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Q: How to prepare for an international event

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by , September 15th, 2014 at 01:00 AM (1463 Views)
Q: What should I tell my swimmers who are preparing for an international meet?
A:
Eliminating surprises when swimming in any event, especially international competition, can help alleviate stress and increase your chances of having a successful meet. Preparation should begin as soon as there is interest in a particular event, not after you arrive at the meet.

  1. Don't assume everyone speaks English. Learn basic questions and answers in the language of the country you're visiting.
  2. Familiarize yourself with the venue and potential weather conditions prior to arrival. This will help you pack accordingly.
  3. Make a written list of everything you'll need to pack. Plan and pack for worst-case scenarios. You should have more than one swimsuit and pair of goggles. Replacements of these items may not be available at the meet. Clear and tinted goggles should be packed for varying conditions.
  4. Plan your transportation from your lodgings to the venue. If you're using your own vehicle, know your parking options, the cost, and the distance to the venue.
  5. If you're traveling to a different time zone, try to arrive at the event early enough to adapt to the change.
  6. Visit the venue before the meet starts and find the toilets, lockers, and showers.
  7. Locate a drinkable water source. If none is provided, know you'll need to bring your own. If you'll need to eat at the venue, know what your options are and, if necessary, bring your own food.
  8. Find a spot where you will be sitting during the meet. If no comfortable seating is provided, bring your own--portable chairs are inexpensive and easy to transport.
  9. If the event is being held outdoors, find shade and protection from the elements.
  10. Have a plan for your warm-up. If you'll be competing in more than one pool, schedule your warm-ups to familiarize yourself with all pools. Note the temperature of each pool, the walls, flags, turns, starting blocks, markings on the pool bottom, water clarity and variations of pool depth. Practice every aspect of the events you are swimming in each of the pools. Starts, both dives off the blocks and backstroke, should only be practiced in designated start lanes. If the blocks are different from what you are accustomed to, ask a USMS On-Deck Coach (if available) for help. In most cases, start lanes are only open during warm-up periods in the competition pools.
  11. Study the timeline for your events. If the meet organizers don't provide one, calculate your own with the heat sheet or psych sheet. This can be tricky, so allow yourself a comfortable margin to get to the pool and your events early. No one is going to wait for you. Know how much warm-up you need. Often the warm-up pools are crowded and you'll need more time than usual to swim or kick the same amount of yardage. Generally, swim gear such as snorkels, hand paddles, and pull buoys are not allowed during warm-up.
  12. Pay attention to the progress of the day's events leading up to your swim. Many international meets require you to report to a marshaling area several heats before you're scheduled to swim. If you were issued credentials at registration, bring them with you. Also, bring your goggles, a towel, and a drink. Use the toilet before you report, as there's no telling how long you'll be waiting. If you need to leave the marshaling area, ask the marshaling personnel. A smile goes a long way when asking for help.
  13. Well before you get to the block, listen to the starters' instructions and translate if necessary. Know the procedure for when and where to exit the pool after your event. Ask a coach or teammate to record your finish time, as it may be difficult for you to see the scoreboard from the water at the end of your swim.
  14. Event results may be online or posted in a designated area. Often, results are not available for an hour or longer after the event is completed. Each event has a limited period during which a protest may be filed. If you were disqualified from an event and want to file a protest, immediately seek out the meet referee, a meet official, or a USMS coach (if available), and ask what procedure to follow.

Swimming at international meets can be a very rewarding experience if you're prepared to accept that not every meet is run like a USMS National Championship. Maintain a positive outlook and make the best of every challenge you face. Remember, in most cases, the conditions are the same for all competitors—it's your preparation and attitude that may differentiate you from your competition.

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