Blog Comments

  1. thewookiee's Avatar
    FYI...PeddIE
  2. flippergirl's Avatar
    Thanks Katie and Atlantic! I hope to get to see some of the Ultraswim tomorrow.
  3. Atlantic's Avatar
    Hope you get to see some of the Ultraswim! Have a blast in Cozumel... I'm ready for some ocean swimming too!
  4. KEWebb18's Avatar
    It sounds like you really got a lot out of that clinic.
    Good luck on your trip! Have fun!
  5. flippergirl's Avatar
    Thanks for the warning.* We picked up some Tamaflu to take just in case the "swine flu" for some wild reason finds us. I will watch for undertow. The dives there are all called "drift dives" so we will go with a dive master I am sure. It was kind of a spur of the moment trip.* Feeling excited about that. Never been to that part of the world.Thanks for the reminder on drinking water. No salsa? Bummer.
    Updated May 13th, 2009 at 05:58 PM by flippergirl
  6. qbrain's Avatar
    We were in Cancun about this time last year, and you should be afraid waves/undertow. The beach was red flagged the entire time we were there, so be safe before you try any walk out dives. If you are just sticking with the organized dives, then nothing to worry about.

    Also, be afraid of the drinking water, fresh fruit or vegatables. We got sick with two days left in our vaca, it sucked. We are pretty sure that it was some pico. Dumb us.
  7. flippergirl's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Bobinator
    It sounds like you're on to something Flipper!
    I would love to go to a workshop like that, how did you hear about it?
    Go to her website at Aquaticedge and see if she is in your area or I bet your club could try to put the class together. There is about 15 -20 people in a session I believe. It was definitely worth it. Over the next month or so I will blog my experience with the new technique. But I have two 1 week vacations coming up. Next week I am going to Cozemel to dive and then in June renting a sailboat off the NC coast.
  8. flippergirl's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by tjrpatt
    I remember it being alot less than 95 bucks. She came off very nice when I met her. I would love to do one of her camps one of these days. Pipedream here too!!
    That may have included a cookout with beverages come to think of it. I had to leave right after the class. I have looked into private instruction and was quoted 95 for each lesson. Hey "pipe"dream get it? Just realized that.
    Updated May 12th, 2009 at 08:53 AM by flippergirl
  9. Bobinator's Avatar
    It sounds like you're on to something Flipper!
    I would love to go to a workshop like that, how did you hear about it?
  10. tjrpatt's Avatar
    I remember it being alot less than 95 bucks. She came off very nice when I met her. I would love to do one of her camps one of these days. Pipedream here too!!
  11. flippergirl's Avatar
    Well is 95 dollars for three hours alot? Plus I spent some time with her the night before at the DAMA practice. She was very friendly and approachable. Going to Hawaii for a week I am sure would be a different story...but if I find my stroke improve I might look into it further...I have never been to Hawaii and you can make vacation out of it with camp in the mornings. Maybe a pipedream for now.
  12. tjrpatt's Avatar
    That is nice. I was able to do an K.P.N. clinic a few years ago before it started costly an arm and a leg and it was very beneficial.
  13. qbrain's Avatar
    Underwater is much more important then above the water when it comes to speed. Recovery does impact your shoulders, so it is worth giving some attention, because it is hard to swim fast when your shoulders hurt.
  14. flippergirl's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by qbrain
    EVF is early vertical forearm. If you watch video of most elite swimmers, their forearm goes vertical almost immediately after their hand enters the water. You will also notice that in doing so, their elbow is high. Someone who is not doing this is "dropping their elbow", and their elbow gets ahead of their hand, and their forearm provides no real pull.

    If you watch Janet Evans swim, her recovery is straight armed, but if you watch Popov in a training video, you can see his hand is below his elbow on recovery. So what we thought were were being told was to recover like Popov, not Evans. In reality, what we were being told related to the underwater part of the stroke, not the above water part.

    There is a video of EVF in the forums here TI and EVF on the same channel - Awesome - U.S. Masters Swimming Discussion Forums.

    Look at Janet Evans recovery here: YouTube - Janet Evans

    Look at Popov's revoery here:
    YouTube - Alexander Popov swimming technique

    So the first video is what we were supposed to be doing, and the second two videos were what we thought high elbows meant.
    Janet Evan's arm does look straight and her head high on the breath....but man look at her go! Wonder what her elbow is doing underneath. So this mean "high elbow" refers more to getting that EVF underwater. Gbrain...I am going to focus more on what is going on under the water as opposed to focusing on getting those elbows high. I learned to swim straight high arm in the air and have been slowly but surely correcting this with the "high elbow" phrase. Time to go under the surface and think about reach and forarm pull. I hope I am on the right track. Thanks so much for your imput.
  15. qbrain's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by flippergirl
    What is EVF and not on recovery?
    EVF is early vertical forearm. If you watch video of most elite swimmers, their forearm goes vertical almost immediately after their hand enters the water. You will also notice that in doing so, their elbow is high. Someone who is not doing this is "dropping their elbow", and their elbow gets ahead of their hand, and their forearm provides no real pull.

    If you watch Janet Evans swim, her recovery is straight armed, but if you watch Popov in a training video, you can see his hand is below his elbow on recovery. So what we thought were were being told was to recover like Popov, not Evans. In reality, what we were being told related to the underwater part of the stroke, not the above water part.

    There is a video of EVF in the forums here [ame="http://forums.usms.org/showthread.php?t=13830"]TI and EVF on the same channel - Awesome - U.S. Masters Swimming Discussion Forums[/ame].

