Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 41 to 60 of 77

Thread: Dryland Training For Swimmers

  1. #41
    Won Slowest Swimmer Award bzaks1424's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Libertyville, IL
    Posts
    675
    Blog Entries
    33

    Re: Dryland Training For Swimmers

    Quote Originally Posted by guppy View Post
    I think I got the terminology wrong. I mean a three point plank on the ball, i.e. only one hand on the ground.
    I was trying to imagine maintaining balance on a physioball with just one hand and your body flat in the air.
    "Fran operated under the assumption that one’s ability to cope with the travails of daily life fluctuates in direct proportion to one’s willingness to work through hurt." -Ian Prichard

  2. #42
    Very Active Member guppy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    137

    Re: Dryland Training For Swimmers

    Quote Originally Posted by bzaks1424 View Post
    I was trying to imagine maintaining balance on a physioball with just one hand and your body flat in the air.
    Of all the routines on the physioball I think this is one of the toughest, if not the toughest.

  3. #43
    Very Active Member pendaluft's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Bronx, NY
    Posts
    175

    Re: Dryland Training For Swimmers

    I was trying to do it with NO hands on the ground -- but the ball kept rolling, I only got about 2 - 5 seconds up there at most. Is this impossible, or just a good long range goal?

  4. #44
    Won Slowest Swimmer Award bzaks1424's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Libertyville, IL
    Posts
    675
    Blog Entries
    33

    Re: Dryland Training For Swimmers

    Quote Originally Posted by pendaluft View Post
    I was trying to do it with NO hands on the ground -- but the ball kept rolling, I only got about 2 - 5 seconds up there at most. Is this impossible, or just a good long range goal?
    If you can dream it, you can do it.
    "Fran operated under the assumption that one’s ability to cope with the travails of daily life fluctuates in direct proportion to one’s willingness to work through hurt." -Ian Prichard

  5. #45
    Participating Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    13

    Re: Dryland Training For Swimmers

    Does rope-climbing carry over to swimming?

  6. #46
    Very Active Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    300

    Re: Dryland Training For Swimmers

    Here's a great book for bodyweight exercises including sample training programs.
    The author Ross Enamait is a former boxer and now a coach:
    http://www.rosstraining.com/nevergymless.html

  7. #47
    Very Active Member guppy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    137

    Re: Dryland Training For Swimmers

    Quote Originally Posted by bzaks1424 View Post
    If you can dream it, you can do it.
    "Don't dream it; be it!" --Richard O'Brien, the Rocky Horror Show

  8. #48
    Active Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Boca Raton
    Posts
    69

    Re: Dryland Training For Swimmers

    I believe rope climbing is one of the most effective dryland exercises. It involves the same muscles that we "pull" with in swimming and involves rotation during each pull when one hand crosses over the other as you climb the rope. One of the most important aspects of this exercise is that the spine must remain secure and stable for someone to use their lats and climb up the rope - basically, the core work in this exercise is tremendous.

  9. #49
    sprint diva The Fortress's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    8,108
    Blog Entries
    2132

    Re: Dryland Training For Swimmers

    Quote Originally Posted by guppy View Post
    Of all the routines on the physioball I think this is one of the toughest, if not the toughest.
    Much harder if you're actually in a full superman streamline position.

    I wish there were a rope at my gym. I'd like that dryland.

  10. #50
    Active Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Boca Raton
    Posts
    69

    Re: Dryland Training For Swimmers

    This is what we have been doing the past month to improve our power endurance in the legs. Pushing a truck or SUV is simple and is very effective in increasing power and the ability to deal with igh levels of lactic acid in the muscle. Check out the video clip below.

    [nomedia="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L559KJX8oU4"]YouTube - Drlyand Training for Swimmers - Pushing the Navigator[/nomedia]

  11. #51
    Active Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Homer Glen Illinois
    Posts
    34

    Re: Dryland Training For Swimmers

    I work with weights 3 days a week. I usually do a push/pull type circuit with sit ups and a squat/jumps set in between.

    30+ pushups
    15+ ez curls
    situps/leg raises/other ab exercise
    20+ dips
    15+ lat pulldowns
    squats/jump sets

    I tend to do lower weight/higher reps since it seems to be easier on my shoulders. I go through this circuit 4-6 times with little rest. Sometimes I split the set with a 20-30min run on the treadmill. Whole thing with the run takes about an hour.

  12. #52
    Very Active Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    821
    Blog Entries
    167

    Re: Dryland Training For Swimmers

    Quote Originally Posted by Waterdog7946 View Post
    I work with weights 3 days a week. I usually do a push/pull type circuit with sit ups and a squat/jumps set in between.

    30+ pushups
    15+ ez curls
    situps/leg raises/other ab exercise
    20+ dips
    15+ lat pulldowns
    squats/jump sets

    I tend to do lower weight/higher reps since it seems to be easier on my shoulders. I go through this circuit 4-6 times with little rest. Sometimes I split the set with a 20-30min run on the treadmill. Whole thing with the run takes about an hour.
    This is amazingly close to my routine. How long have you been using it? Has it had a demonstrable effect on your swimming?

  13. #53
    Active Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Homer Glen Illinois
    Posts
    34

    Re: Dryland Training For Swimmers

    I've been doing this routine for about 2 months now..in the begining I could only do 2 sets of each with only 20 pushups each set....as far as how its affecting my swimming..IDK I haven't been timed since nationals but I definatly feel stronger in practice. I've held some really good 10x50 sprint sets during practice over the last two weeks and from the jump squats I feel a bit more oooooomph coming off walls.

