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Thread: Lane lines

  1. #21
    Very Active Member Shaky's Avatar
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    Originally posted by kaelonj
    Shaky, have you tried talking to the instructor about the equipement and having participants too close to the lane line, the instructor might not be aware of this, they obviously have a duty to ensure they are conducting their class in a safe manner, also let the lifeguard know, once again they are there to ensure everyone's safety.
    I and other swimmers have alerted the lifeguards to the problems. They usually smile, apologize, say they'll speak to the aerobics instructor about it and generally play the good diplomat. I'm not sure if they actually do speak to the instructors, but the problems continue. We have asked them to tighten the lane lines as well, and that usually lasts a day or so before it's loose again.

    The instructors are usually in the pool with the participants in the class, making it difficult to discuss with them. I rarely have time to wait for them to get out of the pool after my workout, and I usually don't want to stop my workout if they finish before I do. I feel that it should be enough to alert the lifeguard to the problem, since they are the authority in the pool.

    Originally posted by kaelonj
    ...keeping at 84 is a bit of a compromise leaning more towards the AquaX and Lesson people - but they probably make up the bulk of the pool users, not the lap swimmers.
    Not at my pool. During peak hours, before and after work, there are usually a minimum of three lap swimmers to a lane, swimming circles, with everyone on different workouts. Usually there are more. The limit is supposed to be five in a lane, but the lifeguards won't enforce it, and you sometimes end up with as many as seven before people start giving up. We usually have more people swimming laps than treading water in the aerobics lanes.

    And therein lies one of the big problems. There are two water aerobics classes each day, and they're both scheduled at the busiest times for lap swimmers (in the morning before work and in the evening after work). They take two lanes for the class, pushing everyone else into the remaining four. The class is mostly made up of elderly ladies who are retired or semi-retired, but the assistant aquatics director told me they have to schedule the classes at those times in case anyone who still works would like to attend.

    Additionally, adult swim lessons and masters swimming overlaps the time the aerobes are in the pool on certain evenings. You'll have times when the lap swimmers are down to two lanes. There will be seven in each lane with people waiting on deck. I quit going at night for this very reason.

    Let me stress that I have used several pools where lap swimmers and water aerobes shared space, but this is the first where I have encountered these problems. In the other pools, the aerobes were respectful of the lap swimmers' space, didn't kick them, and didn't toss their floaties into the path of the swimmers. Likewise, the lifeguards at these other pools were more attentive to the lane ropes and made sure they were appropriately tightened.

    Originally posted by emmett
    It has been my experience that lap swimmers tend to be the most demanding (in some cases, militant) patrons in the facility. They tend to be more territorial (that's MY lane) than other groups.
    It's not a matter of being territorial just to claim some space. It's a matter of not being kicked or having your way impeded. It's a matter of having enough room to safely complete your exercise.

    Tell me how you would react if I stood next to your lane as you were swimming and kicked you as you went by. Tell me how you would react if I repeatedly threw things over in your path as you tried to swim. Somehow I don't think you would be very friendly to me. Yet, in your response, you seem to think that we should just accept it. Sorry, I don't, and I don't think you would, either.

    Originally posted by emmett
    (grabbing someone else's equipment and throwing it out of the pool, if witnessed by the lifeguard, would get you a day or so of cooling off at the very least).
    Since that comment was obviously directed at me, let me tell you what would happen next.

    Most likely, that lifeguard would find himself in a meeting with me and the president of the facility, being asked to explain how he had neglected his responsibilities to the extent that swimmers were having to do his job for him. I would probably ask the president of the company how he would regard someone who went up to the indoor track on the fourth floor and tossed foam dumbells into the path of the joggers there. Then I would ask whether a jogger who grabbed the obstruction and threw it out of the way would be banned from the track. I would point out that the situation was the same, and in fact even more irritating, since the swimmers usually are not looking straight ahead across the top of the water and would be less likely to see the obstruction or be able to dodge it.

