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Elise's Fitness Fun

Balancing the advantages and disadvantages

Rating: 2 votes, 5.00 average.
by , October 21st, 2009 at 10:22 PM (1232 Views)
Ran 5k today. Had hoped to go at a faster pace, but just haven't felt good since the end of last week. I know that POTs thing is still kind of kicked up and the bottom line is that running is not the ideal thing for it.

The way I felt today, I contemplated just giving running up. I think it is really wearing me out, particularly when the POTs is kicked up. At the same time, some running does actually seem to help keep it from acting up too much. It is also good for bone density, good HDL counts, slimming up, etc.

I'm struggling though with the idea of not being very competitive anymore. There are a few local 5ks where I would love to beat a few people. Have to confess I used to love nothing more than to beat people who trained twice the mileage, especially those who were rumored to say, "All she can do is swim."

Although I felt great a couple of weeks ago, I feel like I have now gone backwards. Not sure if this is because of the POTS or if because I've simply gotten out of shape on my running somehow. Maybe doing both running and swimming is wearing me out. Still, I don't think I'm doing either running or swimming that much to get so worn down.

Surely that 75 butterfly set I did yesterday didn't take that much out of me! If so, I'm hurtin'!

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Updated October 21st, 2009 at 10:28 PM by elise526

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  1. The Fortress's Avatar
    I think it's just lingering effects from the POTs. Probably will clear up again soon, don't you think? I don't think it was the fly set b/c you only did 4.

    Do you have to compete to enjoy running? I guess you ex-triathletes naturally want to compete in all disciplines. I have to say that, with my swimming races, I have no desire whatsoever to compete in running at the moment.
  2. elise526's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by The Fortress
    I think it's just lingering effects from the POTs. Probably will clear up again soon, don't you think? I don't think it was the fly set b/c you only did 4.

    Do you have to compete to enjoy running? I guess you ex-triathletes naturally want to compete in all disciplines. I have to say that, with my swimming races, I have no desire whatsoever to compete in running at the moment.
    Hopefully, it will clear up soon. Have to say I always feel like a million bucks when it does!

    Gotta confess that I am an overly competitive person. In some ways, though, I'm kind of lazy and need a race to keep me exercising.

    I'm afraid my overcompetitive nature is rubbing off on my son. His teacher told me today that he thinks everything is a race. My husband usually drives him to school in the morning since his office is right next door to the school. This morning, he was running a little later than usual, so son was the last one in the classroom this morning. Money for a movie was due this morning and the teacher told me that son was crushed when he found out the other kids had turned their money in before he got into the classroom this morning.
  3. Bobinator's Avatar
    You can learn how to run just for enjoyment. When I quit for 2 years I found the thing I missed most about running was being outdoors. I don't care how hot/cold/slick/or wet it is I truly benefit from being outside. Now my once a week or so runs focus on being outside and enjoying the scenery, sounds, and feelings from the elements. You can do this.
  4. elise526's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Bobinator
    You can learn how to run just for enjoyment. When I quit for 2 years I found the thing I missed most about running was being outdoors. I don't care how hot/cold/slick/or wet it is I truly benefit from being outside. Now my once a week or so runs focus on being outside and enjoying the scenery, sounds, and feelings from the elements. You can do this.
    I really do need to learn to do this. I guess I'm afraid to quit the quest for competing in running because I want to "beat" this thing. I hear horror stories about people who have been diagnosed with this thing as having to do their grocery shopping in a wheelchair because standing upright exhausts them so much. Then I hear stories about people who are diagnosed, then the damn thing just disappears and they are fine.

    On the one hand, it is one thing to try to be victorious over something, it is another to be doing something outright dangerous and stupid. It occurred to me out at the track the other day that I was really pushing the envelope.

    May just rest completely for a couple of days and re-think it again.
  5. Bobinator's Avatar
    Definitely keep yourself safe!
    Maybe instead of track type workouts you could just run in your comfort zone, whatever pace it is on that day.
    If you feel frisky throw a little fartlek work or threshold type work in. I almost never did track work in running,I hated it!
  6. The Fortress's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Bobinator
    You can learn how to run just for enjoyment. When I quit for 2 years I found the thing I missed most about running was being outdoors. I don't care how hot/cold/slick/or wet it is I truly benefit from being outside. Now my once a week or so runs focus on being outside and enjoying the scenery, sounds, and feelings from the elements. You can do this.
    I agree. This is exactly what I have done with running in the past. I just like to be outdoors in my zen state.
  7. elise526's Avatar
    Actually, I enjoy the track work the most. Don't think I would want to give it up. Boring as it may seem, I guess I'd rather do an easy run on the track than anywhere else. Ran track my junior and senior years of high school (400, 800, mile and two mile), so it brings back good memories to go out to the track.

    The long, slow runs seem to bother me the most. For me, it is the length of time that I am upright that is the problem. More time = more pooling of blood in my abdomen and legs. My heart has to work harder the longer I am upright to pull the blood up. After a 400, I usually stop, bend over for a few seconds, then go real easy. Also, the harder or faster I run, the more my leg muscles constrict which aids in pushing the blood up to my heart. Unfortunately, there is a breaking point where this doesn't work, hence the quick, short little efforts with some good rest in-between.

    My HR problem is caused by pooling of blood in my legs. The blood pools because of a malfunction in my nervous system. Most people's blood vessels constrict when they stand which in turn pushes the blood up to their hearts and brains. Mine don't quite constrict the way they are supposed to. My heart has to work twice as hard as a normal person's when I stand just to get the blood up to my heart and my head.

    I probably would be better off running 2 miles hard than doing 6 easy slow miles. Unfortunately, for me, as I discovered in the past, the longer runs got me faster and better-conditioned.
    Updated October 22nd, 2009 at 03:33 PM by elise526
  8. BabsVa's Avatar
    Hi there - as others allude to, keep running but keep it enjoyable and run slower. It will keep your metabolism cookin' without wearing you down.

    I wish I could be half the swimmer you are.
  9. elise526's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by BabsVa
    Hi there - as others allude to, keep running but keep it enjoyable and run slower. It will keep your metabolism cookin' without wearing you down.

    I wish I could be half the swimmer you are.
    Thanks, BabsVa. I guess there is no point in doing it if it is not enjoyable. In reading and thinking over the comments, it may not hurt to back it down a little.