Blog Comments

  1. scyfreestyler's Avatar
    Happy to hear you're on the road to recovery and that you're feeling good. Sounds like you're going to be doing a lot of kicking in the next few months. As fast a kicker as you've been in the past, I'm curious to see how much faster you'll get!
  2. pwb's Avatar
    Stewart, great to hear that you've had the surgery, it went well and you're on the path to recovery. Though my injury is different and I'm not yet sure if I'll be having surgery, instead of being your virtual (and sometimes in-person) training partner, consider me one of your rehab & recovery partners!
  3. flystorms's Avatar
    Stewart you've been on my mind wondering how things were going. I'm so glad to hear that the direct pain you've been feeling is gone post-op. That's huge progress. I know it'll be really hard to hold yourself back from working out, but you'll get through it. I can't wait to catch up with you in the pool again sometime this spring. Be patient, grasshopper! Thanks for the update and Merry Christmas!
    - Kari
  4. jim thornton's Avatar
    If it's not too late, have you inquired about three alternative forms of treatment, none of which will make things any worse and might actually make things better and allow you to skip surgery.

    The first is shockwave therapy, the more painful the better. I am not joking. You might see if any orthopods in your neck of the woods would do this on your elbow.

    The second is nitroglycerine patches on the elbow to foster blood flow and promote healing.

    The third, paradoxically, is injection of sclerosing agents into the elbow. One theory about both epi- and medial- condylitis is that tiny blood vessels proliferate in the area of damage and pain nerves then grow there, too, allowing the signalling of pain impulses. Supposedly, the injection of sclerosing agents chokes down this burgeoning blood supply, starving the nerves and eliminating the damage. No harm, no foul.

    Note: living on ibuprofen might be doing more harm than good. What you are suffering from is not an inflammatory condition (tendinitis) but rather close to the opposite of inflammation (tendinosis), which is characterized by lack of blood supply and the healing factors that are a hallmark of the so-called inflammatory soup.

    Abstract:

    The majority of insertional and noninsertional tendinopathy cases are associated with repetitive or overuse injuries. Certain tendons are particularly vulnerable to degenerative pathology; these include the Achilles and patella tendon, the rotator cuff, and forearm extensors/flexors. Disorders of these tendons are often chronic and can be difficult to manage successfully in the long term. Eccentric exercise has the strongest evidence of therapeutic efficacy. Extracorporeal shock wave treatment, sclerosing agents as well as nitric oxide patches show promising early results but require long-term studies. Corticosteroid and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory medications have not been shown to be effective except for temporary pain relief for rotator cuff tendinopathy. Platelet-rich plasma injections show encouraging short-term results.


    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24464332
  5. flystorms's Avatar
    Dangit, that's super frustrating for you, but you probably need to get something done. The body is talking to you.

    On a side note, it was good to catch up with you for a few minutes at the meet, Stewart. It's always a pleasure. Have a good Thanksgiving weekend.
  6. The Fortress's Avatar
    We will rehab together remotely! Let us know when your surgery is scheduled. Hope your son is all right.
  7. pwb's Avatar
    Sorry about your woes. Best wishes on a successful surgery and recovery.
    Ditto that. You've got a long career ahead of you.
  8. Kurt Dickson's Avatar
    Sorry about your woes. Best wishes on a successful surgery and recovery.
  9. flystorms's Avatar
    Poor kiddo. He's had a rough time the past year or so. I hope you can find a way to relieve the pain.
  10. Water Rat's Avatar
    Stewart, that's a great pace to hold on that interval even if you were fully health.
  11. StewartACarroll's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by flystorms
    That insomnia is miserable. I hope you're able to get back in synch again soon, Stewart. Hope the elbow is on the way to recovery. Will you have to continue to get injections?
    this is my second round and the doctor said I may need 3 but was hopeful this one will be it. Fingers crossed this is it!
  12. flystorms's Avatar
    That insomnia is miserable. I hope you're able to get back in synch again soon, Stewart. Hope the elbow is on the way to recovery. Will you have to continue to get injections?
  13. StewartACarroll's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by flystorms
    How did the elbow doc appointment go today?
    i am fine however this injection really hurt. The last PRP injection did not hurt too bad, but this time he went really deep and it was very painful. Dr told me to go back to kicking for a week. I also have a brace on my forarm to avoid me rotating my wrist.
  14. flystorms's Avatar
    How did the elbow doc appointment go today?
  15. StewartACarroll's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by The Fortress
    I agree with Flystorms and Karl. I think you could use a day off once in awhile because you train so hard. It really will make virtually no difference in your "base;" it may make you faster.

