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Thread: The Butterfly Lane

  1. #621
    Very Active Member swimcat's Avatar
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    Re: The Butterfly Lane

    thanks. when I run out of air. I gasp on the backstroke leg, although head is out of water. my backstroke is my worst leg and stroke.

  2. #622
    Very Active Member mlabresh's Avatar
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    Re: The Butterfly Lane

    I have the same problem, swimcat. I'd rather keep doing fly than have that backstroke leg in there!
    ~Megan

  3. #623
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    Re: The Butterfly Lane

    Swam 1,000 yards of fly last week. Nothing special. But it feels good to be ready early for the swim season. Maybe I will get closer to the times of you others. I think I am around 30 minutes for now. Thanks for your inspiration last year, especially Elaine and That Guy.

  4. #624
    aka Elaine-iaK & Aqua Dog ElaineK's Avatar
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    Re: The Butterfly Lane

    Quote Originally Posted by Yosemite View Post
    Swam 1,000 yards of fly last week. Nothing special. But it feels good to be ready early for the swim season. Maybe I will get closer to the times of you others. I think I am around 30 minutes for now. Thanks for your inspiration last year, especially Elaine and That Guy.
    Awesome! You are a true Butternut now!
    http://ElaineiaKsTravels.wordpress.com

    ~ Believing in your dreams can be far more rewarding than living by your limitations ~Karla Peterson

  5. #625
    sǝssɐןb ɹǝʇʇǝq ʇǝb That Guy's Avatar
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    Re: The Butterfly Lane

    Quote Originally Posted by Yosemite View Post
    Swam 1,000 yards of fly last week. Nothing special.
    Those two sentences make no sense together. Well done Yosemite!
    "I blame you, James!" - knelson

  6. #626
    Very Active Member mcnair's Avatar
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    Re: The Butterfly Lane

    Quote Originally Posted by mlabresh View Post
    I have the same problem, swimcat. I'd rather keep doing fly than have that backstroke leg in there!
    I'll trade you my backstroke for your fly; not that my backstroke would help you all that much... just that my fly needs HELP!

  7. #627
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    Re: The Butterfly Lane

    Thinking that I need to do some weights in order to help my arms and shoulders for my fly. Any suggestions? I am relatively new to lifting.

  8. #628
    sǝssɐןb ɹǝʇʇǝq ʇǝb That Guy's Avatar
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    Re: The Butterfly Lane

    Quote Originally Posted by shannalee80 View Post
    Thinking that I need to do some weights in order to help my arms and shoulders for my fly. Any suggestions? I am relatively new to lifting.
    Develop a strong dolphin kick.
    "I blame you, James!" - knelson

  9. #629
    Very Active Member arthur's Avatar
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    Re: The Butterfly Lane

    Quote Originally Posted by shannalee80 View Post
    Thinking that I need to do some weights in order to help my arms and shoulders for my fly. Any suggestions? I am relatively new to lifting.
    Dips and wide grip pullups are two of the best upper body exercises for fly and all strokes. Adding pendlay rows to my workout also dropped 0.5 seconds from my 50 fly time (http://stronglifts.com/how-to-perfor...ect-technique/). If you think you need stronger shoulders you can also do add the military press.

  10. #630
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    Re: The Butterfly Lane

    Quote Originally Posted by shannalee80 View Post
    Thinking that I need to do some weights in order to help my arms and shoulders for my fly. Any suggestions? I am relatively new to lifting.
    I suggest that it depends on what shoulder muscles need help. If bringing the arms forward is fatiguing, then you might want to do an exercise that mimicks that such as raising a dumbell (or an elastice cord) in each arm from your waist out to your sides up to your shoulder level or slightly higher. Some trainers caution against going too high above your shoulders so that you don't pinch the top of the shoulders too much. If you want to increase your force on the bottom of your arm stroke, then mimick that with straight arm (elbows slightly bent) cable pulldowns. OR you can lie on your back and pull on elastic cords to mimick your arm stroke towards your waist. You can do this one at home. I suggest you take it easy the first week on two with any new shoulder exercise.

    I agree with That Guy that a strong kick is important. Then you can also help yourself with front and back core strengthening. Let us know how it goes for you! I have resorted at times to doing situps and leg extensions at the same time to mimick the core and leg requirements. That's a pretty tough exercise but it works wonders for butterfly.

  11. #631
    Very Active Member __steve__'s Avatar
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    Re: The Butterfly Lane

    Quote Originally Posted by arthur View Post
    Dips and wide grip pullups are two of the best upper body exercises for fly and all strokes. Adding pendlay rows to my workout also dropped 0.5 seconds from my 50 fly time (http://stronglifts.com/how-to-perfor...ect-technique/). If you think you need stronger shoulders you can also do add the military press.
    Good info!

  12. #632
    Very Active Member Jimbosback's Avatar
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    Re: The Butterfly Lane

    I have aquestion regarding stroke recovery.