  14. #54
    Very Active Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    821
    Blog Entries
    167

    Re: Dryland Training For Swimmers

    Some time ago I posted this question:
    Suppose I do 3 different exercises (e.g. planks, curls, squats). What are the relative merits of doing them in a cycle (planks, curls, squats, planks, curls, squats...) versus doing them serially, (planks, planks, planks, curls, curls, curls, squats, squats, squats...)?
    Grif replied:
    Its not exactly the pattern you do - its the rest between sets. For example of I do 3 sets of planks for 1 minute and take 30 seconds rest in between it would be beneficial to do some pull ups during the rest period. Reall, its the difference of doin another exercise during your rest time between planks instead of just sitting there.
    So now I am thinking about how this relates to swimming sets. Consider this 1600 yd set:

    8x(100 AFAP + 100 active recovery)/4:00 - do 4 of them freestyle and 4 backstroke.

    I have found that I can swim faster times and hurt less if I alternate fr, bk, fr, bk... than if I do the first 4 one stroke and the second 4 the other stroke. Is there any good reason to believe that is better to alternate strokes, or swim them in groups? I tend to think that since the goal is to train to swim fast, it is better to do them in whatevery way yields teh fastest swims. On the other hand, sometimes I think it is mentally easier to get one group over with, then tackle the next group... maybe the difference is insignificant and it would be more beneficial to just go do some drylands than sit at the computer terminal and split hairs over minutia...

  15. #55
    Active Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Boca Raton
    Posts
    69

    Re: Dryland Training For Swimmers

    Quote Originally Posted by Karl_S View Post
    Some time ago I posted this question:


    Grif replied:


    So now I am thinking about how this relates to swimming sets. Consider this 1600 yd set:

    8x(100 AFAP + 100 active recovery)/4:00 - do 4 of them freestyle and 4 backstroke.

    I have found that I can swim faster times and hurt less if I alternate fr, bk, fr, bk... than if I do the first 4 one stroke and the second 4 the other stroke. Is there any good reason to believe that is better to alternate strokes, or swim them in groups? I tend to think that since the goal is to train to swim fast, it is better to do them in whatevery way yields teh fastest swims. On the other hand, sometimes I think it is mentally easier to get one group over with, then tackle the next group... maybe the difference is insignificant and it would be more beneficial to just go do some drylands than sit at the computer terminal and split hairs over minutia...
    During our strength circuit we might alternate a squat with a plank. The plank will not cause you to fatigue during the squat since the are working different muscles in different ways. If I want to cause more fatigue I can do all the squats in a row and then do all the planks in a row. I believe this concept can be applied to swimming.

  16. #56
    Very Active Member orca1946's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    schaumburg, il - U S A
    Posts
    7,855

    Re: Dryland Training For Swimmers

    I would think less squats for swimming & more arms.

  17. #57
    Active Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Boca Raton
    Posts
    69

    Re: Dryland Training For Swimmers

    Quote Originally Posted by orca1946 View Post
    I would think less squats for swimming & more arms.
    I was just using these exercises as an example to make my point. As far as the debate between lower and upper body exercises goes, there is no reason not to do both (aside from injury or limitations). Lower body should be emphasized more in breaststrokers than others. However, lower body strength and power exercises are going to translate into more power in the start and the turn for any swimmer.

  18. #58
    Won Slowest Swimmer Award bzaks1424's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Libertyville, IL
    Posts
    675
    Blog Entries
    33

    Re: Dryland Training For Swimmers

    Quote Originally Posted by Grif View Post
    I was just using these exercises as an example to make my point. As far as the debate between lower and upper body exercises goes, there is no reason not to do both (aside from injury or limitations). Lower body should be emphasized more in breaststrokers than others. However, lower body strength and power exercises are going to translate into more power in the start and the turn for any swimmer.
    Not to mention a properly performed squat will work a huge chunk of the body.
    "Fran operated under the assumption that one’s ability to cope with the travails of daily life fluctuates in direct proportion to one’s willingness to work through hurt." -Ian Prichard

  19. #59
    Very Active Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    821
    Blog Entries
    167

    Re: Dryland Training For Swimmers

    Quote Originally Posted by Grif View Post
    During our strength circuit we might alternate a squat with a plank. The plank will not cause you to fatigue during the squat since the are working different muscles in different ways. If I want to cause more fatigue I can do all the squats in a row and then do all the planks in a row. I believe this concept can be applied to swimming.
    This is exactly what I am trying to understand. What are the relative merits of causing more fatigue, versus alternating exercises so that you do each one with less fatiigue?

  20. #60
    Won Slowest Swimmer Award bzaks1424's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Libertyville, IL
    Posts
    675
    Blog Entries
    33

    Re: Dryland Training For Swimmers

    Quote Originally Posted by Karl_S View Post
    This is exactly what I am trying to understand. What are the relative merits of causing more fatigue, versus alternating exercises so that you do each one with less fatiigue?
    When you're trying to cause more fatigue - and seeing what your body can handle - you're training more so for endurance (less rest between sets).
    When you're alternating - you're training more so for strength and or power (depending on your interval - more rest)
    "Fran operated under the assumption that one’s ability to cope with the travails of daily life fluctuates in direct proportion to one’s willingness to work through hurt." -Ian Prichard

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •