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Thread: Is swimming very high volume the only way to get better?

  1. #1
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    Is swimming very high volume the only way to get better?

    Hello, swimmers! I'm barely a real swimmer... I come from a running background (middle distance, mostly, and a bunch of post-college 5ks) and a series of injuries forced me into the pool. I actually couldn't swim at all until 2013, but seemed to improve fairly quickly (at freestyle).

    So here's my question. Can I keep improving without doing super-long swims?

    I do not seem to recover or cope well with long swims. I've gone up to 3500 yards in a single workout (took almost an hour), but it basically wipes me out and I don't think I'm good enough at form to keep good form for the whole swim. But when I reduce my workout volume to 1800-2800 yards per workout (but lots of hard sets that a great triathlon coach writes for me) and swim 6 times per week, I do improve! I've brought my 100 yard time from 1:31 down to 1:21 in the past few months and my 500 from 8:00ish, to 7:28. I already have good muscle strength and aerobic fitness from all the lifting and training I did for running so I think mostly it's my form that holds me back in the swim.

    So should I keep swimming shorter swims and wait for form to smooth out? Or should I push the distance (maybe even just once a week?). Will I EVER feel good going long?

    One of the issues I have is that my health isn't great [which is the reason for my running injuries; stress fractures]. I have an eating disorder history and tend to underfuel and that may be an issue too, though I'm doing much better now and am at a very healthy weight. I feel like my body is kind of exhausted, and while I like swimming, I want to get better at it without overexercising.

    Also, how do I do a darn flip turn?? I feel like my times would drop if I could do one, but as is, I'm so clumsy at it that they slow me down.

    Thanks, everyone. I hope to make swimming 'my' sport, even though I only began in my 20s and would love some input.

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    Very Active Member waves101's Avatar
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    Re: Is swimming very high volume the only way to get better?

    Yes, you can certainly improve without mega yardage. In fact, there's a big movement to do higher quality and shorter yardage workouts. I suggest you go with what feels comfortable now. During those workouts focus on smoothing out your stroke and trying to maximize your distance per stroke. As you become more efficient the workouts will get easier. Plus, you need to be in it for the long haul so you need to make sure you enjoy it.

    Flip turns... use your hands to throw the water over your head. Most new swimmers make big round loops out to the side to get flipped over. Make sure you are not doing it. The hands need to catch the water and throw it over your head. This helps get the hips over. Try it away from the wall first and then move into the wall when you get comfortable. Good Luck.

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    Very Active Member Allen Stark's Avatar
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    Re: Is swimming very high volume the only way to get better?

    What are your goals.If you want to swim longer open water or postal swims(5-10K) you are probably going to benefit from longer swims.If you are aiming for shorter races then long swims can be counterproductive. Also,in swimming,technique trumps conditioning every time.If you can find a Masters program with a coach you like,that would be ideal.Next best would be get with someone knowledgeable to help look at your stroke and turns.5 min with someone who knows what they are doing will help your flip more than any descriptions.You can also post a video and let us make suggestions.One of our forumites,swimspire,has a website for helping people with technique(for a fee,of course.)http://www.swimspire.com
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    Very Active Member Swimspire's Avatar
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    Re: Is swimming very high volume the only way to get better?

    I absolutely agree with Allen (an authority on this forum and a highly accomplished swimmer as well!). Swimming is often considered to be a sport that is injury-free and low-impact, but you simply have to take a look at the many threads on this forum about shoulder injuries to know that this is not necessarily true! Runnerskick, there are unfortunately no short cuts when it comes to improving your swimming. Your form usually doesn't just "smooth out" on its own and if you develop bad habits now, they will be very difficult to break as you progress. As a new swimmer, this is the time to build your technical foundation and at this point, technique should be as important as conditioning for you (indeed, many drills function as conditioning exercises in addition to helping improving your stroke!). Also, as I mentioned on a previous thread, you need to go into this with patience and without rushing things so that you avoid injuries and also keep a broader perspective on your progress.


    For the flip turns, here is a good video sequence you can try. From the first video, you can link to the next three clips in the sequence. Be sure to do these in the deep end of the pool!





    Hope this helps! Good luck!

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    Very Active Member swimr4life's Avatar
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    Re: Is swimming very high volume the only way to get better?