    I used to (until like a week and a half ago!) really throw my arms forward quickly, trying to land my hands softly. It occurred to me (while swimming fly with fins) that maybe I was wasting energy doing this. Since then, I have been recovering my arms more slowly, and it seems like I have a little more endurance and a little more power in my pull. I am also about 1/2 second faster on my 25s since doing this. (This might just be a coincidence and a result of training.)

    So the question(s) is: How aggressively do you thrust arms forward in recovery? Is softer better?

  13. #633
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    Re: The Butterfly Lane

    Quote Originally Posted by Jimbosback View Post
    I have aquestion regarding stroke recovery.

    I used to (until like a week and a half ago!) really throw my arms forward quickly, trying to land my hands softly. It occurred to me (while swimming fly with fins) that maybe I was wasting energy doing this. Since then, I have been recovering my arms more slowly, and it seems like I have a little more endurance and a little more power in my pull. I am also about 1/2 second faster on my 25s since doing this. (This might just be a coincidence and a result of training.)

    So the question(s) is: How aggressively do you thrust arms forward in recovery? Is softer better?
    At cruising speed I try to recover my arms as effortlessly as possible. At sprinting speed I fire all my lasers and go all out. There's not much in between.
    "I blame you, James!" - knelson

  14. #634
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    Re: The Butterfly Lane

    The faster you bring your arms forward, the more momentum you create against your body going forward. This will tend you slow you down. You want to clear the water when your arms are out of course, but other than that you may only want to bring them forward as fast as you must to keep your pace. I recently really emphasized my kick per That Guy's suggestion and knocked off one stroke on my 25 meter moderate pace. If only I had the core strength of a real swimmer.

  15. #635
    Very Active Member Jimbosback's Avatar
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    Re: The Butterfly Lane

    Quote Originally Posted by Yosemite View Post
    The faster you bring your arms forward, the more momentum you create against your body going forward. This will tend you slow you down. You want to clear the water when your arms are out of course, but other than that you may only want to bring them forward as fast as you must to keep your pace. I recently really emphasized my kick per That Guy's suggestion and knocked off one stroke on my 25 meter moderate pace. If only I had the core strength of a real swimmer.

    Thanks, That Guy. And this is what I am experiencing. I was definitely slowing myself down by throwing my hands forward too much. It didn't really become apparent until my kick got stronger.

  16. #636
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    Re: The Butterfly Lane

    Quote Originally Posted by Jimbosback View Post
    Thanks, That Guy. And this is what I am experiencing. I was definitely slowing myself down by throwing my hands forward too much. It didn't really become apparent until my kick got stronger.
    The park entrance fee applies to all visitors. If you arrive in your private car, van, pickup truck, or RV, the entrance fee is $20 per car. This is valid for unlimited entries to Yosemite for seven days, and includes all occupants of the car.
    Otherwise, entrance fees are as follows:
    $10 per person if arriving on foot, horseback, bicycle, motorcycle, or on a non-commercial bus (free for those 15 years old and younger).
    Commercial tours pay the following rates (a special permit is required):

    • Commercial sedan (up to six seats): $25 (plus $10 per person)
    • Commercial van (7-15 seats): $125
    • Commercial mini bus (16-25 seats): $200
    • Commercial motor coach (more than 26 seats): $300

    (Note that fees are based on capacity, not on occupancy.)
    We accept cash, checks, traveler's checks, and credit cards (Visa, MasterCard, American Express, and Discover).

    In 2013, entrance fees will be waived on:


    • January 21 (Martin Luther King, Jr. Day)
    • April 22-26 (National Park Week)
    • August 25 (National Park Service Founders Day)
    • September 28 (National Public Lands Day)
    • November 9-11 (Veterans Day weekend)


    Other Passes
    These passes admit the pass owner and any accompanying passengers in a private car. Purchase these passes at any park entrance station.
    Yosemite Pass (annual pass): $40
    America the Beautiful--National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Annual Pass: $80
    This is an annual admission pass covering admission and standard amenity fees. This replaces the National Parks Pass and Golden Eagle Pass.
    Annual Pass--Military: Free
    This is an annual admission pass covering admission and standard amenity fees for all active military personnel and their dependents. (For active duty military personnel and dependents with proper identification (CAC Card or DD Form 1173).)

    Access Pass: Free
    This is a lifetime admission and discount pass for US citizens or permanent residents with permanent disabilities. (You can also get this pass by mail for
    $10.)

    Senior Pass: $10
    This is a lifetime admission and discount pass for US citizens or permanent residents who are age 62 or older. (You can also get this pass by mail for an additional $10.)
    "I blame you, James!" - knelson

  17. #637
    Very Active Member philoswimmer's Avatar
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    Re: The Butterfly Lane

    Quote Originally Posted by That Guy View Post
    The park entrance fee applies to all visitors. If you arrive in your private car, van, pickup truck, or RV, the entrance fee is $20 per car. This is valid for unlimited entries to Yosemite for seven days, and includes all occupants of the car.
    Otherwise, entrance fees are as follows:
    $10 per person if arriving on foot, horseback, bicycle, motorcycle, or on a non-commercial bus (free for those 15 years old and younger).
    Commercial tours pay the following rates (a special permit is required):

    • Commercial sedan (up to six seats): $25 (plus $10 per person)
    • Commercial van (7-15 seats): $125
    • Commercial mini bus (16-25 seats): $200
    • Commercial motor coach (more than 26 seats): $300

    (Note that fees are based on capacity, not on occupancy.)
    We accept cash, checks, traveler's checks, and credit cards (Visa, MasterCard, American Express, and Discover).

