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Thread: Ande's Swimming Tips: Swimming Faster Faster

  1. #721
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    Re: Ande's Swimming Tips: Swimming Faster Faster

    Tip 196 Backstroke Starts

    Backstroke starts can be tricky

    Here's a few key points:

    Enter the water when instructed by the officials and conserve energy

    grab then hand bar on the starting block
    I grip the starting block with my fingers but not my thumbs,
    I put my thumbs on the bar

    firmly plant your feet on the touch pad or side.
    I prefer shoulder width
    High up the touch pad as possible with out DQing or placing them on a slippery part of the pad.

    When the starter says take your mark.
    Pull up on the bar, lift your body out of the water while maintaining a solid connection with your feet (YOU DO NOT WANT TO SLIP)
    The more of your body that is out of the water,
    let less you'll have to push and lift when you start

    YOUR KNEES SHOULD BE BENT AROUND 90 DEGREES
    some swimmers when doing a backstroke start
    place their butts by their heels
    (THIS IS A MISTAKE)

    IF YOU WERE TRYING TO JUMP AS HIGH AND HARD AS YOU CAN
    you'd bend down a little bit then explode up
    too little, you don't get enough power
    too much, and you waste time
    find your just right point

    BEEP
    push against the bar with your arms, explode off the wall, jump UP and OUT backwards
    throw your arms out to the side and
    have your hands connect in streamline position while you're still in the air
    get your body up and out over the water
    get your entire body in the air

    swimmers lose power and energy when they drag their legs in the water off the start

    get your hands together and streamlined before you enter the water
    enter streamlined in one hole

    glide about a body length then start your SDK

    if your SDK is fast,
    take many, use most of the 15 meters
    have a kick count strategy, know how many kicks you need to take before you break out

    if your SDK isn't fast
    take a few or none, use your glide and starting speed then
    get up swimming

    Gauge your depth and distance, find what's just right for you
    Some swimmers have problems with being too shallow and
    other's might go too deep on their starts

    Practice and perfect your backstroke starts
    Improve your jumping ability

  2. #722
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    Re: Ande's Swimming Tips: Swimming Faster Faster

    Quote Originally Posted by ande View Post
    [B]If you're determined to swim back to back events.
    Call the meet director and ask if there will be breaks between your events
    Ask for breaks at the meet.

    One strategy is to enter your first event with a very slow time then enter your next event with a fast time, you might gain a few precious minutes to recover.

    You can enter both then choose to scratch one at the meet.
    I've seen meets with a very short break halfway, but I've never seen a meet director take otherwise unscheduled breaks during a meet.

    I have used your strategy periodically, especially when swimming a lot of events and relays at zones. A lot of people hate this allegedly pernicious strategy, commonly referred to as sandbagging. Nonetheless, a lot of people do it. I also tend to scratch one event per meet, although not my last couple meets.

    The older you are, the more recovery you need, I think. Back to back events are really hard for me, although I do do them.

  3. #723
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    Re: Ande's Swimming Tips: Swimming Faster Faster

    Tip 197 How Much to Warm Down

    It's important to warm down after each race,
    when you finish your race you should
    feel exhausted,
    have a racing heart,
    be burning with lactic acid, and
    gasping for breath.

    It's important to warm down until your body settles down from the shock of racing.

    Effort?
    Warm down swims are very easy. They should seem effortless.

    How far should you warm down?
    Keep moving till you feel
    lactic acid wash away, and
    your breathing and heart rate settle down.

    A good rule of thumb for 100's and 200's is to
    warm down at least twice the distance you raced.

    you don't need to swim that far for 400's and up

    sometimes you can't warm down as much as you need to
    because you'll miss your next event
    follow the heats, warm down as much as you can then
    show up to race your next event.

    Your mental attitude has a lot to do with how well you handle stress and fatigue. What ever you say and believe is true.

    In training, It's good to do hard swims with not enough time to recover.

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    Re: Ande's Swimming Tips: Swimming Faster Faster

    Stronger Sprinters tend to be Faster Sprinters

    Alain Bernard just broke the WR in the 100 LCM free in 47.60
    you can see the footage at
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nSXlbiY37XU
    in the first part he's standing behind the block
    after he breaks the record he sits on the lane rope
    He looks like a very strong guy.

    Take a look at any sprinter male or female, they are likely to have got some serious muscle.