    Technique is important too. I would recommend getting a coach or instructor to watch your stroke and see if there are things you could change to be more efficient. It would be a good investment!
    My goal is to die young as late as possible!

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    Very Active Member Swimosaur's Avatar
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    Re: Is swimming very high volume the only way to get better?

    Quote Originally Posted by runnerskick View Post
    Can I keep improving without doing super-long swims?
    Yes. Consistent with the advice above, that form rules in swimming, I'll suggest exactly the opposite: The better path to improvement is to do super-short swims!

    Specifically, swim one length at a time, and count the number of strokes it takes to finish the length. Stroke count is a rough, first-approximation proxy for efficiency. Try to feel as smooth as possible as you're moving through the water. If your body position is better, and you're encountering less resistance, it will take less effort (fewer strokes) to go a certain distance. Rest a few seconds at the end of the length, and do it again. The point is not to make yourself tired. Exactly the opposite. The point is to avoid water resistance, and finish the length with less effort.

    When I'm working on form (particularly in breaststroke, though that's a long story), I always count the number strokes per length (at a certain speed, or level of effort). When it's only about form, when form is the main focus, I never swim more than 50 yards at a time.

    Good luck!

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    Re: Is swimming very high volume the only way to get better?

    Wow, thank you all so much for that valuable and thoughtful input. It's good to hear that lower volume is possible, when so many swimmers I know talk about doing 6,000 or 7,000 yards at a pop. I never plan to swim massive distance events, so that's all right. I just want to improve my movement patterns.

    I do have the opportunity to work with an in-person swim coach and have done so a couple of times. So far, I've improved # of breaths per lap and figured out bilateral breathing, but my stroke count is still too high (I have been able to take as few as 18 strokes per 25 yards, but as soon as I start going fast, I'm back to 20+, essentially muscling my way through the water). Most of you seem to agree that stroke count is a big deal, so that will be my next focus. I'm doing several drills for that, including catch-up, finger drag, zipper drill, and single-arm drills. Maybe more work will the pull buoy is in order as well.

    I'll work on this and schedule another lesson with the in-person coach. Thanks, everyon0e, your input is so appreciated.

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    Re: Is swimming very high volume the only way to get better?

    hello,

    your title asked,
    "Is swimming very high volume the only way to get better?"
    NO, there are many ways to get better.


    you said you're "barely a real swimmer & come from a middle distance running background then injuries forced you into the pool. You couldn't swim at all until 2013, but seemed to improve fairly quickly (at freestyle).

    your question: "Can I keep improving without doing super-long swims?"
    YES you can

    you do not seem to recover or cope well with long swims you've done up to 3500 yards in a single workout (took almost an hour), but it basically wipes you out and
    you wrote "I don't think I'm good enough at form to keep good form for the whole swim."
    But when I reduce my workout volume to 1800 - 2800 yards per workout
    (but lots of hard sets that a great triathlon coach writes for me)
    you swim 6 times per week
    You've improved,
    your 100 yard time started at
    1:31 and now you can go 1:21
    your 500 from 8:00ish, to 7:28.

    You already have good muscle strength and aerobic fitness from all the lifting and training you did when you ran
    you wrote: "I think mostly it's my form that holds me back in the swim."

    So should you
    1) keep swimming shorter swims and wait for form to smooth out? Or
    2) push the distance (maybe even just once a week?).

    Will I EVER feel good going long?
    ~~~> Maybe

    Health issues:
    1) stress fractures from running & an
    2) eating disorder history and tend to underfuel and that may be an issue too, though you're doing much better now and are at a very healthy weight.
    3) feel exhausted, don't want to over exercise

    You asked:
    "how do I do a darn flip turn?"
    You feel like your times would drop if you could do flip turns.

    You kind of answered your own questions.
    I assume you're female?
    What is your age, sex, height & weight?
    What are you training for?
    you mentioned a coach, Are you training with a team or with his workouts on your own?

    You will continue dropping your 100 time by improving your technique and your swim conditioning!
    You must learn how to do flip turns.
    The best ways to improve improve your technique are

    1) one on one swimming technique training, along with

    2) Videos: you need to see what you look like when you're swimming
    how you push off & streamline, (you can make huge improvements by just perfecting these 2 things )
    how you kick (BTW runners tend to over kick)
    how your move your arms (improve your distance per stroke
    how you breathe
    How you turn
    you need before and after videos

    BTW what you're doing underwater is way more important than what you do above the water.

    It also helps to watch videos of the best in the world and copy their technique.

    3) When you complete your one on one technique improvement training the next and greatest challenge is getting these new improvements to STICK.
    The way you do this is you focus on 1, 2, or a few replacement habits.
    You can't correct technique by thinking about what not to do. You can only correct it by concentrating on the new correct motion and actually doing it over and over and over until it becomes your new habit.
    NOW here's the challenge,
    the moment you quit concentrating and doing your new habit you'll immediately start doing the motion the way you've always done it.

    It's impossible to tell you what you need to correct without seeing you swim.
    The best feedback would be at the pool, learning one thing at a time.
    2nd best is make videos of you swimming, youtube em and provide us with the links and ask for suggestions.

    How long does it take to create a new habit and make it stick?
    It takes what it takes.

    Next, you must improve your swim conditioning
    Swimming long distances with open turns and funky form won't get you where you want to go. If you really want to improve, you must swim faster in practice, you must swim faster times on faster intervals, while you are slowly increasing your yardage. YOu will get used to more yardage and not be as exhausted.

    Lastly mix it up, work on everything, sprints, longer sprints, middle distance and longer swims.

    You can swim faster faster,

    Ande
    Last edited by ande; March 25th, 2015 at 12:43 PM.

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    Very Active Member orca1946's Avatar
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    Re: Is swimming very high volume the only way to get better?

    YEAH --- what Ande said !!!!!!!

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    Very Active Member Gary P's Avatar
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    Re: Is swimming very high volume the only way to get better?

    Quote Originally Posted by runnerskick View Post
    I have been able to take as few as 18 strokes per 25 yards, but as soon as I start going fast, I'm back to 20+, essentially muscling my way through the water.
    That honestly doesn't sound too bad, especially for someone who only took up swimming in the last couple years. I can do a length of a 25 yard pool in as little as 14 strokes (counting the break-out pull) at a ~1:20/100 pace, but at 500 free "race pace" (1:10/hundred) I start at around 18 and get up to 20 or 21 when fatigued.

    FWIW, I took up swimming last year after a 27 year layoff. I had pretty much zero endurance at the beginning. Not only had I not swam for 27 years, I hadn't really worked out for most of that time either. But I did have a reasonable "feel for the water" from all the mileage I swam as a kid/teen so I didn't have the same kind of technique learning curve a newcomer would.

    My training has pretty much been only sets of 25's, 50's, and 75's with short rests (USRPT), and my total workouts are typically only 2200-3500 yards. After 6 months of that, 3-5 times a week, I tried a 1.2 mile swim* for time and was able to hold a ~1:20/100 pace to the half way point and then ~1:18/100 on the back half. So I would say no, you don't have to do mega yardage to improve your endurance.

    Technique and stroke efficiency matter, but you need conditioning to be able to hold the technique/efficiency together when you fatigue. You can get just as much conditioning, and arguably more, doing short distances at high pace as you can at longer distances but slower pace. If you can do a length in 18 strokes, your technique can't be all that bad. How's your streamline off the wall? When I'm doing a length in 14 strokes, I'm past the flags before I take that first stroke. I'm guessing you probably don't make it that far. That would make your 18 closer to my 14 than the difference might suggest. You always want to be mindful of your technique, but I think you may be ready for more high intensity work within the time/yardage you're already committing to.

    *This was an in-pool time trial to give myself a baseline time for an upcoming 1.2 mile open water event.
    Last edited by Gary P; March 31st, 2015 at 03:41 PM.

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    Re: Is swimming very high volume the only way to get better?

    I’ve been pondering the same sort of question. So…the general consensus is that one would see more improvement by swimming more frequently with lower yardage than from fewer higher yardage workouts? For example...same weekly yardage but in 4-5 workouts per week instead of just 2 or 3 workouts per week. (Presuming that technique and such is good)

    Dan

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    Re: Is swimming very high volume the only way to get better?

    A high volume of drills works for me (as a swimmer who learned to swim correctly in my 40's)

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    Re: Is swimming very high volume the only way to get better?

    For me, in my current state, long and slow yardage is the way to go. It's not the "only" way, but here's why I'm taking that route:

    My speed for about eight strokes of fly has been pretty consistent over the last decade. What’s different today, as opposed to a few years ago, is that I’m out of shape: When I swam a full 50 yards of fly a month ago, in my first meet in a long time, I died like a pig.

