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Thread: Gym exercise

  1. #1
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    Gym exercise

    any exercise that works well with swimmers? what muscles do i need to concentrate on building for swimming? what i need to avoid?

  2. #2
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    Re: Gym exercise

    I'm quite a fan of working the triceps particularly. Shoulders, hips adductors and abductors, back... pretty much everything; it's just all about how you train them. Remember you're training for endurance exercise, not bodybuilding

  3. #3
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    Re: Gym exercise

    Nate,

    Like a golf swing, a swimming stroke has many components contributing to power and speed. In swimming you have the start, turn, a streamlined body, timing, tempo, breathing, and a propulsive pull and kick. Just like golf and most sports all the components that make-up the end result, starts with a “set-up”. In golf, before you can swing the club you need to properly grip the club and address the ball with the proper stance. In swimming, you have to “set-up” your hand and forearm in the most propulsive position or all the other things don’t work well. This position you put your hand and forearm in is called the Early Vertical Forearm position or EVF.
    In the following Swimming World website video/interview https://www.swimmingworldmagazine.com/tv/preview.asp titled Freestyle Coaching - Catch or Release, some of the top coaches at the recent Senior Nationals at Irvine California were asked that question; what would you teach first when teaching the freestyle. Nine of the eleven said the catch (Early Vertical Forearm EVF). Nine of the eleven said things like: a great catch leads to a great release; absolutely and definitely the catch (must be taught first), without the catch the rest doesn’t matter; elbow over the hand is what we teach. It’s time that everyone knows that the catch is not just an important component to swimming fast, it’s vital for every stroke and every swimmer can improve it.
    It’s gets a little technical but each competitive stroke (freestyle, backstroke, breaststroke, butterfly) can be separated into four different segments or quadrants. The front quadrant is where propulsion initiates; the second quadrant is where the acceleration of the stroke occurs; the third quadrant where the recovery is initiated and the fourth quadrant is where the recovery makes the transition to the entry. The all important EVF position can be found in the first quadrant of each stroke.
    The following website article, by Rich Straus, http://www.trifuel.com/triathlon/swi...tch-000830.php “Where Power Begins,” will help you better understand what a catch is and why it’s important to swimmers.
    One of the best ways to understand the EVF is by seeing underwater videos of great swimmers performing the skill. Go to utube and type in “EVF + Swimming” and you’ll see the front quadrant EVF skills performed by Olympic and Nationally ranked swimmers. The breaststroke, backstroke, butterfly, and freestyle are all demonstrated by the best swimmers in the world and every stroke shows an effective EVF.
    Once you understand what a great EVF looks like, you’re going to need to strengthen the muscles responsible for holding the forearm in that “over-the-barrel” position. There are twelve muscles that work help hold your hand and forearm in the EVF position. The following EVF exercises shown are safe isometric exercises, requiring little or no weights.
    DRYLAND and ISOMETRIC TRAINING DRILLS
    A training response can be gained from an isometric drill performed at 80% of maximum effort for six to twenty (20) seconds or more.
    1. Isometric drill where the swimmer has both hands over their head in an EVF position. You’ll be surprised how difficult it is to keep the elbows slightly above the shoulder for any length of time.
    2. Isometric drill where the swimmer has both hands pushing up and/or against an immoveable object like a wall or a starting block.
    3. Using light weights and the most forgiving surgical tubing, have swimmers hold the EVF position for short bouts and slowly increase resistance and time.
    4. Have swimmers, while standing, mimic the EVF stroke, moving their hands up and down but never past their shoulders.
    5. Have swimmers hold a rescue tube, noodle, kick board, etc., above their head in the EVF position.
    6. Have swimmers bend-over and mimic the swimming stroke of world-class swimmers using a great EVF position.
    Nate you need to develop a sound strength training regime but it’s easy to overlook the small muscles in the shoulder responsible for getting you a better EVF. Good Luck, Coach T.

  4. #4
    Participating Member carol58's Avatar
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    Re: Gym exercise

    I swam for a long time without adding gym exercises. A couple of years ago I added an hour at the gym after swimming. I work to strengthen my arms and shoulders and back as well as some leg work. To give you an idea of the difference in my swimming endurance and ability
    I went from doing 30 lengths of breast stroke to 100 lengths of front crawl. I also kayak so shoulder and arm strength is important to me. I am not fast but can swim with no breaks for 90 mins and I am 58!
    Keep at it.

  5. #5
    Very Active Member mermaid's Avatar
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    Re: Gym exercise

    With the limited space here - I will share with you a book which I am most impressed. You can read it at your own pace and it's not written expressly for exercise physiology doctoral candidates.