    How do you get muscle if you don't have it?
    weight training and exercises

    Swimming doesn't provide enough resistance to gain the kind of strength sprinters need to power their way through the water.

    Gaining strength is difficult and slow, there's no quick fixes.

    Swimmers expecially need to strengthen the muscles that propel swimmers through the water.
    Lats, triceps, quads, and core muscles

    Sprinters need strength and speed.

    Perfect times to gain strength are
    1) during the off season when swimming is easy,
    2) during taper just before a meet, I'm an advocate of lifting closer to meets.

    When sprinters do traditional training, they reach a point in their season when it's nearly impossible to continue gaining strength,
    coaches might want to rethink this and design training to allow sprinters to continue gaining strength THE ENTIRE season.

    Stronger swimmers swim faster faster.

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    Re: Ande's Swimming Tips: Swimming Faster Faster

    Tip 198 Do 2 More Weight Work Outs a Month

    Most weight lifting programs
    lift 3 times a week
    At UT we lifted
    Tuesday, Thursday, & Sunday
    off days allow recovery

    If you lift every other day, (in the below pattern)
    you'll pick up one extra weight workout every 2 weeks
    which doesn't seem like much but
    if you did this for a year that would be
    26 extra weight training sessions
    which might give you an advantage over someone doing less.

    M L
    T
    W L
    T
    F L
    S
    S L
    M
    T L
    W
    T L
    F
    S L
    S

    If swimmers lighten up their swimming training they could continue to get stronger through out the season instead of getting stronger in the off season then peaking and back sliding on strength when swimming training increases mid season.

    Is strength and speed more important than aerobic conditioning for sprinters?

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    sprint diva The Fortress's Avatar
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    Re: Ande's Swimming Tips: Swimming Faster Faster

    Quote Originally Posted by ande View Post
    Tip 196 Backstroke Starts

    BEEP
    push against the bar with your arms, explode off the wall, jump UP and OUT backwards
    throw your arms out to the side and
    have your hands connect in streamline position while you're still in the air
    get your body up and out over the water
    get your entire body in the air
    I noticed in the latest issue of Splash magazine that it recommended throwing the arms straight back rather then sweeping them to the side. It's apparently faster. Seems like it would help you get deeper too. I've also had an assistant college coach tell me I should be doing this. Haven't experimented much with it yet though.

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    Re: Ande's Swimming Tips: Swimming Faster Faster

    Eddie recommends throwing arms to the side, I think it has a more neutral effect on the body than throwing them straight back which causes some rotation which could cause the swimmer to go deeper off the start.

    Either way the swimmer has plenty of time to get her hands and arms locked in streamline.

    More important issues are

    1) reacting fast to the beep,

    2) pushing off the wall hard without slipping,

    3) clearing the body over the water off the start and
    not dragging lower portions through the water,
    which slows the swimmer down. and

    4) entering in one hole, rather than having various portions of the body smack the water at once.

    Quote Originally Posted by The Fortress View Post
    I noticed in the latest issue of Splash magazine that it recommended throwing the arms straight back rather then sweeping them to the side. It's apparently faster. Seems like it would help you get deeper too. I've also had an assistant college coach tell me I should be doing this. Haven't experimented much with it yet though.

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    Very Active Member geochuck's Avatar
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    Re: Ande's Swimming Tips: Swimming Faster Faster

    Here is a 2004 video of a backstroke start, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c0c8g...eature=related
    Keep it simple George Park
    Swimsuit Sale http://www.swimdownhill.com/index.html

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    Re: Ande's Swimming Tips: Swimming Faster Faster

    Quote Originally Posted by geochuck View Post
    Here is a 2004 video of a backstroke start, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c0c8g...eature=related
    Done correctly: Lane 4
    Lane 5's heels were dragging in the water.
    ..... Where, Oh, where did I last see my swimming suit? Oh well!

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    Re: Ande's Swimming Tips: Swimming Faster Faster

    Tip 199 Perspective

    One of the hardest thing for swimmers to get is perspective.
    We can't see all the details of ourselves swimming, while we're swimming.
    We can see bits and pieces. We can watch our hands as they enter the water, but we really miss a lot of improtant information.

    We can have a friend make a video of us swimming, the easiest way to video is with the filmer out of the water.
    but from that perspective it's really hard to see what's happening underwater.

    The best perspective is from IN the water, but the person filming needs to film from either an underwater window in the pool or use an underwater video camera. I don't think those moving underwater video cameras they use in big meets are very affordable.