    Thus, I feel the need for more yards at a low intensity – maybe even for so-called junk yardage.

    To be sure, other training approaches might be better suited for other individuals who face different circumstances.

    Consider, for example, Glenn Gruber, who ranked first in two events in the FINA world rankings (and 3rd in another event). He’s shown the value of Uniquely Short Race-Paced Training (USRP). Today, he’s logging fewer yards than in the past – with workouts that last less than an hour – even as he’s held his times essentially constant while advancing from the 50-54 to the 65-69 age groups, a period when most master’s men slow down significantly or just give up swimming altogether. It seems pretty clear that, if you are really in great shape, as Glenn has been for decades, and if you are in your 60s and can swim a 200 free within 10 seconds of your college times, then you should think about doing what Glenn is doing - and you really shouldn't do what I'm doing.

    But my situation is different from Glenn’s, as is the situation of the original poster: a few years ago, Glenn pounded down about 4,500 yards in an hour-long postal swim; I on the other hand, don’t really have what it takes to swim 3,000 yards in an hour. In other words, unlike Glenn, I’m trying to get back in shape. (When I’m back in shape, by the way, I’ll join those who are experimenting with USRP, and I’ll certainly go back to my old ways of occasional high-intensity sets – but that might be a year away, still).

    In going for junk yardage, I’m finding support in this bit of apparently “settled science” (full study: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24812628 ... Also see: http://www.swimmingscience.net/2015/...e-part-ii.html ):

    “…a period of reduced volume and higher intensity can enhance sprint performance after a high volume base period. Likewise it can sustain fitness for middle distance events after a lower intensity/higher volume base period.”
    I especially noted this phrase: “… after a high volume base period.” That seemed consistent with words I found in “Swimming Past 50,” Mel Goldstein and Dave Tanner:

    “Interval training permits only incomplete recovery between repeats, whereas goal set training allows near-complete recovery. For example, a set of 5 x 100 with 30 seconds rest between each 100 is interval training, but the same set (done with a dive) with five minutes rest between repeats is goal set training … Because this type of training is very stressful and can result in fatigue that lasts for days, the past-50 swimmer should use it sparingly. A goal set once every two weeks during the high-intensity phase of the season is a reasonable guideline.”
    The original poster noted fatigue, by the way:
    Quote Originally Posted by runnerskick View Post
    ... One of the issues I have is that my health isn't great [which is the reason for my running injuries; stress fractures]... I feel like my body is kind of exhausted, and while I like swimming, I want to get better at it without overexercising.
    All of this points to a defense of Standard Issue Training(SIT), with high-volume and relatively low-intensity swims (with a lot ofkicking and some over-distance), with an occasional blast of a race-paced swim – at least until I’m inreasonably good physical shape ...

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    Very Active Member Gary P's Avatar
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    Re: Is swimming very high volume the only way to get better?

    Quote Originally Posted by james lucas View Post
    But my situation is different from Glenn’s, as is the situation of the original poster: a few years ago, Glenn pounded down about 4,500 yards in an hour-long postal swim; I on the other hand, don’t really have what it takes to swim 3,000 yards in an hour. In other words, unlike Glenn, I’m trying to get back in shape. (When I’m back in shape, by the way, I’ll join those who are experimenting with USRP, and I’ll certainly go back to my old ways of occasional high-intensity sets – but that might be a year away, still).
    Last spring I was completely out of shape. I hadn't swam in 27 years and hadn't really worked out in about 24. I was also 75 lbs over my high school graduation weight. I changed my diet, started biking 5-10 miles 3-4 times a week. I dropped about 25 lbs in the first 2 months. In the summer, I started going to the Tuesday/Thursday morning open lap swims' at the local outdoor pool. It's a short season, I maybe got 12 - 14 unorganized workouts in by Labor day when the pool closed. Down another ~15 lbs, I started swimming at the YMCA in September, 2-3 times a week. After 3 weeks of hodgepodge workouts, I stumbled across USRPT on the internet. It seemed like the most efficient way to get up to competitive speed, so I fully committed to USRPT at that time. At first I was going 3 times a week, then 4, now 5-6. Most workouts are less than a hour, and range from 1500-3500 yards; most commonly in the 2200-2500 range.