    The Critical Body Core; Athletic Development - the art and science of functional sports conditioning by Vern Gambetta www.gambetta.com

    Good luck!
    Come live with me in the sea said she,
    Down on the ocean floor
    And I'll show you many's a wonderous thing
    That you've never seen before

  6. #6
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    Re: Gym exercise

    Quote Originally Posted by tomtopo View Post
    Nate,

    Like a golf swing, a swimming stroke has many components contributing to power and speed. In swimming you have the start, turn, a streamlined body, timing, tempo, breathing, and a propulsive pull and kick. Just like golf and most sports all the components that make-up the end result, starts with a “set-up”. In golf, before you can swing the club you need to properly grip the club and address the ball with the proper stance. In swimming, you have to “set-up” your hand and forearm in the most propulsive position or all the other things don’t work well. This position you put your hand and forearm in is called the Early Vertical Forearm position or EVF.
    In the following Swimming World website video/interview https://www.swimmingworldmagazine.com/tv/preview.asp titled Freestyle Coaching - Catch or Release, some of the top coaches at the recent Senior Nationals at Irvine California were asked that question; what would you teach first when teaching the freestyle. Nine of the eleven said the catch (Early Vertical Forearm EVF). Nine of the eleven said things like: a great catch leads to a great release; absolutely and definitely the catch (must be taught first), without the catch the rest doesn’t matter; elbow over the hand is what we teach. It’s time that everyone knows that the catch is not just an important component to swimming fast, it’s vital for every stroke and every swimmer can improve it.
    It’s gets a little technical but each competitive stroke (freestyle, backstroke, breaststroke, butterfly) can be separated into four different segments or quadrants. The front quadrant is where propulsion initiates; the second quadrant is where the acceleration of the stroke occurs; the third quadrant where the recovery is initiated and the fourth quadrant is where the recovery makes the transition to the entry. The all important EVF position can be found in the first quadrant of each stroke.
    The following website article, by Rich Straus, http://www.trifuel.com/triathlon/swi...tch-000830.php “Where Power Begins,” will help you better understand what a catch is and why it’s important to swimmers.
    One of the best ways to understand the EVF is by seeing underwater videos of great swimmers performing the skill. Go to utube and type in “EVF + Swimming” and you’ll see the front quadrant EVF skills performed by Olympic and Nationally ranked swimmers. The breaststroke, backstroke, butterfly, and freestyle are all demonstrated by the best swimmers in the world and every stroke shows an effective EVF.
    Once you understand what a great EVF looks like, you’re going to need to strengthen the muscles responsible for holding the forearm in that “over-the-barrel” position. There are twelve muscles that work help hold your hand and forearm in the EVF position. The following EVF exercises shown are safe isometric exercises, requiring little or no weights.
    DRYLAND and ISOMETRIC TRAINING DRILLS
    A training response can be gained from an isometric drill performed at 80% of maximum effort for six to twenty (20) seconds or more.
    1. Isometric drill where the swimmer has both hands over their head in an EVF position. You’ll be surprised how difficult it is to keep the elbows slightly above the shoulder for any length of time.
    2. Isometric drill where the swimmer has both hands pushing up and/or against an immoveable object like a wall or a starting block.
    3. Using light weights and the most forgiving surgical tubing, have swimmers hold the EVF position for short bouts and slowly increase resistance and time.
    4. Have swimmers, while standing, mimic the EVF stroke, moving their hands up and down but never past their shoulders.
    5. Have swimmers hold a rescue tube, noodle, kick board, etc., above their head in the EVF position.
    6. Have swimmers bend-over and mimic the swimming stroke of world-class swimmers using a great EVF position.
    Nate you need to develop a sound strength training regime but it’s easy to overlook the small muscles in the shoulder responsible for getting you a better EVF. Good Luck, Coach T.
    Tommy,

    Thanks for the write-up. Unnecessary as I have long understood these things, but thanks all the same

  7. #7
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    Re: Gym exercise

    Nate,
    Congratulations and good luck in your business. How is it going. This is the first I've heard of it. I bet there are many members like me who don't know about the show. I'll put it on my favorites and sorry about the redundancy. Coach Tom Topolski

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    Re: Gym exercise

    thanks for the info guys, anyway just to give you an overview of what i've been doing so far. well i've been lifting weights for more than ten years now, i also run and i only eat what i can burn, so for three days of swim lessons, i've only adjusted my weight training. i do more leg exercises but this time not to build big muscles but to make them stronger and be able to last kick training in the pool. i've adjusted my regimen to build more of my back muscles, shoulders and traps, of course more of ab work too

    what do you guys think?

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    Re: Gym exercise

    Quote Originally Posted by JMiller View Post
    Yep, it's good to improve core strength. Check out the link at the bottom of this post...
    Happy Swimming,
    thanks man!

  10. #10
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    Re: Gym exercise

    http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/jasonlezak1.htm

    tips from one of the best.

    One thing i like to do outside of swimming is to play basketball. I think for a sprinter it is very good. Its basically a series of sprints all game long. works lots of explosive moves between running and jumping. The only thing i see with it is that many swimmers i know cannot dribble worth ****.

  11. #11
    Very Active Member smontanaro's Avatar
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    Re: Gym exercise

    Quote Originally Posted by SKO View Post
    One thing i like to do outside of swimming is to play basketball.... The only thing i see with it is that many swimmers i know cannot dribble worth ****.
    Or that one of the reasons they swim now is that all those years of basketball (and volleyball) took a toll on their knees...

    Skip Montanaro

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