    Once you have a video, you can watch it, see what you're doing and identify mistakes and work to correct them.

    My buddy Tyler brought an Olympus camera to practice where he recorded this video:
    http://youtube.com/watch?v=1h9blJ8Axy0
    You can see my technique is a far cry from these world class swimmers.
    http://youtube.com/watch?v=Ym_ks0aHkCE

    You might want to get a camera that can make underwater videos, then have a friend shoot you as you swim.

    like the olympus
    http://tinyurl.com/2w9866

    I'd probably get the kit
    http://tinyurl.com/2mu4mf

    Then you can create underwater footage and put it up on youtube for us to watch and offer suggestions and compliments.

    If you gain perspective you're likely to swim faster faster.
    Last edited by ande; March 28th, 2008 at 11:58 AM.

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    Re: Ande's Swimming Tips: Swimming Faster Faster

    Tip 200 Talk with Your Coach at Meets

    I hope to share everything I know about swimming in SFF, including the simple things that everyone should know.

    When you are at a meet and you have a coach present, ask your coach

    what you should do for warm up

    Also before each race, find your coach and talk about your up coming see if they have any last words or suggestions.

    When you finish your race before you warm down, visit your coach, review your splits, see if she has any feedback for you.

    don't be an attention hog, keep it brief, she's likely to be busy,
    if she's watching a team mate race, wait till the race is done

    if she's talking with another teammate, wait your turn.

    Feedback after each race can be critical and the key to helping you Swim Faster Faster the next time you race the same event. After Race feedback gives you something to focus on when you train.

    If your coach isn't at the meet, talk about your swims at practice or get her cell #, have a brief chat. You can also do it by email, but don't send a super long email with lots of questions, keep it short and to the to point.

    Always thank your coach for their feedback.

    Also if your coach isn't present help your team mates, get their splits, watch their races, give them tips, encourage them, congratulate them, console them, and loudly cheer before during and after their race.

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    Re: Ande's Swimming Tips: Swimming Faster Faster

    Tip 201 Which Suit Suits you? More On Racing Suits

    The new racing suits are faster than regular suits. They provide a better surface than skin. They hold our jiggly parts in place.

    They should fit tight, be difficult to get on (and off) and slightly uncomfortable to wear.


    Types of Suits: Shape and Cut

    1) Regular:

    2) Jammer: waist to just above the knee

    3) Legskin: waist to ankle

    4) Knee skin: neck to thigh just above knee

    5) Hineck: neck to ankle

    6) Full Body: neck to ankle, with arms covered to wrist.


    Generations of Speedo Fastskin Racing Suits:
    (other companies have similar generations)

    1) 1992 S2000 The world's first fast suit. Barcelona Olympics

    2) 1996 AquaBlade pretty stretchy can get a size smaller

    3) 2000 Fastskin pretty stretchy can get a size smaller

    3) 2004 FS II pretty stretchy can get a size or 2 smaller

    4) 2007 FASTSKIN FS-PRO made of the old paper suit material, not as stretchy as FS II or Fastskin,
    same size or one down, On legskins and hinecks the PRO goes further up your calf.
    (some women have had difficulty getting suit over their hips and thighs)
    I like the fabric but some sections of the suit use a double layer

    5) 2008 LZR (pros have them now) not stretchy but bubbling up can be issue, swimmers are squeezing into smaller sizes, parts of the suit are rubber like panels over fabric available in July

    My favorite latest generation tech suit that is available now is the
    Blue Seventy Nero Comp
    Blue Seventy was first to to put rubber on fabric for racing skins
    It's a very fast suit and helped me drop from
    25.3 to 24.50 in the 50 free and
    29.5 to 28.14 in the 50 back


    Which Suit Suits you?
    Elite swimmers wear different suits for different events

    Breastrokers and IMers
    tend to wear jammers and legskins.
    Women breastrokers often wear kneeskins, though some wear hinecks.

    Backstrokers and Flyers
    tend to wear legskins.
    Women hinecks

    Freestylers tend to wear hineck suits and legskins.


    Here's where you can see examples of different racing suits and brands.