    Returning to the offending lifeguard, I would point out that, unlike the track, there's someone in attendance at the pool whose responsibility is to keep the pool safe for everyone there. I would suggest, probably rather strongly, that such an attendant who stood by and watched another patron place an obstruction in the path of an unsuspecting swimmer without a) instructing that person to stop doing it and b) causing the obstruction to be removed from the lane, was failing in his responsibility and putting the swimmer at risk of injury. I would then assert that the swimmer in question would have every right to remove the obstruction. I would also assert that he would have every right to be angry about it, both with the lifeguard who wasn't doing his job, and with the idiot in the aerobics class who didn't respect the safety of the other pool users.

    I would guess at this point that the lifeguard would claim that he didn't see the obstruction or the water aerobes invading the swimmers' space. I would, of course, ask what the hell the lifeguard was doing, when he was supposed to be watching the pool. Would he also not notice someone drowning, which can happen rather quickly? I would express my serious concerns with this lifeguard's qualifications!

    All this, over the lifeguard doing something so stupid as you suggested.

    But I wouldn't stop there. Somewhere in there I would ask how the president would feel about his facility paying for a swimmer's visit to the emergency room to have his fingers x-rayed and taped up when the swimmer hit such an obstruction with his hand. I would then point out that there had been several complaints about the water aerobes intruding upon other swimmers' space, and that the aquatics staff had failed to remedy the problem. "It isn't just me complaining," I would say. "It's an ongoing problem. But I can't help but wonder whether this suspension from the pool over something this stupid is some sort of retribution for my cmplaints." Then I would turn and eyeball the lifeguard angrily as I awaited a response.

    I would explain to the president of the facility that many swimmers there felt that the facility was unfriendly to them in its neglect of their comfort and safety, even though the facility made a point of advertising lap swimming as one of their major benefits. I would point out that their membership coordinators even used the pool and its availability to lap swimmers as a selling point during tours. Then I would suggest that doing so, when the facility obviously didn't give a rat's ass about lap swimmers after they had their money, constituted at least a mild form of fraud.

    It's possible that I would get a response that the pool had many different types of patrons, and that, try as they might, they couldn't keep everyone happy. My response would be that they weren't trying very hard, that all any of the lap swimmers were asking was to be able to swim laps unobstructed, without being kicked by people with no respect for others' space and having objects placed in our way. All any of us want is for the facility to live up to its obligations under the moral contract it made when it advertised a service and took our money for that service. "Is this facility not good for its word?" I would ask. Sure, I understand that the facility makes no guarantee concerning access to the pool, but they still have a moral responsibility to try to live up to their sales pitch.

    Otherwise they're just liars.

    At the very least I would expect an apology from the lifeguard. For something this stupid, I would rather see him dismissed, or at least disciplined, maybe suspended for the same length of time I was barred from the pool. If the management of the facility cared as little about its patrons as the lifeguard in question, perhaps I would lose this battle. But I would make them work for the victory, and I would say whatever I could to make them question their right to live among human beings.

    If you can't tell, Emmit, you made me a little angry with your response. I hope that, now that you have a little better picture of the situation, you see things differently.

    To repeat, I've regularly used six different YMCAs and done laps regularly at another four pools that weren't YMCA. Out of ten pools in five different cities, this is the only one where I have encountered such problems. That's why I adopted my signature...

  2. #22
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    Hey, bummer Ian, your thread got hijacked. Not the first time that has happened and I am sure it won’t be the last either.

    I agree with your original premise, lane lines don’t seem to be used to the fullest potential anymore, especially in meets worth tapering for. Nobody I know enjoys racing in a wavy, choppy pool. I can recall swimming at the University of Michigan in the early 90s when they had in triple lane lines at a zone meet. Talk about a smooth pool. At the USMS Short Course Nationals in Nashville (also in the early 90s), just prior to the first race of the first day, they tightened all the double-lane lines. When was the last time you saw that? As a result that was a fast pool with fast times (there are others worth noting but Robert Peel turned a 19.83 and 44.44 for the 50/100 free at that meet).

    I think what you are asking is to please give us pool conditions (that are controllable) to race in that will allow us to go as fast as our training and taper will take us.

  3. #23
    Very Active Member cinc310's Avatar
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    Remember the 1970's when their was no such thing as lap swimming and if you did not workout on an age group or school team you could not swim in lane line. I remember swimming on a rec period where you had to put up with the kids and there were no lane lines back then. Health club pools still have few line lanes and the priority is to people in water aerobics there. But I think that some people who barely can swim benefit more from the aerobic classes. In fact some of those that go to the lap swimming should instead be involved with the aerobic classes because they can barely do 8 or 10 laps and usually have to stop 3 minutes after doing one lap. And different pools have different priorities, in my city the eastside of the town gets a lot more lap swimmers or people interested in aerobics since they are more middle class:however, the westside of town im many places, the rec pools are geared more toward kids since the area is less middle class.

  4. #24
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    Shaky,

    I agree with your position about the lifeguard, but a reality check -it is pretty obvious that the lifeguard isn't passing the information along to the Aerobics instructor OR the aerobics instructor doesn't care. Either way I would have to assume that you haven't tried to talk to the management of the facility (since your hypothetical reply to Emmett) which should be your next step. If you feel strongly about something, don't rely on someone else to present your message. The fact that you feel that there is a risk to your well being, it is in your best interest to notify as many people as possible. Sorry to have to say this, if you were kicked from an exerciser in the aquatics class and received a serious injury, the parties at fault would mostly be the lifeguard and instructor, the management can claim ignorance (not the best defense but could work). If you let the management know there is a problem, then you have several individuals responsible and you might see more action. Lets face it typically your lifeguard is a teenager (not always, but more often than not) that may not be that mature or responsible/professional about their job, but the facility management is or should be very aware of the reprecussions of their failure to fulfill their duties. As I stated Information and education are you best weapons in remedying this, take some responsibility if you want to see some change, it may or may not happen but at least you tried. Good luck swimming, maybe once this Iraq situation is over you will be able to buy some used body armor to protect yourself from the military surplus stores.

  5. #25
    Participating Member ShinobDood's Avatar
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    Woohoo....AquaRobics RULES!!! Tell ya what.. I would prefer to have 14 ladies using two lanes for AquaX or Aquarobics, as oposed to having 2 Jackass Synchro Swimmers taking two lanes in a 50m pool. At least the AquaX peeps dont have those HORRRRIBLE Loud speakers, Blaring Muzak Rejected noise and yelling at the top of their lungs.
    Anyone witness the Olympic Trials in 2000? At the end of the trials the synchro team got out there to do there schtick and someone..."accidentally" pulled the plug on their toonz... Classic... Hey, it wasn't me! Kudos to that dood tho.....

    By the way.. who did trip Mary decker?

    Shinob out!
    Last edited by ShinobDood; April 11th, 2003 at 07:20 PM.

  6. #26
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  7. #27
    Very Active Member Shaky's Avatar
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    Originally posted by kaelonj
    If you feel strongly about something, don't rely on someone else to present your message. The fact that you feel that there is a risk to your well being, it is in your best interest to notify as many people as possible. Sorry to have to say this, if you were kicked from an exerciser in the aquatics class and received a serious injury, the parties at fault would mostly be the lifeguard and instructor, the management can claim ignorance (not the best defense but could work). If you let the management know there is a problem, then you have several individuals responsible and you might see more action.
    Actually, I just deal with the problems for the most part and swim on past them.

    I have spoken with an assistant aquatics director and some of the membership coordinators about problems in the pool (not specifically being kicked by the ladies, but other problems I haven't even mentioned), and I have come to the conclusion that there IS no solution. This pool is just too crowded. They have too many people wanting to use it, and it is beyond their ability to control. All I can really do is ask for the things that can be fixed, like tightening the lane lines, and remove other nuisances myself, as they happen.

    Do I really think there's a safety issue? No, not likely. Like I said, these ladies are weak, and the kicks are more a nuisance than anything else after you get over the initial surprise. Likewise, the floaties in my lane are more nuisance than safety problem.

    Then why did I raise the safety issue a few posts back? Emmett suggested that my removing the offending item from the pool was somehow offensive, and a punishable offense at that. I was merely demonstrating how difficult it would be for a lifeguard or facilities manager to justify such punishment. There is no way the lifeguard could spin his side of it so that it would stand up to the facts of the case.

