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Thread: Coronavirus/Covid19 discussions.

  1. #61
    aka Elaine-iaK & Aqua Dog ElaineK's Avatar
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    Re: Coronavirus/Covid19 discussions.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Copeland View Post
    Maybe because they took the advice to stick to the topic and not take personal jabs.
    I first responded to this message here; however, I have moved it to a private message to you, so I can be more specific without getting kicked off of here. After sending it though, I'm not sure I interpreted your post correctly.
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  2. #62
    Very Active Member Chris Stevenson's Avatar
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    Re: Coronavirus/Covid19 discussions.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Copeland View Post
    Maybe because they took the advice to stick to the topic and not take personal jabs.
    Ouch, that's going to leave a mark.

    On topic: I'm interested in some feedback. Since about July (when my doc gave me the green light post-shoulder surgery) I've been swimming indoors in a 25m Y pool that allows 2 swimmers max per lane, one starting on either side. It uses a reservation system. Since the university pool has been opened, I'll sometimes swim there because swimming is restricted to students/faculty/staff, and I always have a lane to myself and in fact usually the lanes on either side of me are empty too.

    But of course it is nice to swim with others. My masters group is starting back up after labor day but they plan to allow SIX swimmers per lane. The combination of that plus adding new people to my "bubble" has me...concerned. Am I over-reacting?

    I understand that people have different tolerance to risk. Despite my stated concern, I'd say I'm pretty much middle of the pack in that regard. Heck, I'm teaching in-person classes and labs (everyone is masked, seated 6ft+ apart, and could not start class until they tested negative).

    Thoughts?

  3. #63
    aka Elaine-iaK & Aqua Dog ElaineK's Avatar
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    Re: Coronavirus/Covid19 discussions.

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Stevenson View Post
    Ouch, that's going to leave a mark.

    On topic: I'm interested in some feedback. Since about July (when my doc gave me the green light post-shoulder surgery) I've been swimming indoors in a 25m Y pool that allows 2 swimmers max per lane, one starting on either side. It uses a reservation system. Since the university pool has been opened, I'll sometimes swim there because swimming is restricted to students/faculty/staff, and I always have a lane to myself and in fact usually the lanes on either side of me are empty too.

    But of course it is nice to swim with others. My masters group is starting back up after labor day but they plan to allow SIX swimmers per lane. The combination of that plus adding new people to my "bubble" has me...concerned. Am I over-reacting?

    I understand that people have different tolerance to risk. Despite my stated concern, I'd say I'm pretty much middle of the pack in that regard. Heck, I'm teaching in-person classes and labs (everyone is masked, seated 6ft+ apart, and could not start class until they tested negative).

    Thoughts?
    One thing that would have me concerned about this scenario is the latest scientific findings on how far microscopic aerosols can travel. Six feet is now considered outdated advice, because the distance is ten feet or more. In addition, the latest studies have proven that those microscopic aerosols can stay suspended in the air (indoors) for hours. What would concern me is amount of time your teammates would be in the pool close to each other, talking, and NOT swimming. Chlorine kill the aerosols that get exhaled INTO the water, but what about the aerosols that stay suspended in the air when people just talk? These are the ones to be concerned about. If it were me, I would take a pass on being that close to that many swimmers, which is a LOT riskier than the classroom and lab scenario you describe.

    P.S. Leave a mark? Not on me it won't!


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  4. #64
    Very Active Member scyfreestyler's Avatar
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    Re: Coronavirus/Covid19 discussions.

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Stevenson View Post
    Ouch, that's going to leave a mark.

    On topic: I'm interested in some feedback. Since about July (when my doc gave me the green light post-shoulder surgery) I've been swimming indoors in a 25m Y pool that allows 2 swimmers max per lane, one starting on either side. It uses a reservation system. Since the university pool has been opened, I'll sometimes swim there because swimming is restricted to students/faculty/staff, and I always have a lane to myself and in fact usually the lanes on either side of me are empty too.