    Mens Jammers
    http://tinyurl.com/2wree6

    Mens LegSkins
    http://tinyurl.com/25hzh4

    Mens Full Body
    http://tinyurl.com/yu2hwd

    Womens Full body
    http://tinyurl.com/264te8

    Womens
    http://tinyurl.com/3hyo4f


    BUBBLING UP
    Watch out for bubbling up, this is a very serious issue. It's where water gets trapped between the suit and your body and you have to carry that extra weight in your race, which makes you slower. I've heard of this happening to swimmers during their races


    Putting On Your Racing Suit

    Be very careful putting on (and taking off) your racing suit because they are easy to rip. If you have nails I suggest pinching the fabric with your thumb and index finger knuckle. Some women wear gardening gloves.

    Racing suits are difficult to put on when DRY and almost impossible to put on when WET.

    Put a DRY Suit on a Dry body,
    if you're wet or sweaty take a little time to dry off.

    Sit Down:
    It's not pretty watching someone trying to put on a racing suit (or take one off) while they are standing up. Bring a towel into the locker room to sit on when you put and take off your suit.

    Before you put on your suit, hold it up to make sure you're putting it on correctly. They don't work well inside out or backwards.

    Get Your Suit Past Your Feet
    Some people suggest using a plastic bag to put over your foot.
    You can use an acrylic sock and look less silly.

    Men often have a hard time getting their suits past their heels.
    Be sure to roll up the suit leg up like pantyhose.
    Make sure it the leg correctly oriented and not twisted.
    Put on one leg at a time.

    The next check point is to make sure the suit fits flush with your crotch, you don't want a gap there. If there's one, your suit is likely to fill up with water while you race. If there is a gap, don't say good enough. Roll down each leg pull the suit up higher on your calf and try again.
    The suit needs to fit flush.

    Women tend to face challenges getting their racing suits over their thighs and hips. Be patient. Pro's are tougher because they stretch less than FS II's & 1's.

    If you're wearing a hineck, unless you have circus freak flexibility you will need someone to zip and unzip you.
    Just ask. People are happy to help, even strangers.

    If you have wide shoulders, squeeze them together when you're being zipped. it makes it easier.

    Make sure you are zipped in and ready to go before you race.


    If you only have one suit, and several races keep it on between races.


    Around the Deck
    Be careful when wearing your suit around the pool deck, wear something soft and warm over it to protect the fabric. I ripped a hole in my first FS II hineck because I sat in a lawn chair and a rivot ripped it. When I'm on deck I at least wrap a towel around my waist or wear sweats. Also be careful getting in and out of the pool, use a ladder if possible.

    Racing Suits work best when DRY. Don't warm up in them. Save it for your race. Suits work best when NEW. The more you wear them the more stretched out they get.

    Own several Suits
    If you can afford it, own several suits, so if you're swimming multiple events you can change out of a wet one and into a dry one for each event.

    On hineck suits
    When you're not racing, for comfort, you can undo and roll down the top and wear it around your waist, women can do this too just wear a tshirt.

    When you get home or back to the hotel, immediately hang your suit to dry to use the next day or next time.

    NEVER PUT A FAST SKIN IN THE DRYER

    Surprisingly, elite swimmers shave the skin that's covered by their suits. Legs, arms, chest, belly and back.

    When purchasing one for the first time you have to balance
    fit and affordability.

    When your suit arrives try it on at home to see if you can get in it.
    It was an ordeal to put on my Speedo Pro hineck.
    If you can get it on and it seems to fit well bring it to practice and try it out on a fast swim.

    If you dive in and get it wet, it's yours.

    If you order a suit last minute you run a risk of it not fitting well and not being able to exchange it fast enough.
    Get your suit well in advance of your meet.
    Try it on at home.
    Try it out in practice on very fast meet like swims.

    It's a bad idea to not try out your racing suit until you get to the meet.
    It's smart to have several tested back up racing suits in yout swim bag at the meet.

    Also companies roll out new suits generations, their older generations tend to become more affordable so keep your eye open for bargains.

    Sometimes you might be able to get new racing suits off of EBAY.

    Get the right kind of racing suit and you're very likely to swim faster faster. Find the suit that suits you.

    here's the link to Even More On Suits


    GUIDE TO PUTTING ON A FASTSKIN® FS-PRO SUIT

    Slow, step by step, no fingertips

    1. Place one leg in the suit, making sure seams are correctly positioned.
    *Note- The leg of the suit falls mid calf- roughly 5 inches above the ankle

    2. Gently pull up the suit to just above the knee making sure the material is pulled tight and there are no creases.

    3. Repeat the process for the second leg, correctly positioning seams and gently pulling the suit just above the knee, taking care to eliminate all of the creases.

