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Mediterranean Diet and Breast Cancer

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A study published in the September 14, 2015 edition of JAMA Internal Medicine examined the data from the PREDIMED study that examined diet and risk for cardiovascular disease. In this secondary analysis, the researchers looked to see what effect two different dietary interventions would have on the incidence of breast cancer. The two intervention groups were advised to eat a Mediterranean style diet: high in vegetables, fruits, fish, and olive oil. One group was given a liter of extra virgin olive oil per week to use and share with their families. Another group was given a daily supply of nuts: 15 g walnuts, 7.5 grams almonds, 7.5 grams hazelnuts. The control group was advised to follow a low fat diet. Compared with the control group, the Mediterranean diet with extra virgin olive oil had a 68% reduction in breast cancer incidence. There was also a reduction in the nuts group, but not statistically significant. Limitations of the study included a lack of universal screening for breast cancer prior to the study, the small number of women who did get breast cancer, and the fact that all the women were while, postmenopausal, and at high risk for cardiovascular disease. Previously the researchers did show that this diet did reduce the risk for cardiovascular disease. There doesn’t seem to be a down-side to eating a Mediterranean type diet rich in olive oil—whether to prevent heart disease or to prevent breast cancer.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0914092837.htm

Jessica Seaton

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