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Vlog the Inhaler, or The Occasional Video Blog Musings of Jim Thornton

Elbow and swimming

Rating: 11 votes, 3.91 average.
Can an inflamed elbow make swimming anything other than just unpleasant? Can it make it, for instance, slower and/or less indefatigable? Can it distract from ones mental processing in such a way as to induce tactical mistakes, or induce such a fear of inadvertent dinging on the taut lines that you give the line you fear unreasonable berth, which might only throw you into ensnarement with its parallel mate?

What can be done with a smallish sharp one in the bottom crook, a pointy little arrowhead of bone, upon which surface area the thought that anything ligamentous might possibly adhere seems laughable, and yet something is adhering, and being subjected to forces that strip the filaments into a horsetail of red pain. Is there anything to be done here. anything at all?

This is what it looks like.

So little in life these days gives me any joy whatsoever. But to draw an anatomical depiction of my elbow, in a style that might be mistaken for Rafael's, were it conceivable that Rafael might have had access to Magic Markers, well, just, a mountain of suppositions and ifs and perhaps this or thats: but a break has been earned, don't you think? A small one?

So, ecce elbow. It's been several months since the damage was done by my racquet during outdoors tennis season. But it lingers and loiters and lallygags and dawdles, impervious to ice; unblunted by naproxen; cajoled at best into some whispered temporary quiet by hypnotics and speedballs of my own concocting.

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Comments

  1. RustyScupperton's Avatar
    Could Jim be our generation's William Blake? A great writer whose art enhances the written word? That pain certainly seems to me to be "piping loud, like a fiend hid in a cloud"!
  2. Chicken of the Sea's Avatar
    what he said.
  3. jim thornton's Avatar
    When I awoke from the cloud I share with the fiend, that is to say, me, I had no memory whatsoever of writing this vlog. I think the fiend has found his portal to the world through my latest pharmaceutical friend.
  4. Kurt Dickson's Avatar
    olecranon bursitis--get off your hands and knees--you don't have to do that anymore--you are a respectable adult.
  5. jaegermeister's Avatar
    Jim-
    Is this on the outside of your elbow, like where you'd rest it if you were arm wrestling? Or is it slightly off to the side? Sorry to require additional description, but my head's still thick from the weekend.
  6. jim thornton's Avatar
    Thanks very much, as always, Dr. Dickson. I looked up olecranon bursitis, or as I like to call it, Ole! Crayons! bursitis, at the following site: http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00028

    I don't have any swelling, so it doesn't appear to be advanced. I do seem to manage to whack the elbow hard at least once per practice on the lane line. Perhaps this, like adding a small piece of kindling to a fire that might otherwise go out, may be at least partly responsible for the continuation of symptoms.

    As far as getting down on my hands and knees, we all must peregrinate this bitter planet as best we can. In my case, bidpedalism has given way to quadrapeding. How soon, I wonder, till slithering becomes my only form of locomotion? And then, like a hog-nosed snake that can move no more, the saga of Jamesuardo shall come to its olecranon-tormented conclusion at last?
  7. jim thornton's Avatar
    Thanks very much, as always, Dr. Dickson. I looked up olecranon bursitis, or as I like to call it, Ole! Crayons! bursitis, at the following site: http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00028

    I don't have any swelling, so it doesn't appear to be advanced. I do seem to manage to whack the elbow hard at least once per practice on the lane line. Perhaps this, like adding a small piece of kindling to a fire that might otherwise go out, may be at least partly responsible for the continuation of symptoms.

    As far as getting down on my hands and knees, we all must peregrinate this bitter planet as best we can. In my case, bidpedalism has given way to quadrapeding. How soon, I wonder, till slithering becomes my only form of locomotion? And then, like a hog-nosed snake that can move no more, the saga of Jamesuardo shall come to its olecranon-tormented conclusion at last?
  8. jim thornton's Avatar
    Sorry for the double posting.

    Tom, I, too, am thick from the weekend.

    I don't think it's the lateral epicondyle but rather the medial version thereof. In fact, when looking at this picture--assuming it posts--I think the good Dr. Dickson was wrong in blaming the Ole Crayons, too.

    Normally, when I have had tennis elbow in the past, the culprit was the lateral epidondyle. This time it's on the other side of the elbow. If we were shaking hands, it would be the little jabby bone on the same side of the elbow as my palm is facing.

  9. jim thornton's Avatar
    Tom and Kurt, actually, the above picture notwithstanding, I can't really tell which jabby bone--olecranon or medial epichondyle--is giving me pain. If I rest my arm on a table, it's the jabby bone that first makes contact with the table surface.

    It seems that one of the Nautilus machines I have been using is keeping the tenderness alive, but I can't figure out which machine.

    To be honest, if this jabby bone were my only source of travail, I would be thrilled. I think whatever chemical(s) in the brain that might be termed "joy juice" have reached the elastic limits of pharmaceutical augmentation.

    Then again, to paraphrase Hemingway, "It's only morbid weltshmerz. Many must have it."

    Though the number of those that have this PLUS elbow jabby bone pain is somewhat reduced.
  10. jaegermeister's Avatar
    Still not sure, but seems more likely its the olecranon.

    I'd presume for now that it is olecranon bursitis. Simple principles: protect your elbow, get an elbow pad, don't do anything that makes it hurt, and don't let anyone stick a needle in it.

    BTW, medial epicondylitis is pretty common. Though there's not a catchy phrase to describe it. Maybe we should call it "Weltshmerz elbow".
  11. jim thornton's Avatar
    Thanks, Tom. It's too bad because my friend, John Delaney, had this incredible tennis racqet--a Babelot--which did for my tennis game what a B70 did for my swimming, that is to say, add a level of respectability to my performance that really shouldn't have been there in the first place.

    What FINA giveth, FINA taketh away.

    What Babelot giveth, Babelot taketh away via olecranon bursitis and/or medial epidondylitis.

    And finally, what God giveth, God never had any intention whatsoever of letting me keepeth. This, too, has been taketh away.
  12. Kurt Dickson's Avatar
    Since your are not a golfer please do not publish why you have medial epicondylitis (I have too many disturbing images already implanted in my gentle mind)

    It could be worse...welstschmerz is better than mittelschmerz (you don't have ovaries do you?)
  13. jim thornton's Avatar
    Mittelschmerz is one-sided, lower abdominal pain that occurs in women
    at or around the time of an egg is released from the ovaries
    (ovulation). Lower-abdominal pain that is.


    Just as there is hysterical pregnancy, I am sure there can be cases of hysterical mittelschmerz even in men like me, who have gone through hysterical menopause and hence have at least two "rational" reasons why we should be free of mittelschmerz of any sort.

    However, now that you have informed me of the condition, I suspect I will begin suffering from it soon enough--just as proved the case with my stubborn case of Bird Fancier's Lung shortly after I learned of this bane's existence, as well.

    Thanks, Kurt.
  14. matysekj's Avatar
    Jim, I had bilateral (both arms) medial epicondylitis that basically killed 2001 for me and rendered my freestyle stroke ineffective ever since then. I ended up having surgery on both arms and have to be careful now to treat them well if the pain starts to flair up again. See http://forums.usms.org/showthread.ph...edial#post3565 . I can fill you in on any details if you like.
  15. jim thornton's Avatar
    Thanks, Jim. I am not sure if I have the same thing or not. Mine definitely resulted from the Babelot, but swimming--and weight lifting--appear to have kept it going.

    The only way I will have surgery at this point in my life is over my dead body.

    I am pretty sure they call this procedure "an autopsy."

    The good thing about "an autopsy" is that the atheist patient like myself truly does not give a **** about the results.