar, then add weight until you can't do them with good form anymore.
    How much does the bar weigh?
  19. qbrain's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by The Fortress
    How much does the bar weigh?
    45lbs.
  20. The Fortress's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by qbrain
    45lbs.
    WTH? Really? No wonder when I tried to deadlift at a heavy weight with it once it was barely moving ...
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