    Did you have the sleep apnea test? Consult a dr. Sometimes if you're on a bad jag, a sleep aid can get you out of it. Or you could just be an untalented sleeper like me. :-)

    I doubt you really lost much aerobic capacity when you had the elbow issue. That has not been my experience in the past. I did very little swimming before the Albatross meet with sore elbows for 6-7 weeks (then broke a bunch of WRs). Kicking is aerobic too. And I'm about to head off to the Sprint Classic after kicking for 6-7 weeks because of my bicep.
    I know...I am a workout junky! Sometimes the feeling tired is better than the feeling of not working out. I know there is something out of whack with that but it is true in my case.

    I did not do the sleep apnea test but need to. Thanks for the reminder. Bill Elizondo was showing me an app on his phone that tracks sleep and I may start with that.

    I kicked hard during my kicking period and would have thought the same thing, however when I do sets that are intense(16x100's) or are longer, I am not where I was prior to the elbow injury. And I am not talking about comfort but rather when I go as hard as I can I am struggling to get the same performance. I feel like I am back to where I was but it took a few weeks.
  16. StewartACarroll's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Karl_S
    One other comment, looking at a screen to late into the evening is probably not compatible with getting to sleep promptly and sleeping well. (I know from way too much experience.)
    I am only reading the paper if I am unable to sleep. Generally, reading does help me sleep and I run the risk with a book of waking my wife. Waking my wife up would actually be worse than me not sleeping!!!!
  17. StewartACarroll's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by flystorms
    First off, listen to your doc. Think long term, not the short term.
    Yes ma'am!



    Quote Originally Posted by flystorms
    Another note, I had a lot of issues sleeping through the night, waking around 2am for an hour or two, for a while. After talking to my doc, I've been taking a very mild, non-addictive sleeping aid, Z-Quil or the generic walgreens equivalent, for about 6 months now and the difference is amazing. I sleep all the way through the night and have been feeling so much more alert and attentive. I don't take them on the nights where I have to set an alarm - Sundays at this point. He said that as you get older, this stuff happens. Might want to look into it since you've been having so many issues as of late.

    Another thought - do you check your resting heart rate in the morning while you're still lying in bed? I started doing that the last month or so and have noticed a pattern when I'm getting to the point of overtraining, the RHR is about 10 beats higher than normal. Those days I ride the struggle bus in practice and find myself super grumpy, even with sleep. Now that I'm tracking it, I give myself permission to take a rest day and it helps a lot too. Maybe it's something you can track. My Samsung phone has a heartbeat app that will take it and record the time/date if I choose to save. You can see trends.
    I have not checked my heart rate but its a great suggestion.
  18. The Fortress's Avatar
    I agree with Flystorms and Karl. I think you could use a day off once in awhile because you train so hard. It really will make virtually no difference in your "base;" it may make you faster.

    Did you have the sleep apnea test? Consult a dr. Sometimes if you're on a bad jag, a sleep aid can get you out of it. Or you could just be an untalented sleeper like me. :-)

    I doubt you really lost much aerobic capacity when you had the elbow issue. That has not been my experience in the past. I did very little swimming before the Albatross meet with sore elbows for 6-7 weeks (then broke a bunch of WRs). Kicking is aerobic too. And I'm about to head off to the Sprint Classic after kicking for 6-7 weeks because of my bicep.
  19. Karl_S's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by flystorms
    First off, listen to your doc. Think long term, not the short term.
    'can't argue with that advice.

    Quote Originally Posted by flystorms
    Another thought - do you check your resting heart rate in the morning while you're still lying in bed? I started doing that the last month or so and have noticed a pattern when I'm getting to the point of overtraining, the RHR is about 10 beats higher than normal. Those days I ride the struggle bus in practice and find myself super grumpy, even with sleep. Now that I'm tracking it, I give myself permission to take a rest day and it helps a lot too. Maybe it's something you can track. My Samsung phone has a heartbeat app that will take it and record the time/date if I choose to save. You can see trends.
    another very fine idea.

    One other comment, looking at a screen to late into the evening is probably not compatible with getting to sleep promptly and sleeping well. (I know from way too much experience.)
  20. flystorms's Avatar
    First off, listen to your doc. Think long term, not the short term.

    Another note, I had a lot of issues sleeping through the night, waking around 2am for an hour or two, for a while. After talking to my doc, I've been taking a very mild, non-addictive sleeping aid, Z-Quil or the generic walgreens equivalent, for about 6 months now and the difference is amazing. I sleep all the way through the night and have been feeling so much more alert and attentive. I don't take them on the nights where I have to set an alarm - Sundays at this point. He said that as you get older, this stuff happens. Might want to look into it since you've been having so many issues as of late.

    Another thought - do you check your resting heart rate in the morning while you're still lying in bed? I started doing that the last month or so and have noticed a pattern when I'm getting to the point of overtraining, the RHR is about 10 beats higher than normal. Those days I ride the struggle bus in practice and find myself super grumpy, even with sleep. Now that I'm tracking it, I give myself permission to take a rest day and it helps a lot too. Maybe it's something you can track. My Samsung phone has a heartbeat app that will take it and record the time/date if I choose to save. You can see trends.