    You see, I don't push these issues very hard because I try to be a nice, reasonable person, and they aren't, for the most part, worth wasting my time. If someone attacked me the way Emmett suggested, however, THAT would warrant the kind of all out assault on the situation and that person's character that you see written above. That would make it worth my time.

    I guess it's a good thing for both of us that Emmett is not my lifeguard.

    Sorry for my part in hijacking Ian's thread. Sometimes you just go where the conversation takes you.

  8. #28
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    I honestly believe that if Emmet was the lifeguard you would be very fortunate in the fact that you wouldn't have any of the problems you are experiencing. As you have said you have tried to solve other problems, but no action taken so I guess its either live with it or move on (As you have said that is not a very realistic option to go somewhere else). Good luck.

    Jeff

    My apologies to Ian !

  9. #29
    Very Active Member emmett's Avatar
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    On the general subject of lane line tightness - I know a number of people who, just as a matter of course, carry in their equipment a ratchet wrench ($8 at Home Depot) of the correct size for tightening lane lines. There are many multi-use pools where the lane lines are switched out several times during the day by different groups, not all of which are careful about getting them re-tightened properly. Here in Texas, many pools operate without lifeguards on deck so being self sufficient in this respect can be quite useful for the swimmer. One suggestion: check first with management to be sure it is OK for you to tighten offending lane lines - in most cases it should be no problem.
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  10. #30
    Very Active Member emmett's Avatar
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    I debated whether to post this or to respond to Shaky privately by email. As this situation (coexistence of in-water groups with differing needs and activities) is common, and often results in undesirable tensions between participants, I perceive others may find value in my response. In the long run, all of us having an interest in the use pools for real swimming, whether it is lap swimming or organized workouts, are all affected by how the rest of the world, particularly facility adminstrators see us. One person's actions have a ripple effect on others.

    First, in a facility for which I had responsibility, it would not be the lifeguard (likely a college student) who would assess a suspension of privileges. He/she would simply be the dispassionate observer/messenger. It would be me, the facility director, that would make that call. As someone responsible for the safety and comfort of ALL the facility patrons I would have three major considerations in this situation, as follows:

    Safety - My comment about being suspended from the facility was motivated by your response to Jean's comment about aerobics people who "lay their equipment (woggles, those leg weight things) on the lane line". You said that the way you handle it is to "stop, grab whatever it is and hurl it to the deck at the far side of the pool". I make the assumption that throwing of ANY object is specifically prohibited by the rules at your pool. It definitely is at every pool I've ever worked at. Throwing something like leg weights, which could do real harm to any person on the receiving end, however unintentional, would not just be a violation of the rules but, clearly, an egregious violation.

    Civility - Among other things, my responsibility as a facility operator would be to quickly eliminate uncivilized/anti-social behavior on the part of any patron. It would seem that your original post was intended to show that you were being proactive to solve your problem. It would also seem that your actions were calculated to dramatize to the aerobics people your displeasure and frustration with the situation. By your description of the reaction the aerobics people have to your behavior, it would appear that when you engage in such a display you are successful. I also get the impression that you are aware that your actions were not exactly perceived, by the aerobics people, as civilized.

    Pattern of behavior - You don't say so specifically, but your post implies that you have engaged in such a demonstration on more than one occasion. While I can conceive of circumstances where a first occurrence might only receive a warning, I can't imagine allowing repetitive occurrences.

    Acceptable alternatives to hurling equipment include such actions as 1) simply pushing the offending item back into the lane from whence it came, 2) if the item is floating, unrestricted, in your lane (as your later post suggests) you could grab it and take it to the end of your lane and place it on the deck (you might even time this such that you are towing it to the end farthest from the person who belongs to the equipment), 3) you could stop, get the attention of the person who belongs to the equipment and ask her to remove it from your lane, 4) you could tow the equipment over to the instructor and hand it to her and ask that she remind her participants to keep tighter control of their equipment. Any of these avenues would serve to remove the offending item from your lane, cause no hazard for other patrons, demonstrate (though not as dramatically) your displeasure and frustration and be accepted by nearly anyone as being within the bounds of civilized behavior.

    One question does come to mind: Your posts would suggest that you feel that the largest contributing factor to your frustration is really that the lifeguard is falling short in doing his job. Actually, in most facilities it would be the instructor that would have front line responsibility for keeping her group and their equipment within their designated area. Be that as it may, clearly some staff member on the scene is falling short. The question is: why you would direct your dramatization at the aerobics people instead of the staff or management?

    In your later post, you allude to aerobics people who "repeatedly threw things over in your path as you tried to swim" likening it to people who stand by the indoor track and toss things onto the track. You don't say so specifically, but you seem to be suggesting the aerobics people are intentionally putting stuff in your lane with the intent to disrupt your swimming. Though I strongly doubt that their equipment repeatedly gets into your lane through willful intent, if this is, in fact, what they are doing then it is clearly wrong and is just as uncivil as hurling of equipment. And, clearly, it would still not excuse hurling of equipment.

    Another impression I get is that you think that your action of hurling equipment is completely justified. There is nothing in the scenario you have described that justifies your unsafe and uncivil actions. Even if everyone else is in the wrong, that isn't justification. I would be extremely surprised if any facility manager read your post and said to themselves "That guy sure knows how to handle a frustrating situation. He was completely within his rights to hurl equipment across the pool."

    In regards to your hypothetical meeting between yourself, the lifeguard and the facility manager (assuming, for the moment, the facility manager is me) I offer the following: If my lifeguard was failing in his responsibilities, I would take corrective action. If the aerobics instructor was failing to keep her group's activities and equipment properly corraled in their assigned lanes, I would take corrective action. If there were aerobics people demonstrating unsafe or uncivilized behavior in my facility, I would take corrective action. And, no doubt, these problems would all be solved by the time you returned from your suspension.
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  11. #31
    Very Active Member Matt S's Avatar
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    Wink Another reason for fast times

    Steve,

    We've recently become a bit more conscious of measuring pools to ensure that they are regulation distances. (I know this because I am on the SLAM BOD and we recently hosted a SCY meet.) A real concern is that if your pool uses a bulkhead, or anything that might flex, that tightening the lanes lines too tight might cause it to bow in the middle to a non-regulation distance.

    So...maybe those multiple lanes lines all tightened to a guitar string tension contributed to fast times by some means other than reduced turbulence. Just a thought...

    Shakey: I had one thought re your post. Is your workout style suited to the conditions as you find them? I know that back when I worshipped low rest intervals, swim every lap on the edge of puking my guts out, ANY distranction in my lane was an irritant. If you are following a similar prescription, maybe you can reduce the friction (and improve your swimming) by doing some lower speed drill work when the aqua-crowd is at its densest. I know that if I am not trying to hold an interval, I am a whole lot more tolerant of rec swimmers and their toys bouncing in front of me if I am doing hand lead TI drills. If I know another big group is about to share the water, I try to schedule my workout to do stuff like that there when they are in the pool. Just a thought; I could be, and frequently am completely wrong (just ask my wife ).

    One boring sea story, then I'll go. Back when I was an age grouper (when dinosaurs walked the earth) our team was practicing in the municipal pool, which was enourmous--25 yard wide, very long. We used the central third; the rest of the pool was open to rec swimmers. We were swimming a set of haul a__, max sprint 25's fly, from the dive. I was the first swimmer in my lane, and this little ole' rec swimmer meandered into the swim team area (probably wondering why no one was using all that empty water). Well, needless to say, he didn't see us, and (with my head down) neither I nor any of the life guards saw him, and WACKO!! I speared the guy right in the back with the top of my head at full speed (think greek trireme ramming a persian galley at the battle of Salamis). Fortunately, both of us were stunned, but unhurt. We continued with out workout, and I'd bet the rec swimmer was a little more aware of where the swim team was working out from that point on.

    Matt

  12. #32
    Very Active Member Shaky's Avatar
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    Re: Another reason for fast times

    Originally posted by Matt S
    Is your workout style suited to the conditions as you find them? I know that back when I worshipped low rest intervals, swim every lap on the edge of puking my guts out, ANY distranction in my lane was an irritant. If you are following a similar prescription, maybe you can reduce the friction (and improve your swimming) by doing some lower speed drill work when the aqua-crowd is at its densest.
    I agree, and I have pretty much given up on trying to hold intervals. I have been tempted to try to resume interval training on those rare occasions where there are only two of us in a lane (so that we can swim sides instead of circles), but inevitably a third person joins us within a few minutes and destroys that opportunity. You're right: once I gave up on interval work, there was less tension, so now I just swim longer distances.

    Emmett: Perhaps it would be good to have you running our pool after all. A tighter ship would certainly help mitigate some of the problems. A few points, though...

    There is no prohibition against throwing things at this pool. The lifeguards regularly hurl equipment across the pool when straightening up (to land it in the vicinity of the cages where they're stored), and the kids in the open swim lanes on weekends frequently play by grabbing exercise equipment and throwing it back and forth. That's one way it ends up in the lap lanes. When I mentioned that no one had said anything about it, I was referring to the water aerobes; the lifeguards wouldn't care.

    Responding to your alternatives, I HAVE pushed the items back in their lanes. They just put them back. Considering that I'm being shocked out of my mental training zone, I'm usually not ready for conversation, so talking to the instructor or the ladies about keeping their stuff off the lane right then would probably go much worse than tossing it. I don't think I would be polite.

    You asked: "...why you would direct your dramatization at the aerobics people instead of the staff or management?" I have spoken with the staff and management. They do little or nothing about the problems. I thought I had made that clear. It's pretty much a lost cause, up to the individual swimmers to fend for themselves.

    You suggested that the actions of one lap swimmer affects how people would see all of them. You also said in a previous message that lap swimmers, as a group, gave you more problems than anyone else. Here's something for you to consider: how much of that perception is your own bias?

    There is a certain legitimacy afforded to members of an organized group that is denied to individuals operating outside group boundaries. What I have seen, at this pool and others, is that when lap swimmers have complaints, they are largely swept aside. If a swimmer on a team has a complaint, however, he will tell his coach, and the coach's complaint will be taken seriously. The same complaint will not be handled the same way coming from a coach or instructor and from an individual swimmer, because our voice is viewed as less legitimate. The attitude seems to be "Oh, he's just a lap swimmer. We can't keep them happy anyway."

    In order for a lap swimmer's complaint to have the same weight as the coach, it has to be coordinated with other complaints with other swimmers. If the coach of a team of 30 complains, the staff thinks that he speaks for 30 people. If a lap swimmer complains, his complaint won't be taken seriously unless he can gather thirty other lap swimmers to corroborate his statement and go in a group to complain. That's nearly impossible.

    Suppose that a number of lap swimmers go individually to complain. Since it isn't a coordinated effort, they'll probably have a variety of complaints. If the swim coach were to come to the staff with the same set of complaints, they would still be taken more seriously, while the group of individual complaints would be dismissed as the ramblings of malcontents who would never be happy. "Yeah, those guys will complain about anything. You can't make them happy. Why bother."

    Many of us have seen our requests and complaints ignored so often on this basis that all that's left for us is to defend our rights, sometimes taking matters into our own hands. If you see a lap swimmer acting in what you consider an uncivil manner, it's quite possible that he or she has been ignored, or at least perceives the situation that way. You think it's antisocial behavior, when in reality it's frustration at the staff's failure to do their jobs.

    Try ignoring complaints or suggestions from an organized group the same way individual complaints are handled and see what happens. I don't think that lap swimmers are any more uncivil than other people; some of us are just fed up with being treated as the pool's red-headed stepchildren.

  13. #33
    USMS Member since 2003 gull's Avatar
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    For some reason the pool at these facilities is not viewed as a piece of exercise equipment (and as such a limited resource). Imagine treating the track or Nautilus equipment this way. The best solution is scheduling dedicated adult lap swimming time that is strictly enforced.

    By the way, I would be interested in the heart rates achieved by the typical water aerobics participant (i.e. not Evander Holyfield).

