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Thread: What not to do?

  1. #1
    Newbie koblun's Avatar
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    Hamilton, Ont.
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    What not to do?

    Hey guys—this is my first post on the site so cut me a little slack if I make any mistakes or if this has been asked a million times; I'm looking for some advice on what not to do once someone has been swimming on their own for awhile now.

    I started swimming laps at my local pool in August 2018—so still fairly new—consistently about four to five hours a week. I've noticed huge gains in my technique, speed, comfort, physique, and am feeling pretty good with how far I've come on my own. I'm not in one now—but I want to avoid falling into a slump so I'm asking if anyone has any ideas on how to make sure I'm constantly moving forward with my progress/staying motivated. Basically I'm trying to not plateau—I want to make sure that if things are getting easier, that I make them harder before I get stuck in a rut of bad habits.

    I have a basic fitness tracker that tracks my metres, time in pool, lengths and I think speed? I'm not sure what the last thing I mentioned on my tracker but whatever it is I average 3'14"/100m. What does that mean and does it matter?

    What kinds of numbers should I be paying attention to, what matters/what doesn't, and what are some things that would be good for a somewhat new/usually swims in the fast lane/can do a decent flip turn kind of swimmer to do at this stage of the game?

    If this helps—I usually swim freestyle and will do some breaststroke. As far as goals go—I just love the feeling of a nice long swim and love how it's making my body look and feel. I think next year I would look into a race of some sort and am going to attempt open water training with a buddy on a kayak.

  2. #2
    Very Active Member orca1946's Avatar
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    schaumburg, il - U S A
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    Re: What not to do?

    3 min. 14 seconds per 100 meters pace, I think. If you are just getting back in the pool, you seem to be making good progress. Keep at it.

  3. #3
    aka Elaine-iaK & Aqua Dog ElaineK's Avatar
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    Feb 2010
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    Georgia
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    Re: What not to do?

    Nice to have you join us, Koblun. I wrote an article for Swimspire that might be helpful for you:
    https://www.swimspire.com/staying-se...-solo-swimmer/

    Good luck!
    http://ElaineiaKsTravels.wordpress.com

    ~ Believing in your dreams can be far more rewarding than living by your limitations ~Karla Peterson

  4. #4
    Active Member airborne18th's Avatar
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    rehoboth beach, de
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    Re: What not to do?

    Quote Originally Posted by koblun View Post
    Hey guys—this is my first post on the site so cut me a little slack if I make any mistakes or if this has been asked a million times; I'm looking for some advice on what not to do once someone has been swimming on their own for awhile now.

    I started swimming laps at my local pool in August 2018—so still fairly new—consistently about four to five hours a week. I've noticed huge gains in my technique, speed, comfort, physique, and am feeling pretty good with how far I've come on my own. I'm not in one now—but I want to avoid falling into a slump so I'm asking if anyone has any ideas on how to make sure I'm constantly moving forward with my progress/staying motivated. Basically I'm trying to not plateau—I want to make sure that if things are getting easier, that I make them harder before I get stuck in a rut of bad habits.

    I have a basic fitness tracker that tracks my metres, time in pool, lengths and I think speed? I'm not sure what the last thing I mentioned on my tracker but whatever it is I average 3'14"/100m. What does that mean and does it matter?

    What kinds of numbers should I be paying attention to, what matters/what doesn't, and what are some things that would be good for a somewhat new/usually swims in the fast lane/can do a decent flip turn kind of swimmer to do at this stage of the game?

    If this helps—I usually swim freestyle and will do some breaststroke. As far as goals go—I just love the feeling of a nice long swim and love how it's making my body look and feel. I think next year I would look into a race of some sort and am going to attempt open water training with a buddy on a kayak.
    It really depends on your goal. Conditioning is about time and intensity... that is how you approach workouts and which adaptations you are trying to achieve. Manipulating the time and intensity are how you condition. Rest is also an important variable.. But if you are doing long slow distance,, then push the duration of swimming 10-15%... or go the other way and lower the duration and start pushing up the intensity..... now how to turn the duration and intensity into actual intervals is again about the adaptation and your level of conditioning.
    TSAC-F,Swim Speed Secrets - STGRID

  5. #5
    Active Member
    Join Date
    May 2018
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    54

    Re: What not to do?

    Quote Originally Posted by orca1946 View Post
    3 min. 14 seconds per 100 meters pace, I think. If you are just getting back in the pool, you seem to be making good progress. Keep at it.
    4 years ago I was the same situation with you, but the local triathlon club required 2'20" / 100 m to join (the majority of people inside were doing sub 1'55", some even as fast as 1'20"), as the result I couldn't get any proper coaching and wasted 4 years of my life.

  6. #6
    Very Active Member Swimspire's Avatar
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    Aug 2013
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    396

    Re: What not to do?

    You've definitely come to the right place for advice on how to keep motivated as a solo swimmer! ElaineK also started a Solo Swimmers thread which you might want to check out: http://forums.usms.org/showthread.ph...-Solo-Swimmers

    Beyond that, as a solo swimmer, knowledge is power - in other words, the more understanding you have about concepts related to stroke mechanics, the better you can create workouts that are continually challenging and allow you to improve in efficiency and speed. You might also want to consider getting your stroke technique analyzed, so that you have an idea as to your strengths and weaknesses and can design your workouts specifically around the areas that need improving.

    Good luck!
    Last edited by Swimspire; January 14th, 2019 at 11:37 AM.

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