    4. Once the suit is past the knee on both legs, begin the process of pulling it up bit by bit alternately up each leg.

    5. Do not use fingernails to pull the suit. Pull the suit up with the care that you would use with a delicate pair of tights.

    6. Before attempting to pull the suit over the rear ensure that the legs have been fully pulled up to the top of the thighs and crotch.

    7. Then hitch the suit up over the rear and arrange the top of the legs, crotch and seams of the suit so it is comfortable and fitting well before pulling the suit up and over the core of the body.

    8. Any adjustments to the top of the suit need to be made to the bottom first. Always pull from the knee up to adjust the butt and shoulders.

    9. Do not rush putting on the suit. Allow plenty of time to put on correctly.

    Helpful Tips
    *Wet fingers will help grip the fabric and pull up the suit.
    *Adjust the suit from the knees up to the hips to adjust the shoulders.
    *Make sure the crotch seams are high on the hip bones.
    *If top of suit is too big then size down.
    *Take your time!

    Here's a doc about how to put on a wetsuit
    many of the same principles apply
    http://www.blueseventy.com/docs/BS_FIT_CHART__08.pdf
    Last edited by ande; August 2nd, 2008 at 11:43 AM.

  13. #733
    Very Active Member Redbird Alum's Avatar
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    Re: Ande's Swimming Tips: Swimming Faster Faster

    Ande -

    Very ice synopsis post of current suit alternatives at the high end.

    Are you going to do a treatment of the caps in use as well?

    Matt


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    Re: Ande's Swimming Tips: Swimming Faster Faster

    thank you
    great idea I'll address caps soon
    there are a few new caps

    Quote Originally Posted by Redbird Alum View Post
    Ande -

    Very ice synopsis post of current suit alternatives at the high end.

    Are you going to do a treatment of the caps in use as well?

    Matt

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    Re: Ande's Swimming Tips: Swimming Faster Faster

    Tip 202 Use Your Head: Racing Caps

    our heads are the first point of contact with the water when we swim. It's a shame we don't have the sleek streamlined shape of dolphins. Our heads are blunt, most heads have hair. Hair causes drag. The longer the hair the greater the drag, plus wet hair adds weight and the more hair a swimmer has the more weight she has to move through the water when she swims.

    If you really want to swim fast, shave your head. Most swimmers don't want to sacrifice their hair for the sake of swimming.

    If you're not going to shave your head then you should definitely wear a racing cap. I prefer the kind of caps that don't have wrinkles, since wrinkles can add drag.

    If you like your hair, it's a good idea to wear a cap in training, it protects your hair from chemical damage.

    If your hair is long and swimming is important to you, you should probably have a shorter cut. Less hair = less weight & less drag.

    Women with long hair try this, instead of making a big ball in the back of your cap. Twist your hair in a pony tail then lift it up and over the top of your head then put on your cap so you'd have a raised ridge in the middle of your head, rather than the ball in the back.

    Caps slide on easier when wet than dry.

    World class sprinters wear their googles under their caps.
    If your googles have an eye piece ridge, place the bottom of the cap over the top idge of your goggles and it will be practically impossible for you to lose your goggles when you dive in.

    If your hair is too long for you to put your goggles on first,
    put on a cap, then put on googles, then put on another cap.

    Natalie Coughlin does this: (watch the end of this)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VMe5y5i0uzw

    If you're swimming longer races, remember that caps trap heat.
    Silicone caps are thicker so they are likely to trap more heat latex.

    What's the pool temperature?
    If the pool temp is on the warm end like 80, 81, 82 or up
    consider latex or no cap

    I strongly suggest caps that eliminate wrinkles
    Try the:
    Speedo Racer Dome Silicone Cap or the
    Nike Swim Dual Durometer Cap
    http://tinyurl.com/5lh5xg

    For those of you with long hair who refuse to cut it,
    Speedo offers the Long Hair Silicone Cap

    Inspect your cap at meets, if it has a rip near the edge it's just a matter of time before it rips completely. Which means it's likely to rip and break right before your race, so it's a good idea to have back ups near by.

    When wearing a cap, pull it down as as far as it can go but still be able to see. The cap should cover your ears, most of your forehead, and all your head hair.