    But of course it is nice to swim with others. My masters group is starting back up after labor day but they plan to allow SIX swimmers per lane. The combination of that plus adding new people to my "bubble" has me...concerned. Am I over-reacting?

    I understand that people have different tolerance to risk. Despite my stated concern, I'd say I'm pretty much middle of the pack in that regard. Heck, I'm teaching in-person classes and labs (everyone is masked, seated 6ft+ apart, and could not start class until they tested negative).

    Thoughts?
    Six swimmers per lane, presumably at an indoor pool? That's too close for comfort for me. I'd be second guessing myself all the time.

    Listening to NPR yesterday I heard a guest speaking of a test which would be perfect for this sort of scenario, but, for some reason, there's been no pressure to get these into widespread use.




    Dr. Michael Mina, assistant professor of epidemiology and assistant professor of immunology and infectious diseases at the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health. Associate medical director in clinical microbiology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School. Core member of the Center for Communicable Disease Dynamics. (@michaelmina_lab)


    Interview Highlights
    On how rapid coronavirus tests work

    Dr. Michael Mina: “COVID tests can actually be put onto a piece of paper, very much like a pregnancy test. In fact, it's almost exactly like a pregnancy test. But instead of looking for the hormones that tell if somebody is pregnant, it looks for the virus proteins that are part of SA's code to virus. And it would be very simple: You'd either swab the front of your nose or you'd take some saliva from under your tongue, for example, and put it onto one of these paper strips, essentially. And if you see a line, it means you're positive. And if you see no line, it means you are negative, at least for having a high viral load that could be transmissible to other people.

    “It's a technology called lateral flow, which is because, essentially, the viral particles literally flow across the piece of paper and get pulled by these little proteins on the paper to create the line, essentially. And the technology has been around for a very long time for lots of pathogens. We use it all the time in clinics around the world, for things like malaria, for example. They can be produced very, very cheaply. And so far, we haven't put them to wide scale use for this virus during this pandemic. But they certainly can be available. And in fact, the company Abbott just the other day came out with a commercial version of it that was FDA approved at them. At this moment in time, it's approved only for use by medical professionals and with a doctor's order, for example, of symptomatic people. But it's a good first step in the right direction where we will start to see these, I believe, become more and more readily available to the general public.”

  5. #65
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    Re: Coronavirus/Covid19 discussions.

    Rob,

    Your answer is right on the money. The thread was dominated by group think and herd mentality instead of considering other perspectives. I have no desire to be brow-beaten and be insulted because my thoughts are different.

  6. #66
    aka Elaine-iaK & Aqua Dog ElaineK's Avatar
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    Re: Coronavirus/Covid19 discussions.

    Quote Originally Posted by Windrath View Post
    Rob,

    Your answer is right on the money. The thread was dominated by group think and herd mentality instead of considering other perspectives. I have no desire to be brow-beaten and be insulted because my thoughts are different.

    Paul, I can't speak for the others who have posted on this thread; however, I will speak for myself: You were not the person I was referring to in some of my previous comments. Although I did not agree with some of the options you had proposed, I did appreciate that those various options were well thought out and presented.

    As for "group think and herd mentality", I am not one to follow the group or herd, unless they are factually correct. On COVID-19 and other health matters, I listen to qualified scientists. In this case, Dr. Fauci is considered by his peers to be THE authority on epidemiology. Sure he made some mistakes early on (and, it irked me to no end that he and Birx weren't wearing masks early on in the pandemic, while standing shoulder-to-shoulder with others at the press conferences!); however, that is why it is called the "novel" coronavirus. It is new and there was a lot the scientists didn't know about it. Still, they knew (and still know) a hell of a lot more about it than every single one of us posting on these forums!

    If/when I agreed with any of the other posters on here, it was because they were saying the same things that I had heard from the scientists with the most knowledge on the subject, including Dr. Fauci. Facts are facts (they aren't "fake news"), and science is real.
    http://ElaineiaKsTravels.wordpress.com

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