    In early October, I swam my first masters meet and did a 2:47 200 meter (short course) freestyle. That converts to about a 2:30 in yards, or 40 seconds slower than my lifetime best swam 28 years ago. Less than 5 months later, I swam a 2:08 200Y free in a meet. A few days later, I did a 1.2 mile (2100 yard) time trial at 27:40. I've lost 20 more pounds since I started USPRT, for a total of 60. Less than a year after I started, I'm only 15 lbs over my graduation weight, and about the same weight at 46 as I was as a 20-year-old soldier. The improvements at this point are coming in smaller bits, but I'm still improving. I expect to be able to swim within 10 seconds of my LTB 200 free time by summer's end.

    The moral of the story? USRPT isn't just for people who are already in good swimming shape. It can be a great way to get back into shape, assuming you have a latent "feel for the water" from previous swimming experience. I went into it with a very, very minimal base. Like 30,000 yards worth. I'm not saying you should switch. I'm just telling you that it worked great for this out-of-shape slug. Sure, I would have seen improvements with a SIT program as well. I wholeheartedly believe they would not have been nearly as dramatic, however. And I wouldn't have been able to do it, anyway, because I really wouldn't have had the time.
    Last edited by Gary P; April 1st, 2015 at 08:21 PM.

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    Re: Is swimming very high volume the only way to get better?

    Gary -- your story is amazing! Good on ya!

    I've been using USRPT type sets as well, and they work. I get just as tired after an hour as I do with "normal" workouts, and I don't think my average heart rate over the hour is lower. I'm also sore after USRPT workouts because I go to failure, like lifting. But the more time you spend at full speed, the more time you have to learn how to go fast. That is an important aspect.

    I've also been coaching a group of 8-12 year olds, despite my daughter moving up to a more advanced group. I started sending out videos from youTube and from other places showing the drills we were going to do that week. Those that watch the videos have made noticeable improvements and at very least most of the kids know how to do the drill. There are a lot of basic videos of Olympic athletes swimming which are valuable to watch, especially the slow motion or underwater ones. You might not be able to swim like Matt Grevers, but you can probably pick up one or two of the good things he does and incorporate those aspects into your practice.

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    Re: Is swimming very high volume the only way to get better?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary P View Post
    That honestly doesn't sound too bad, especially for someone who only took up swimming in the last couple years. I can do a length of a 25 yard pool in as little as 14 strokes (counting the break-out pull) at a ~1:20/100 pace, but at 500 free "race pace" (1:10/hundred) I start at around 18 and get up to 20 or 21 when fatigued.

    FWIW, I took up swimming last year after a 27 year layoff. I had pretty much zero endurance at the beginning. Not only had I not swam for 27 years, I hadn't really worked out for most of that time either. But I did have a reasonable "feel for the water" from all the mileage I swam as a kid/teen so I didn't have the same kind of technique learning curve a newcomer would.

    My training has pretty much been only sets of 25's, 50's, and 75's with short rests (USRPT), and my total workouts are typically only 2200-3500 yards. After 6 months of that, 3-5 times a week, I tried a 1.2 mile swim* for time and was able to hold a ~1:20/100 pace to the half way point and then ~1:18/100 on the back half. So I would say no, you don't have to do mega yardage to improve your endurance.

    Technique and stroke efficiency matter, but you need conditioning to be able to hold the technique/efficiency together when you fatigue. You can get just as much conditioning, and arguably more, doing short distances at high pace as you can at longer distances but slower pace. If you can do a length in 18 strokes, your technique can't be all that bad. How's your streamline off the wall? When I'm doing a length in 14 strokes, I'm past the flags before I take that first stroke. I'm guessing you probably don't make it that far. That would make your 18 closer to my 14 than the difference might suggest. You always want to be mindful of your technique, but I think you may be ready for more high intensity work within the time/yardage you're already committing to.

    *This was an in-pool time trial to give myself a baseline time for an upcoming 1.2 mile open water event.


    That's very enlightening!