    In longer races, swimmers can suffer from cap creep. That's where your cap keeps slipping up your head and either falls off or is about to fall off. If it slips a lot, you might need to pull it off during a race. If you're swimming freestyle, try to pull it off on a turn.

    Speedo has a new generation of caps in the works called
    Speedo Aqua V-Cap
    Last edited by ande; April 24th, 2008 at 04:05 PM.

  16. #736
    Very Calm Member jim clemmons's Avatar
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    Re: Ande's Swimming Tips: Swimming Faster Faster

    Quote Originally Posted by ande View Post
    Tip 202 Use Your Head: Racing Caps

    Our heads are blunt...
    Some are more blunt than others. May be attributed to practicing racing starts too often. Study not finalized...

    Quote Originally Posted by ande View Post
    If you're swimming longer races, remember that caps trap heat.
    What's the pool temperature?
    If the pool temp is on the warm end like 80, 81, 82 or up
    consider latex or no cap
    Good point. I learned that, for me, anything 800m or longer doesn't get a cap (usually) regardless of water temp. This was after reaching the boiling point during the 1650 at Hawaii Nat's in '02. My entire upper body and especially my face, felt like it was on fire.
    Jim

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    Re: Ande's Swimming Tips: Swimming Faster Faster

    Tip 203 List of What to Pack in your Swim Bag for a Swim Meet

    First get a good swim bag, not too big, not too small.
    Mine has several sections and pockets
    Main Section,
    2 side pockets on each end one dry one wet
    plus a narrow pocket that goes the length of the bag
    Strong nylon Construction
    Something like this
    http://b.tinyurl.com/5cszej


    Main compartment
    1 or more racing suits
    towels / shammy (if you're staying at a hotel use hotel towels at the meet)
    sweats
    socks
    Dock Bag (razor, shampoo, conditioner, deod, prescriptions, scissors, nail file and clippers )
    (scissors are super handy, swimmers are always needing to snip threads on suits, goggle straps, ... )
    Street clothes
    flip flops


    Dry Pocket
    ball point pens (i prefer uniball) and
    highlighter
    paper
    money bills and quarters for parking
    USMS card (always keep copies of it so you have it at meets and if you drop in to train with a team when you're traveling)
    ipod
    journal
    book
    stopwatch
    camera
    wallet
    keys
    cell phone
    lock for locker if you use them


    Wet pocket
    2 or more training suits to warm up
    put your wet racing suits here, but hang them up when you get back to the hotel
    keep your cap and googles out of the wet pocket, they'll mildew
    I wrap my googles around one of the zipper straps so they dry out between uses


    Long side pocket
    2 swim caps, I carry spare longhorn caps to give as gifts when I visit teams
    2 googles

    Also if you're traveling by air, carry on your swim bag
    with goggles, racing suits, caps, stuff you can't buy or replace if your luggage gets lost. Don't risk it.

    What else? Help me develop a comprehensive list
    I'm sure I left out some must haves.


    Luxuries
    pillow
    blanket
    chair

    Next find yourself a prime patch of pool space to inhabit while you're at the meet,
    dry, where you can watch race and cheer, where you can see results, plenty of room for teams mates, I prefer places where you do don't have to make many trips up and down stairs

    If you have all the equipment you need at meets and you can easily find what you need, when you need it, you're likely to swim faster faster.
    Last edited by ande; April 20th, 2008 at 07:04 PM.

  18. #738
    Very Active Member rtodd's Avatar
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    Re: Ande's Swimming Tips: Swimming Faster Faster

    Advil.
    Energy/recovery powder/drinks and other suppliments.

  19. #739
    Back is faster than Fly poolraat's Avatar
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    Re: Ande's Swimming Tips: Swimming Faster Faster

    A yoga mat is handy for resting on, stretching and for sitting on if you don't have a chair. The one I use can be rolled or folded and stored in the bottom of your swim bag when travelling.
    I have entered the snapdragon stage of my life (Part of me has snapped and the rest of me is draggin ).

  20. #740
    Very Active Member
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    Re: Ande's Swimming Tips: Swimming Faster Faster

    great suggestions / additions

    Quote Originally Posted by rtodd View Post
    Advil.
    Energy/recovery powder/drinks and other suppliments.
    Quote Originally Posted by poolraat View Post
    A yoga mat is handy for resting on, stretching and for sitting on if you don't have a chair. The one I use can be rolled or folded and stored in the bottom of your swim bag when travelling.

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