    Look at Janet Evans recovery here: [nomedia="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6umbuMTvXZo"]YouTube - Janet Evans[/nomedia]

    Look at Popov's revoery here:
    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CIzBaSiWdRA"]YouTube - Alexander Popov swimming technique[/ame]

    So the first video is what we were supposed to be doing, and the second two videos were what we thought high elbows meant.
  16. flippergirl's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by qbrain
    Not dumb at all. Let me share a story.

    My wife swam competitively most of her life. I have swam competitively about 20% of my life.

    I turned to her last week, "You know I *just* figured out that all that time when coaches told us high elbows, they meant EVF and not on recovery."

    Her response: "I always thought they meant recovery too."

    Simple concept, but something we misunderstood for a long time. I like to think I am not dumb

    The forums and blogs are great at increasing swimming knowledge.
    What is EVF and not on recovery?
  17. qbrain's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by flippergirl
    Sorry to seem so dumb.
    Not dumb at all. Let me share a story.

    My wife swam competitively most of her life. I have swam competitively about 20% of my life.

    I turned to her last week, "You know I *just* figured out that all that time when coaches told us high elbows, they meant EVF and not on recovery."

    Her response: "I always thought they meant recovery too."

    Simple concept, but something we misunderstood for a long time. I like to think I am not dumb

    The forums and blogs are great at increasing swimming knowledge.
  18. flippergirl's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by The Fortress
    You need to train consistently to improve. So try to stick to your schedule, if possible. Bumping up to 4x a week is a good idea. I've read that going from 3 to 4 workouts can make a big difference for masters. It also gives you a chance to work on more things, e.g., speed work each week.

    You MUST do anaerobic speed work on a regular basis if you want to improve in the sprints. Medium pace work does nothing for sprints. You need to do some race pace 25s, 50s, and 100s with a lot of rest in between. Your masters coach should be giving you some speed work at least once a week. If not, ask why not and ask for some. Otherwise, you might want to swim by yourself once a week to work on speed and other agenda items (like streamlining when you're not swimming circles).

    Work on your kicking. All sprinters have strong kicks. Even middle distance swimmers need good kicks. Swimming is not just an upper body sport anymore. Once you've got a good sprint kick, you could work some on your SDKs off starts and turns.

    It's great that you signed up for a clinic. Getting some feedback on your strokes and implementing it (remember, habits can take 100s of hours to imprint) is the quickest way to make technique changes. Have someone videotape you at meets (or practices) and put the video on the forum for some feedback and analysis.

    Dryland/weights are good. You should be doing some anyway, even if you were not competing. Build up very gradually.

    Don't use paddles or do a lot of pulling until you've built the RC muscles back up and can do a little lifting. Paddles are generally evil for shoulders. If you clear up your shoulder issues, that, in and of itself, should help you swim faster.

    4 months is really nothing. Think long term. It all comes down to discipline and training. Do, don't talk.
    You just explained to me what and why I am doing those 25's. I can now spot the anerobic part of the workouts. Sorry to seem so dumb. We do do race pace training and now I know where to spot it, really push and then just make myself do the rest. I must really learn control over the clock. I am getting there.
    Sat I had a really good race pace workout. I should go to that often.

    My shoulders really are much better from physical therapy RC excercise. I don't use paddles.

    I believe and have been told in practice that I am a gifted kicker. I must not slack off there. Thats what makes me think I might be a sprinter.

    I should start a weight program of some sort. I can start with those hand bells.

    I have a video camera. I'll take it to the clinic I am going to.

    Great help!
    Updated May 5th, 2009 at 05:45 PM by flippergirl
  19. gigi's Avatar
    Wow - Doctor Fort really gave you a good diagnosis for what ails you...

    I really should sign up for a swim clinic some time as well - I'll put that on my list of goals for this year.

    Be sure to let us know how your clinic went!
  20. The Fortress's Avatar
    You need to train consistently to improve. So try to stick to your schedule, if possible. Bumping up to 4x a week is a good idea. I've read that going from 3 to 4 workouts can make a big difference for masters. It also gives you a chance to work on more things, e.g., speed work each week.

    You MUST do anaerobic speed work on a regular basis if you want to improve in the sprints. Medium pace work does nothing for sprints. You need to do some race pace 25s, 50s, and 100s with a lot of rest in between. Your masters coach should be giving you some speed work at least once a week. If not, ask why not and ask for some. Otherwise, you might want to swim by yourself once a week to work on speed and other agenda items (like streamlining when you're not swimming circles).

    Work on your kicking. All sprinters have strong kicks. Even middle distance swimmers need good kicks. Swimming is not just an upper body sport anymore. Once you've got a good sprint kick, you could work some on your SDKs off starts and turns.

    It's great that you signed up for a clinic. Getting some feedback on your strokes and implementing it (remember, habits can take 100s of hours to imprint) is the quickest way to make technique changes. Have someone videotape you at meets (or practices) and put the video on the forum for some feedback and analysis.

    Dryland/weights are good. You should be doing some anyway, even if you were not competing. Build up very gradually.

    Don't use paddles or do a lot of pulling until you've built the RC muscles back up and can do a little lifting. Paddles are generally evil for shoulders. If you clear up your shoulder issues, that, in and of itself, should help you swim faster.

    4 months is really nothing. Think long term. It all comes down to discipline and training. Do, don't talk.
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