    I've actually been doing just that since I came here: similar volume (about 2000-2500 yards per workout six times a week) but higher intensity/less rest, with a bunch of short intervals on a miniscule amount of rest. Times have dropped several seconds in just a few weeks, and so has stroke count with some drills. Now I can do 15 strokes to a lap at easy pace (1:35/100 yards) and 18 when in the 1:20s. My new 400 yard time is 5:48 and I swam 1500 straight in 22:57 on Monday. I think I can better that, and I'm hitting consistently under 1:25 per 100 for many short intervals with short <:15 second rests. I can also swim 25 yards in 14 seconds now, which is new. IDK what that translates to, but it appears that my form is good enough for that distance, at least.

    Oh, and yeah, my streamline off the wall is nonexistent, I take a stroke pretty much right away.

    What I have been doing is a bunch of boxing and rowing and general calisthenics in addition to swimming, as my health has improved and my stress fracture has healed. Pretty sure that's contributed.

    by the way, I should note that as a middle distance runner, almost all improvement I saw was from high intensity/low rest. Long slow distance did little but break me down.
    Last edited by runnerskick; April 27th, 2015 at 01:14 PM.

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    Re: Is swimming very high volume the only way to get better?

    Quote Originally Posted by james lucas View Post
    For me, in my current state, long and slow yardage is the way to go. It's not the "only" way, but here's why I'm taking that route:

    My speed for about eight strokes of fly has been pretty consistent over the last decade. What’s different today, as opposed to a few years ago, is that I’m out of shape: When I swam a full 50 yards of fly a month ago, in my first meet in a long time, I died like a pig.

    Thus, I feel the need for more yards at a low intensity – maybe even for so-called junk yardage.

    To be sure, other training approaches might be better suited for other individuals who face different circumstances.

    Consider, for example, Glenn Gruber, who ranked first in two events in the FINA world rankings (and 3rd in another event). He’s shown the value of Uniquely Short Race-Paced Training (USRP). Today, he’s logging fewer yards than in the past – with workouts that last less than an hour – even as he’s held his times essentially constant while advancing from the 50-54 to the 65-69 age groups, a period when most master’s men slow down significantly or just give up swimming altogether. It seems pretty clear that, if you are really in great shape, as Glenn has been for decades, and if you are in your 60s and can swim a 200 free within 10 seconds of your college times, then you should think about doing what Glenn is doing - and you really shouldn't do what I'm doing.

    But my situation is different from Glenn’s, as is the situation of the original poster: a few years ago, Glenn pounded down about 4,500 yards in an hour-long postal swim; I on the other hand, don’t really have what it takes to swim 3,000 yards in an hour. In other words, unlike Glenn, I’m trying to get back in shape. (When I’m back in shape, by the way, I’ll join those who are experimenting with USRP, and I’ll certainly go back to my old ways of occasional high-intensity sets – but that might be a year away, still).

    In going for junk yardage, I’m finding support in this bit of apparently “settled science” (full study: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24812628 ... Also see: http://www.swimmingscience.net/2015/...e-part-ii.html ):



    I especially noted this phrase: “… after a high volume base period.” That seemed consistent with words I found in “Swimming Past 50,” Mel Goldstein and Dave Tanner:


    The original poster noted fatigue, by the way:

    All of this points to a defense of Standard Issue Training(SIT), with high-volume and relatively low-intensity swims (with a lot ofkicking and some over-distance), with an occasional blast of a race-paced swim – at least until I’m inreasonably good physical shape ...
    Thanks. I'm so glad someone said this. Personally, I think it is best to incorporate some of both types of training, but when I was most out of shape, I too worked on improving my endurance by focusing on distance. Not long, lazy swims, but increasing distances and reducing time, and making sure I got enough rest after swimming long distances. I lost 60 lbs in 3 months, but also greatly increased my endurance at the same time and increased the weights I was using in strength-training. I went from being able to swim three laps to swimming 3 miles continuous in three months. The first three times I swam 3 miles, I needed a week to recover, but within two months time, I was able to swim 3 miles 3 times per week. I did not neglect intensity. During one month, I improved my 1-mile time by 10 minutes, from 40 minutes to 30 minutes. Now that I'm able to do the 3-mile distance comfortably and continue to focus on improving times, I will be incorporating more interval training by practicing with the local swim team. Different things work differently for different people. I used to be a long-distance runner and love the endorphins and aerobic loop so I gravitated toward this type of swimming when major foot surgery ended my running. But I also knew the importance of interval training and always planned on incorporating this as well. Coaches are obviously very important, and I too would like to get one soon.

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