    In 2013, entrance fees will be waived on:


    • January 21 (Martin Luther King, Jr. Day)
    • April 22-26 (National Park Week)
    • August 25 (National Park Service Founders Day)
    • September 28 (National Public Lands Day)
    • November 9-11 (Veterans Day weekend)


    Other Passes
    These passes admit the pass owner and any accompanying passengers in a private car. Purchase these passes at any park entrance station.
    Yosemite Pass (annual pass): $40
    America the Beautiful--National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Annual Pass: $80
    This is an annual admission pass covering admission and standard amenity fees. This replaces the National Parks Pass and Golden Eagle Pass.
    Annual Pass--Military: Free
    This is an annual admission pass covering admission and standard amenity fees for all active military personnel and their dependents. (For active duty military personnel and dependents with proper identification (CAC Card or DD Form 1173).)

    Access Pass: Free
    This is a lifetime admission and discount pass for US citizens or permanent residents with permanent disabilities. (You can also get this pass by mail for
    $10.)

    Senior Pass: $10
    This is a lifetime admission and discount pass for US citizens or permanent residents who are age 62 or older. (You can also get this pass by mail for an additional $10.)
    It's a metaphor, right? You think you're going faster by going by car, but really, you're just paying more and you have to wait in a long line. Arriving on foot, horseback, bicycle, motorcycle, or on a non-commercial bus is actually cheaper *and* faster.

    Slow arms on butterfly for the win!

  18. #638
    sǝssɐןb ɹǝʇʇǝq ʇǝb That Guy's Avatar
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    Re: The Butterfly Lane

    Quote Originally Posted by philoswimmer View Post
    It's a metaphor, right? You think you're going faster by going by car, but really, you're just paying more and you have to wait in a long line. Arriving on foot, horseback, bicycle, motorcycle, or on a non-commercial bus is actually cheaper *and* faster.

    Slow arms on butterfly for the win!
    Each year, 15 to 20 visitor rescues are directly associated with unprepared victims finding themselves in the water either on purpose (swimming, boating, rafting) or accidentally (falling while hiking, crossing streams, scrambling on rocks). As a matter of fact, water-related accidents are the second most common cause of death in the park! (Motor vehicle accidents are the first.)
    Thousands of people visit Yosemite every year to enjoy the beautiful waterfalls, rivers, and creeks. Enjoy your visit safely by learning about potential risks and following simple safety tips.
    Many accidents happen in places where hazards are not obvious. Keep in mind that one misstep on a rock, even above a seemingly calm pool, may result in inability to escape from a hazard downstream.
    Often, people do not experience fear when standing next to water in the same way that they would if they were standing on the edge of a precipitous cliff. However, intentional or unintentional entrance into the water can be as dangerous as falling off a cliff.
    What are the hazards?
    Be aware that mountain water is extremely cold, despite hot air temperatures. Strong swimmers may quickly become too weak from hypothermia to swim. Even professional swiftwater rescuers wearing layers of insulation sometimes struggle to stay warm!
    Even a slow current will take you where you may not want to go. Remember, "slow" is a relative term in the mountains... you probably won't be able to swim to shore or away from a hazard faster than the current is taking you towards it.
    Watch for water hazards, like submerged tree branches, abandoned cables, or narrow gaps between rocks, which can trap you or part of you underwater, causing hypothermia and even death. The pressure from even a "slow" current can be enough to immobilize you against an obstacle and keep you submerged.
    How do I survive?
    Follow posted signs. If a sign says "NO SWIMMING," don't swim or wade! Hazards are often invisible on the surface and calm water may hide dangerous conditions. Areas are closed to swimming and wading in places (like Emerald Pool, above Vernal Fall) where multiple incidents occur each year.
    Confidence in a familiar environment leads to danger in an unfamiliar one. For example, a strong ocean swimmer with no knowledge of swiftwater hazards might assume that their swimming skill is all they need. Itís not!
    If you fall in, use the defensive position: on your back, feet pointing downstream and on the surface (can you see your toes?).
    If boating, wear the required personal protective equipment (PPE): A life-jacket (personal floatation device or PFD) appropriate to the activity is the absolute minimum. Other equipment may include helmet, wetsuit, whistle, and knife.
    "I blame you, James!" - knelson

  19. #639
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    Re: The Butterfly Lane

    I've been swimming most of my life, and butterfly is my favorite stroke. However, I am one of those people who equate the 200 fly with the Boston Marathon. I applaud you! I competed it for the first and last time my freshman year in college. The worst part was both swims were on the same day. I told my coach that after that, I was fine being a sprint specialist.

  20. #640
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    Re: The Butterfly Lane

    *REAL* men swim the 200 fly.

    smart men watch it.

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