  14. #34
    Very Active Member Dominick Aielloeaver's Avatar
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    Originally posted by kaelonj
    Maybe I can shed a little light and help redirect some comments. First off the saying "If you are not part of the solution then you are part of the problem"really holds true. If you have a problem with the water aerobics (We call it AquaX) you need to bring this to the facility managements attention (maybe you have I'm not sure - and if you have and they haven't changed then you know where their priorties are). Shaky, have you tried talking to the instructor about the equipement and having participants too close to the lane line, the instructor might not be aware of this, they obviously have a duty to ensure they are conducting their class in a safe manner, also let the lifeguard know, once again they are there to ensure everyone's safety.

    Aquageek, last I checked water aerobics was exercise not a sport.
    Complaining about a change in water current/conditions because of there exercises, what's next complaining about a wake from a fast swimmer next to you. And your last comment about how they look at you when they get splashed which annoys them, just as their vortex bothers you.
    Your comment about the fitness level really bothers me, as if all Master swimmers look like they should be on the cover of fitness/shape magazine. The reason maybe someone can't get in or out of the pool by themselves could be injury or other health problems, if you have been to swim meets not every master swimmer gets in or out of the pool by themselves yet they still let them compete.
    The fact that people are getting in the water and trying something, any movement is good. Have you ever tried any of the exercises you might be surprised, some of them really do work on that important core strength and body balance. Some of the exercises do look easy but if you work on controling your body properly they do become more difficult. The other fact that maybe these people aren't as adapt to having fun, or they see their workout as a little social time, whats wrong with that ?
    The pool temp will always be an issue (I agree 84 is too warm) most swimmers like to see 80 or so, AquaX people (and swim lesson) like mid 80's so keeping at 84 is a bit of a compromise leaning more towards the AquaX and Lesson people - but they probably make up the bulk of the pool users, not the lap swimmers.

    These are my personal and professional opinions. I am an aquatics manager, I don't manage a Y but the pool at another fitness center. All of our AquaX instructors are certified (AEA) some are even land based aerobic instructors. Not all facilities have the luxury I do, well trained aquatic professionals and the resources and freedom to ensure we provide quality aquatic programming. I used Aqua exercises to recently rehab knee surgery (ACL reconstruction from a hamstring graft and repair of a torn medial meniscus) I was able to start running slightly in under 4 months and was back playing water polo in just over 4 months. My first day in the pool I could barely get in and out because of the knee surgery but within 2 weeks it wasn't a problem - I give a lot of credit to a fast recovery because of doing some of the exercises that are done in what some people would deem useless water aerobic classes.

  15. #35
    Very Active Member Dominick Aielloeaver's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Dominick Aielloeaver
    I thought was sincere and honest. And Well Thought out.

  16. #36
    Very Active Member Rnovitske's Avatar
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    Originally posted by emmett


    It has been my experience that lap swimmers tend to be the most demanding (in some cases, militant) patrons in the facility.

    My experience has been (and when facility operators compare notes I see the same trend) that the people who cause the greatest headaches for the operator generally come from the ranks of lap swimmers.
    WOW, this says a lot! Maybe we should try to examine why this experience?

    In the three county pools our team swims in, we have no problems with the aerobics. Everyone gets along for the most part.

    However, our experience has been that the lap swimmers are the greatest headache because they complain more, because pools are generally set up and operated to be least accommodating to them.

    Also, if the lanes are lose, the lane wrench is kept in a place we have access to, so we can tighten the lanes ourselves.

  17. #37
    Very Active Member cinc310's Avatar
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    There are so many different groups using pools these days. Back in the 1970's many pools mainly ran only summer programs for kids to learn to swim and had free rec time. The only people that workout were age group AAU or summer league swimmers and of course there were few masters teams and almost no water exercise classes or lap swimming The rec pool I workout is great for the lap swimmers since there are no masters team or age group team and the water aeorbic classes usally workout at a different time and there is only a summer league team for the kids. Also, rec swimming in the summertime is on different hours than lap swimming. Lap swimmers are not all that bad at swimming some of them can swim better than some of the adults on master teams. I understand that maybe some of them get out of hand but not all of us can swim on masters teams because of our work schedules or the nearest team is 20 miles plus from where we live. I'm a lap swimmer and workout on my own and have done about 3 masters meets since I join masters mainly to do that and like the Swim Magazine.

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